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« The "B" Word -- as in Billions of Dollars -- and the Chesapeake Bay | Main | Check Out the Blue Ridge Oyster Festival »

04/13/2012

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A gravid copepod.

It looks like some sort of cuttlefish or shrimp relative, but can't place the species yet..

A baby shrimp?

I copied the definition of Gammaridea from Wikipedia: "Gammaridea is a suborder of small, shrimp-like crustaceans in the order Amphipoda. It contains about 7,275 (92%) of the 7,900 described species of amphipods, in approximately 1,000 genera, divided among around 125 families. includes almost all freshwater amphipods (such as Gammarus pulex), but most of its members are marine. The group may be paraphyletic, and a 2003 revision by Myers and Lowry moved several families from Gammaridea to join members of the former Caprellidea in a new suborder Corophiidea." http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gammaridea

UPDATED SUBSPECIES: Gammarus lacustris is semi-transparent and lacks a webbed tail. It may be colorless, brown, reddish or bluish in color, depending on the local environment. It has seven abdominal segments, a fused cephalothorax, and two pairs of antennae. Unlike other crustaceans, amphipods lack carapaces and have laterally compressed bodies. Gammarids are referred to as scuds or sideswimmers. G. lacustris resembles a freshwater shrimp.

Mysid...

(I guess "mysid shrimp" would be more accurate)

An acartiid copepod, possibly Acartia tonsa.

cyclopoid copepod

Actually, I believe that is a copepod of the genus euchaeta and order calanoida.

Apparently his name is Paledude, at least that is what the photo ALT text says. :)

Thanksdude :)

I know this guy..his name is Todd....lives in back creek and collects Star Wars action figures when he's not busy reading the latest issue of Algae Today.

crayfish?

So... are we still guessing? Copepods are difficult to identify. Paraeuchaeta? Perhaps P. elongata or P. norvegica?

UPDATE: The creature is a copepod with eggs. And the first reader to guess correctly was Ryan Trueblood. Congrats, Ryan, and thanks to everyone for playing.


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