This Week in the Watershed

YorkCounty39-1200
Agricultural runoff, such as from this farm in York County, PA, is an area where pollution-reduction efforts need acceleration. Photo by John Pavoncello/York Dispatch.

We might sound like a broken record at times, but there's a reason why we're always talking about the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. Unlike previous Bay cleanup plans, the Blueprint sets two-year, incremental goals, known as milestones, to ensure states are on track to meet their pollution-reduction commitments. The Blueprint goal is to have 60 percent of the pollution-reduction practices in place by 2017 and 100 percent in place by 2025. Last Friday the EPA released their assessment of progress made by the states in their 2014-15 milestones.

While states are making significant progress, cleanup efforts are off track. As CBF President Will Baker states, "The [Bay] region is not on track to meet its 2017 goals, largely as a result of Pennsylvania's failure to reduce nitrogen pollution from agriculture. While we acknowledge that some progress has been made in Pennsylvania, the Commonwealth has consistently failed to meet its goals, missing the mark in the last three two-year milestone periods."

These milestones provide the opportunity to highlight shortfalls, identify a proper course of action, and accelerate efforts. In this case, all the Bay states, but particularly Pennsylvania, need to focus on reducing agricultural pollution. The work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams never stops. We will continue fighting to save this national treasure and leave a legacy of clean water to our children and future generations. Click here to read CBF's full statement on the EPA milestones assessments.

This Week in the Watershed: Milestones, Stinky Sea Lettuce, and A Susquehanna Paddle

  • A fish spill on Virginia's Eastern Shore left approximately 2,000 bushels of dead and dying menhaden washing up on shore. (The Virginian-Pilot—VA)
  • On the shores of Kent Island, rotting sea lettuce is leaving a noxious odor to the chagrin of many residents. (Kent Island Bay Times—MD)
  • Efforts to reduce excess nutrients through stormwater controls are also providing the additional benefit of removing toxic pollutants from local waterways. (Bay Journal)
  • Some Pennsylvanians are concerned over the use of biosolidsfertilizer from treated human sewage. (Altoona Mirror—PA)
  • Baltimore is behind on its plans to reduce polluted runoff by eliminating impermeable surfaces and creating new wetlands. (Baltimore Sun—MD)
  • A group of media members was invited for a paddle on the Susquehanna River, experiencing it's beauty and learning about the challenges it faces. (Lebanon Daily News—PA)
  • The EPA released their assessment of progress by Bay states in their 2014-15 milestones. The findings reveal there is much work to be done, especially in Pennsylvania. (AP) Bonus: CBF Statement
  • Numbers for blue crabs are up this year, but how does that impact the watermen who depend on them? (Washington Post—D.C.)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

Throughout June

June 25

  • Easton, MD: The fourth-annual outdoor Clean Water Concert Series wraps up with The XPD's. One of the best bands in the D.C. area, the XPD's are back and ready to groove to Motown, R&B, and funk tunes that will have you on your feet! All concerts are free and open to the public. While enjoying the music, be sure to stop by the dozens of environmental and community exhibits, including CBF's, so that you can learn more about the Bay and how you can be a part of the movement to restore it.

June 26

  • Upper Marlboro, MD: Join CBF for a day at Clagett Farm for educational presentations, a tour of the farm, a service project, and a showcase of foods produced on the sustainable farm. Attendees will assist in the filling and planting of elevated garden beds designed for easier accessibility to individuals with a limited range of motion. Click here to learn more and register!

June 30, July 8, and July 15

  • Shady Side, MD: Break a sweat and help Save the Bay—join CBF in cleaning the "homes" of the next generation of Chesapeake Bay oysters! Help restore the Chesapeake's native oyster population by cleaning oyster shells. We'll be shaking off the dirt and debris on shells so baby oysters can successfully grow on them. This "shell shaking" event is a bit of a workout but a fun, hands-on experience. With lifting involved, it is not recommended for individuals with bad backs or other health concerns. A tour of our restoration center will follow the shell shaking. Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


The Importance of Clean Water to Herd Health

Nordstrom April 2016On his first week on the job as a veterinarian back in 1993, Scott Nordstrom treated a case that would stick with him the rest of his life. Shockingly, half of a herd of cattle he examined had died. It turned out that they had been struck by Bovine Viral Disease (BVD), a fatal condition transmitted from the intestines of one animal to the mouth of another.

