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« Arlington: More Green, Less Stormwater | Main | DC Program Pays Residents to Reduce Stormwater Pollution »

10/31/2012

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"That improved resilience comes from the Bay region states implementing plans to meet EPA pollution limits for the Chesapeake that are like blueprints for saving the Bay. Important actions include the installation of stormwater management systems that allow rain water to sink into the ground rather than run off."

What.............
Blueprints are plans......meaning it is in the planning satage and yet to be implemented or installed........so how could it reduce pollution?

I await your answer and ask that put some forethought into these articles.

Will the day ever come that wastewater treatment plant never have major overflows?
Or will they continue to be so common that they are of little concern as you have made them to be in this article.
It is funny how septic systems are given such a bad label to the demise of the bay but the constant oveflows of public sewers is just another day.

Until the stormwater/wastewater issue is addressed the bay will never recover.
Note: Septic systems are generally not effected by stormwater and the words septic system and millions of gallons of overflow will never be used in the same sentence.

Thanks for the feedback, Mark.

For the rest of the readers, here is the text in the blog article that Mark was questioning. It appeared after the Don Boesch quote:

"That improved resilience comes from the Bay region states implementing plans to meet EPA pollution limits for the Chesapeake that are like blueprints for saving the Bay. Important actions include the installation of stormwater management systems that allow rain water to sink into the ground rather than run off."

I have since removed this section, because it might have confused readers with its discussion of past improvements and future plans.

Here is an explanation of what I meant:

Over more than a decade, the Bay regional states have been implementing plans to reduce pollution into the Chesapeake, in part by upgrading sewage treatment plants. I called the most recent of these plans "blueprints," but the basis for these blueprints were water quality improvement strategies for Bay tributaries that were created by the states years ago and partially implemented.

Driven in part by these plans, improvements in sewage treatment plants (as well as better practices to reduce runoff of pollution from farms), have meant a gradual improvement in water quality in the Bay. This, in turn, helps the Bay's resilience and ability to bounce back after major storms.


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