So Nordstrom set about finding out how they got the disease. The next week, he was called to a farm just upstream with another case of BVD. He traced the source of the outbreak to that operation. "The stream carried the pathogens downstream, spreading it from one farm to the next," according to Nordstrom.

Since then, he's found time and again that as long as cattle are allowed into waterways they are at risk of catching diseases from farms upstream. "The biosecurity program for your cattle herd is no better than the worst farm upstream," says Nordstrom, who is Director of Cattle Technical Services for an animal health company. "If there is a disease outbreak in the herd upstream or even if they are just carriers of infectious organisms and they defecate in the stream, your animals are at risk if they drink from that stream."

Nordstrom travels all over the country to test vaccines for his animal health company. "In the large operations I have been on, they would never, ever, consider having their animals exposed to a stream or any other body of water," he says. "It's just too risky—for both livestock and people."

"Clearly, at least 50 percent of all cattle diseases in the Chesapeake Bay watershed are transmitted through the fecal-oral pathway," stresses Nordstrom. "Several of the big diseases in cattle are carried by water. These include BVD, E.coli, salmonella, leptospirosis, and mastitis." Symptoms of these diseases include fever, lethargy, dehydration, abortion, and death.

Vaccinating animals is a first line of defense against many diseases. But Nordstrom stresses that "the second line of defense is to fence livestock out of potentially infected waters."

There are many programs that include funding and technical assistance to help producers fence waterways and provide alternative sources of water for drinking. Nordstrom participated in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program on his own farm. "We did it for herd health reasons and, besides, I feel good that the water leaving our farm is not going to infect animals downstream," he says.

—Bobby Whitescarver  
Whitescarver lives in Swoope, Va. For more information, visit his website.

Learn more about how farmers across the watershed are working to improve both water quality and farm productivity in our Farmers' Success Stories series.

 


Photo of the Week: No Better Place on Earth Than Here

SharonSylvia

Sunset on the Great Wicomico River, just after witnessing a large pod of dolphins playing near Reedville. An awesome day from start to finish.

I grew up spending weekends in Reedville on the Northern Neck. My memories of crabbing, fishing, and swimming were so wonderful. I bought a cottage on Whays Creek in 2002 to continue the family tradition. We spend every weekend exploring the Chesapeake Bay—kayaking, fishing, and taking photos of sunrises and sunsets! We love the Chespeake Bay and the peace and beauty she provides.

There is no better place on earth than here.

—Sharon Sylvia

Ensure that Sharon and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


This Week in the Watershed

Fish-kill-1200
Fish kills are one of the terrible consequences of dead zones. Photo by John Surrick/CBF Staff.

For far too long, dead zones have plagued the Chesapeake Bay every summer. This week it was forecast that this summer's dead zone will be average to slightly below average. At first glance, this might appear to be good news. Upon closer inspection however, the status quo is unacceptable. On what planet is it good news for a body of water the size of 2.3 million Olympic-size swimming pools to exist that chokes all life out of it? Work must continue to reduce pollution and restore water quality in local rivers, streams, and the Chesapeake Bay.

There are many occasions in the fight for clean water when good news needs to be tempered by the reality that much work is left to be done. Two weeks ago, CBF witnessed amazing water clarity in the Severn River, along with an abundance of underwater grasses and active critters. View these signs of progress in this inspiring video:

Just this week however, an algal bloom popped up in the Severn. The work to save the Bay and it's rivers and streams is extremely delicate in nature. But we can take heart that the Bay is showing signs the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint is working. And now is the time to accelerate our efforts. With the support of thousands of Bay-loving individuals across the Bay region, we will do just that.

This Week in the Watershed: Dead Zone Forecast, A Forgotten Fishery, and Paddler Activists

  • Bacteria loads in three local watersheds of Virginia's York River found high concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria and enterococcus, bacteria which can cause infections in humans. (Daily Press—VA)
  • Students in Hampton Roads are diving head first into the world of oyster restoration. (Daily Press—VA)
  • It's still early in the crab season, but numbers are up so far, boosting the local economy. (Star Democrat—MD)
  • American shad, a largely forgotten fishery, is experiencing a steep drop-off in the number of fish making it to spawning grounds, despite the investment in fish lifts at dams. (Bay Journal)
  • Improvements to wastewater treatment plants are well ahead of schedule, largely due to technological upgrades at treatment plants. (Baltimore Sun—MD)
  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that the dead zone on the Bay this year is predicted to be average to slightly smaller than average. (Capital Gazette—MD) Bonus: CBF Statement
  • Residents of Maryland's Eastern Shore are resisting the proliferation of massive chicken houses, which they argue have negative impacts on public health, property values, and the environment. (Daily Times—MD)
  • More than 250 paddlers descended on Baltimore's Inner Harbor demanding clean water. (Bay Journal)
  • Farmer and conservationist Bobby Whitescarver is teaching others how to effectively steward their land. (News Leader—VA)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

Throughout June

June 18

  • Easton, MD: The fourth-annual outdoor Clean Water Concert Series continues with the U.S. Navy Band Sea Chanters. The Navy's official chorus will perform pieces ranging from Broadway tunes to sea chanteys and everything in between; top-notch entertainment you won't want to miss! All concerts are free and open to the public. While enjoying the music, be sure to stop by the dozens of environmental and community exhibits, including CBF's, so that you can learn more about the Bay and how you can be a part of the movement to restore it.

June 24

  • Shady Side, MD: Break a sweat and help Save the Bay—join CBF in cleaning the "homes" of the next generation of Chesapeake Bay oysters! Help restore the Chesapeake's native oyster population by cleaning oyster shells. We'll be shaking off the dirt and debris on shells so baby oysters can successfully grow on them. This "shell shaking" event is a bit of a workout but a fun, hands-on experience. With lifting involved, it is not recommended for individuals with bad backs or other health concerns. A tour of our restoration center will follow the shell shaking. Click here to register!

June 25

  • Easton, MD: The fourth-annual outdoor Clean Water Concert Series wraps up with The XPD's. One of the best bands in the D.C. area, the XPD's are back and ready to groove to Motown, R&B, and funk tunes that will have you on your feet! All concerts are free and open to the public. While enjoying the music, be sure to stop by the dozens of environmental and community exhibits, including CBF's, so that you can learn more about the Bay and how you can be a part of the movement to restore it.

June 26

  • Upper Marlboro, MD: Join CBF for a day at Clagett Farm for educational presentations, a tour of the farm, a service project, and a showcase of foods produced on the sustainable farm. Attendees will assist in the filling and planting of elevated garden beds designed for easier accessibility to individuals with a limited range of motion. Click here to learn more and register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


The Best Part

A Day Seeding Four Million Oysters into the Little Choptank River

13217475_10154041521770943_2648218779140892054_o
Crossing the Bay to plant four million oysters (weighing almost 30 tons) in the Little Choptank River!

"There's just something about being on the water . . . you're in a different world." Native Marylander and CBF oyster restoration volunteer Jim Ridgell is standing on the bow of the Patricia Campbell, our oyster restoration vessel, when he says this, staring out at the flat, endless Bay stretched out before us. We're on our way back in after spending the first sunny day in a string of wet weather planting oysters in the Little Choptank River off the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Ridgell
Jim Ridgell, a native Marylander who week after week for the past 10 years has been coming out to our Oyster Restoration Center to volunteer with us.

As a CBF oyster volunteer for close to 10 years, this is hardly Ridgell's first trip. In fact, for roughly a decade now, Ridgell has been coming out to our Oyster Restoration Center in Shady Side, Maryland, to clean shell, load up oysters, or whatever else needs doing. "It's not about the oysters so much," says Ridgell. "It's about helping the Bay—something that's given me so much in my life. It's about giving back to something you love."

And give back he does. On this trip alone, we planted four million oysters (or 27 tons!) onto a 1.9-acre reef we're helping to build with partners as part of a network of reefs in the Little Choptank Sanctuary. By summer's end, we hope to plant roughly 25 million baby oysters across the

Planting
Oysters are moved on a conveyer belt to the bow of the boat where they are spread across the water below.

sanctuary, which will mean incredible things for the Bay. In addition to providing critical habitat for critters like fish and crabs, oyster reefs do much for water quality, with one adult oyster able to filter and clean up to 50 gallons of water a day

Restoring the Bay is intrinsically tied to restoring its native oyster population, and so in 1997, CBF started its oyster restoration program. "The realization by the 1990s that oysters were so critical to the Bay ecosystem and that their numbers were down 99 percent inspired the effort," says CBF's Director of Fisheries and founder of its oyster restoration program Bill Goldsborough. As oyster restoration in the Bay started to take shape in the ’90s, different conservation groups and agencies assumed different roles with CBF focusing on public outreach and engagement through oyster gardening, education, and other programs. "Involving citizens in the work is essential. You're forging a constituency for restoration," says Goldsborough.    

Spreader
At the end of the conveyer belt, the oysters go through a spreader that evenly distributes them across the water.

Later, in 2002, the addition of the 60-foot Patricia Campbell vessel "changed our game completely," says Karl Willey, manager of CBF's Maryland Oyster Restoration Program. With her unique way of planting millions of oysters in less than an hour via a conveyer belt, which connects to a spreader at the bow of the boat that evenly distributes the oysters across a reef, the Patricia Campbell is "one of a kind," says Willey. "There's no other boat quite like it." Now with 250 volunteer oyster gardeners and the Patricia Campbell, we're planting between 26 and 30 million oysters in Maryland waters a year.

Karl
"Patricia Campbell" Captain and Maryland Oyster Restoration Manager Karl Willey at the end of a satisfying day on the water.

There are no words between us as we motor back in at day's end. Silently soaking up the rare appearance of the sun and lulled into a satisfied tired with muddied hands by our side and the comforting hum of the Patricia Campbell's diesel engines. Four million oysters in the water has a way of making you feel utterly and completely gratified. But then again, there's just something about being on the water.

—Text and Photos by Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

 

Click here to learn more and to watch a video of the Little Choptank oyster planting.

And sign up to become an oyster volunteer like Jim Ridgell!

 


Photo of the Week: Truly an Awesome Experience

IMG_1204In late May, I met a friend of mine and we decided to go sit on the beach . . . As soon as we saw the water we were in shock. For the past three years I have lived on the Chesapeake Bay right near Breezy Point Marina, and I had never seen so many horseshoe crabs. Even neighbors who have spent 50+ years in the neighborhood had never seen anything like it. There were clumps of two to five horseshoe crabs mating. It was truly an awesome experience.

The Chesapeake Bay is important to me for many reasons. The Bay provides food for families, careers for others, and a great place to live. My boyfriend has been mapping out stormwater sites all over the state of Maryland and that has helped clean up the water. I love being able to go out on a boat and catch a healthy dinner. I love being able to bring friends to my house and let them experience life on the Bay. I absolutely love living on the Chesapeake Bay. 

—Breanne Smith 

Ensure that Breanne and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

IMG_1195


This Week in the Watershed

Ctbd-16-2
These Cub Scout volunteers on Clean the Bay Day are a small sampling of the many inspiring volunteers fighting for clean water throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

These days, it seems like there's a special day, week, or month set aside to recognize and celebrate everything: causes, issues, and occasionally, culinary creations. While there is nothing wrong with National Donut Day, for too long there wasn't a time to pause and appreciate the country's largest estuary. To change this trend, the legislatures of Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania chose the week of June 4-12 to celebrate the first Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week.

This week for the Chesapeake is a time not only to celebrate the beauty, bounty, and recreation the Bay provides but also to remember that the fight to save the Bay and its rivers and streams is a marathon, not a sprint. In this long, hard, endurance race we are inspired by the many stalwart fighters for clean water, such as Bernie Fowler. The 92-year old former Maryland state senator has dedicated his life to cleaning the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. His efforts have made an indelible impact, and his never-give-up attitude serves as motivation to a new generation of Bay advocates.

These advocates are found across the watershed, from Bonnie Kersta, a CBF oyster gardener volunteer, to farmers implementing best management practices for clean water, to the over 6,000 volunteers across Virginia who cleaned 440 miles of streamline and shore, removing over 138,000 pounds of harmful debris on Clean the Bay Day. All this hard work, from these volunteers and others, is making a difference. Recently, the Bay has shown encouraging signs of recovery, with the resurgence of underwater grasses, horseshoe crabs, and the blue crab population. Despite these positive trends, the fight to save the Bay is far from over. But with the implementation of the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint and the amazing contributions of inspiring individuals, the Bay is well on its way.

This Week in the Watershed: #AreYouBayAware, A Successful Cleaning, and Resilient Horseshoe Crabs

  • Farmers in Virginia are helping to save the Bay through implementing best management practices for clean water on their farms. (Daily Progress—VA)
  • Bernie Fowler, a legendary champion for the Chesapeake Bay and Patuxent River, is an inspiration for clean water fighters. (Daily Times—VA)
  • This week is the first Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week, a joint effort by Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania to promote national appreciation for the largest estuary in the country. (Daily Press—VA)
  • A Pennsylvania legislator has proposed a new water fee to raise revenue for water restoration efforts throughout the Keystone State. (Bay Journal)
  • CBF's 28th Annual Clean the Bay Day was a resounding success, with over 6,000 volunteers participating across Virginia and over 138,000 pounds of harmful debris removed. (Progress Index—VA) Bonus: CBF Press Release
  • Horseshoe crabs are making a comeback throughout the Chesapeake Bay. (Bay Journal)
  • Bonnie Kersta is a finalist for this year's COX Conserves Heroes Program for her volunteer work with CBF's oyster gardening program. If Bonnie wins, CBF will receive a $10,000 grant. You can help by voting online, and you only need to vote once between now and June 17. (Williamsburg Yorktown Daily—VA) Click here to vote for Bonnie!

What's Happening around the Watershed?

Throughout June

June 11

  • Baltimore, MD: Join CBF and the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore for a Healthy Harbor paddle and rally to support the environmental restoration of this ecosystem and show that we value the health of our city, our harbor, our Bay, and our streams. Pre-register at BaltimoreFloatilla.com. 

June 18

  • Easton, MD: The fourth annual outdoor Clean Water Concert Series continues with the U.S. Navy Band Sea Chanters. The Navy's official chorus will perform pieces ranging from Broadway tunes to sea chanteys and everything in between. Top-notch entertainment you won't want to miss! All concerts are free and open to the public. While enjoying the music, be sure to stop by the dozens of environmental and community exhibits, including CBF's, so that you can learn more about the Bay and how you can be a part of the movement to restore it.

June 24

  • Shady Side, MD: Break a sweat and help Save the Bay—join CBF in cleaning the "homes" of the next generation of Chesapeake Bay oysters! Help restore the Chesapeake's native oyster population by cleaning oyster shells. We'll be shaking off the dirt and debris on shells so baby oysters can successfully grow on them. This "shell shaking" event is a bit of a workout but a fun, hands-on experience. With lifting involved, it is not recommended for individuals with bad backs or other health concerns. A tour of our restoration center will follow the shell shaking. Click here to register!

June 25

  • Easton, MD: The fourth annual outdoor Clean Water Concert Series wraps up with The XPD's. One of the best bands in the D.C. area, the XPD's are back and ready to groove to Motown, R&B, and funk tunes that will have you on your feet! All concerts are free and open to the public. While enjoying the music, be sure to stop by the dozens of environmental and community exhibits, including CBF's, so that you can learn more about the Bay and how you can be a part of the movement to restore it.

June 26

  • Upper Marlboro, MD: Join CBF for a day at Clagett Farm for educational presentations, a tour of the farm, a service project, and a showcase of foods produced on the sustainable farm. Attendees will assist in the filling and planting of elevated garden beds designed for easier accessibility to individuals with a limited range of motion. Click here to learn more and register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


Making a Difference with Día de la Bahía


Haz clic aquí para la versión en Español.

Oscar Contreras
Oscar Contreras and family.

Among the thousands of volunteers across Virginia who came together on Clean the Bay Day, this year there was a big presence from the Hispanic community. Like every year of the past 28 years, volunteers got together to clean up trash from beaches and parks with rivers and streams that reach the Chesapeake Bay. But for the first time we launched bilingual sites for this Virginian tradition, which is now also known as Día de la Bahía.

Oscar Contreras took his two kids to Pocahontas State Park, where from a canoe they picked up trash. "Across human history, the perfect place to start a civilization has always been near rivers and beautiful places. These rivers feed the Bay, taking water with them. Unfortunately, they also carry trash. That affects the Bay and the environment," Contreras said in his radio program Community Focus on Radio Poder WBTK.

The Richmond area had two bilingual sites in this massive cleanup campaign, including Ancarrow's Landing and Pocahontas State Park. In total, more than 50 volunteers from the Hispanic community helped out, with most of them coming from Richmond's Sacred Heart Center.

Karina Murcia and her mother Dania Hernandez
Karina Murcia and her mother Dania Hernandez.

It was early on a hot Saturday morning, but the volunteers still came. They wanted to take care of the environment and animals, to raise awareness, to feel proud after helping, and to contribute to the community.

Many people came with the whole family, picking up bottles, plastic, fishing line, clothing, aluminum, and even construction materials.Dania Hernández was surprised by how much trash she found at Ancarrow's Landing. "It's a lot of trash. It's sad how people can destroy the environment," Hernández said. But she hopes that she's making a difference. "The people who are here fishing see that we are picking up trash. I hope that we're raising awareness so that they don't just leave their trash behind, but instead pick up any they have with them."

Marvin C (pink shirt) and Friends
Marvin C. (far right) and friends.

Karina Murcia is nine years old and was very happy to help. "I like what we're doing. It's really important to me," Karina says. "The animals need to live, and if they eat bad things they could die."

Alicia is only 13 years old, but she knows exactly why she came to help. "We are cleaning up because eventually if it rains it's going to wash off to the river. Fishing season is coming and if the fish eats it then we are going to eat it," Alicia says. "Because the weather and the erosion will take this trash into the water, it's going to be dangerous."

Many volunteers said they felt really good after the cleanup, including Marvin Cáceres, originally from Honduras. "After you finish you feel proud of yourself, just because you know that you are saving nature," according to Cáceres. "It is my first time doing this, I wasn't familiar with the Foundation or the program. But I really like it because we can show our kids and they are going to pass it on. Save the Bay, brother!"

—Ana Martínez

6a00d8341bfb5353ef01b8d1f50267970c


Haciendo la Diferencia en el Día de la Bahía

 
Click here for the English translation of the following blog post.

Oscar Contreras
Oscar Contreras y su familia.

Entre los miles de voluntarios que se reunieron para Clean the Bay Day en Virginia, este año contamos con un gran acto de presencia de la comunidad hispana. De hecho, por primera vez a esta tradición se le conoce como Día de la Bahía. Como cada año por 28 años consecutivos, los voluntarios se reunieron para limpiar basura tirada en las playas y parques con ríos y arroyos que llegan a la Bahía de Chesapeake.

Oscar Contreras llevó a sus hijos a Pocahontas State Park, donde desde una canoa buscaron remover basura. “En la historia humana los lugares perfectos para comenzar una civilización siempre han sido alrededor de los ríos y lugares hermosos. Estos ríos se desembocan en la Bahía, llevan agua, pero lamentablemente también llevan la basura. Eso afecta a la bahía y al medio ambiente,” dice Contreras en su programa de radio enfoque a la comunidad en Radio Poder WBTK.

Marvin C (pink shirt) and Friends
De derecho a izquierda: Marvin C., Juan Ortiz y Ricardo O.

Este año en la campaña de limpieza masiva contamos con dos sitios bilingües: Ancarrow's Landing y Pocahontas State Park. En total más de 50 voluntarios de la comunidad hispana del área de Richmond asistieron a ayudar. La gran mayoría vinieron de Sacred Heart Center en Richmond.

Era un sábado muy temprano en la mañana y con mucho calor. Pero a los voluntarios presentes les motivaron diferentes cosas, desde cuidar el medio ambiente y los animales, crear más conciencia, sentir orgullo después de ayudar y aportar positivamente a la comunidad.

Dania Hernández estaba impresionada por la cantidad de basura que encontró en Ancarrow’s Landing.  “Es mucha basura. Es lamentable como las personas pueden destruir el medio ambiente,” dice Hernández. Pero espera que está haciendo la diferencia. “La gente que está aquí pescando, nos ve que estamos recogiendo basura, y espero que con esto estamos creando conciencia que no la tiren y que recojan la basura que tengan consigo.”

Karina Murcia and her mother Dania Hernandez
Karina Murcia y su mamá Dania Hernández.

Muchos llegaron con toda la familia, recogiendo botellas, plástico, hilo de pesca, ropa, aluminio, y hasta desechos de construcción.

Karina Murcia tiene nueve años de edad y estaba feliz de poder ayudar ese día. “Me gusta lo que estamos haciendo, es muy importante para mí,” dice Karina. “Los animales necesitan vivir, si comen cosas malas para ellos se pueden morir.” 

Alicia tiene apenas trece años y sabe perfectamente por que vino a ayudar. “Estamos limpiando porque eventualmente cuando llueva la basura va a llegar al río, y así llega a los peces, la temporada de pesca viene y nos vamos a comer esa basura,” dice Alicia. “La lluvia y la erosión harán que esa basura llegue al agua y será peligroso.”

Los voluntarios se sentían muy bien al final de la campaña de limpieza, como Marvin Cáceres originario de Honduras. “Nos sentimos orgullosos porque nos damos cuenta que estamos salvando la naturaleza," según Cáceres. “Es la primera vez que hago esto, no estaba familiarizado con la Fundación Chesapeake Bay ni con el programa. Pero me gusta mucho porque podemos enseñar a nuestros hijos y ellos van a empezar una tradición. Invito a todos a salvar la Bahía, brother!”

—Ana Martínez

6a00d8341bfb5353ef01b8d1f50267970c
 

 

 


Life on the Chickahominy

Late spring is a heady time on the Chickahominy River. Thick cypress trees with knobby knees rise out of dark, tannin-stained waters. Vibrant yellow prothonotary warblers flit among the greening trees and blooming wildflowers. Occasionally, the river's surface explodes as a toothy chain pickerel makes a meal out of an unwary fish. The river, which winds through the forests to the east of Richmond, courses across classic Southern swamps on Virginia's Coastal Plain. 

In mid-May, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation partnered with Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality to canoe the Chickahominy with the Watershed Educators Institute, made up of field educators from organizations across Virginia. Below is just a glimpse of that beautiful day out on the water . . . 

 —Text and photos by Kenny Fletcher, CBF's Virginia Communications Coordinator

1
Paddlers gaze up at an osprey nest high in an old cypress tree. Osprey pairs usually mate for life and often return to the same nest year after year.
2
River and forest merge on the Chickahominy, allowing intrepid canoeists to explore watery passageways among the trees.
4
CBF Educator Alex McCrickard examines a yellow drake mayfly that had fallen into the river.
5
A feisty mud turtle comes out of its shell.
6
A fisherman shows off a bright yellow perch reeled in from a dock along the Chickahominy.
7
Field educators examine fish caught in a seine net pulled near the river's shore.
8
A small colorful sunfish pulled from the Chickahominy shines in the May light.