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November 2016

Photo of the Week: Corrotoman Cormorants

IMG_7890
This picture was taken at the mouth of the Corrotoman River where it empties into the Rappahannock River. We were returning home from fishing for stripers when we passed the marker with the Double-crested Cormorants getting ready to settle in for the night.

—Kathy Haurand

Ensure that Kathy and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


This Week in the Watershed: A Forgotten Fish

Menhaden photo from EPR
Despite their critical link in the food web, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission raised the menhaden catch quota this week. Photo by CBF Staff.

They might not be a common feature on dinner plates, but menhaden are often called "the most important fish in the sea." A small, oily fish packed with nutritional value, menhaden are a critical link in the marine food web. Valuable fish like rockfish rely heavily on menhaden as do whales, osprey, and other marine mammals and seabirds. Despite their critical role in the Bay's ecology, menhaden face an uncertain future.

In 2012, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission cut the menhaden catch quota by 20 percent. Just last year the quota was raised 10 percent, and this week, another 6.5 percent.

As with all fisheries management, science should be at the foundation in all decision making. And with a fishery as critical as menhaden, managing the long-term sustainability of the species should include considerations for their ecological role in addition to the economic value. With the Atlantic menhaden population at eight percent of historic levels and the science still out on taking their ecological value fully into account, now is not the time to increase the quota even further.

Saving the bay involves not only cleaning the water but ensuring the wildlife that depends on it are thriving. With the full implementation of the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, and responsible, science-based fisheries management, we can leave a healthy Chesapeake Bay to future generations.

This Week in the Watershed: An Important Fish, Kicking Cans, and Spooky Forests

  • Advocates for menhaden, often dubbed "the most important fish in the sea," received unwelcome news, when it's quota was increased 6.5 percent. (Bay Journal) Bonus: CBF Statement
  • The push to address stormwater runoff in the Keystone state faces several major roadblocks. (Bay Journal)
  • The controversial Four Seasons development on Maryland's Kent Island is still facing legal resistance. (Star Democrat—MD)
  • We couldn't agree more with this editorial lampooning the decision to kick the can down the road on stormwater pollution reduction efforts in Maryland's Anne Arundel County. (Capital Gazette—MD)
  • Wetland scientists are studying the increasing prevalence of what they call "ghost forests"—forests that have been overtaken by sea level rise. (Daily Press—VA)
  • Pennsylvania has plans for cleaning its rivers and streams, but some are questioning whether they are providing the necessary funding to bring their plans to life. (Lancaster Farming—PA)
  • With millions of dollars spent on stream restoration projects throughout the watershed, some are questioning the efficacy of the investment. (Bay Journal)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

October 29

  • Woodsboro, MD: Help CBF plant over 1,000 trees and shrubs along Israel Creek on a beef cattle farm in Frederick County. Approximately 5,000 feet of stream banks will be planted resulting in six acres of riparian buffer. Israel Creek is in the Monocacy River watershed which flows to the Potomac River then to the Chesapeake Bay. Click here to register!

November 3

  • Easton, MD: Oyster season is here, and whether or not you're a fan of eating the Bay's beloved bivalve, you've probably noticed a growing number of farmed oyster varieties available in local seafood markets and restaurants on the Eastern Shore. There's no denying that oyster farming, also known as "aquaculture," is on the rise in Maryland. Join us for a forum on this rising trend to learn more about oyster aquaculture from experts in the field. The event is free, but click here to register!

November 5

  • Smithsburg, MD: Join CBF at this recently completed stream restoration project on Little Antietam Creek and help us with the final stages of restoring the stream banks and floodplain. Volunteers will install live stakes consisting of willow cuttings as well as native trees and shrubs.  Learn about stream restoration techniques used throughout the region by touring this recently completed project and lend your hand for the final touches. Click here to register!

November 6

  • Annapolis, MD: Join approximately 25,000 runners and walkers crossing the 4.35-mile Chesapeake Bay Bridge as part of the third annual Across the Bay 10k. The dual-span bridge doesn’t allow pedestrian traffic at any other time of the year, so this is a unique opportunity—and the view is amazing! CBF is an official charity partner of the Across the Bay 10K, and we are excited to offer Charity Bibs as part of that partnership. It's a win-win...you get a guaranteed entry into the race and help save the Bay with a donation to CBF! Get your charity bib now!

November 12

  • Virginia Beach, VA: Volunteer with CBF at Calypso Bar & Grill! We will be celebrating our favorite bivalve, the oyster, with an oyster roast. Volunteers are needed to help recycle the oyster shells, pour beverages, and take tickets. A portion of the proceeds will help CBF in its work to save the Bay! To volunteer, please email or call Tanner Council at tcouncil@cbf.org or 757-622-1964.

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


Getting to Know the James River

Haz clic aquí para la versión en Español.

Earlier this week, about 15 leaders in Central Virginia's Hispanic community and their families spent a sunny fall afternoon on the James River with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. For many of the participants, it was their first time in a boat on the river. They saw bald eagles and blue crabs, and discussed ways to get involved in restoring the James and the Chesapeake Bay.

Join us in our journey along the river through the following photos.

1
Petersburg Hispanic Liaison Director Aracely Harris holds a blue crab. "I learned about a lot of ways that we can help our environment," Harris said, adding that she hopes to continue to work with CBF in the future. "This will be a great opportunity for everybody."

2
A group helps haul aboard a trawl net as part of a survey of life in the river. "You can see the joy of kids learning and exploring," said Oscar Contreras, a host at Radio Poder WBTK. "A lot of the Latino community is made up of young families."

DSC_0181
CBF Educator Eric Wiegandt (left) examines fish caught in the net while Efrain Carcamo and Alexander Trejo look on with their daughters. 

3
Mary Trejo, 8, is amazed by a hogchoker fish caught in the trawl net.

4
Roberto Trejo, 16, watches the James River from the CBF education vessel Baywatcher. "It's wonderful to see the beauty that we have in this area," Contreras said. "A lot of us just go to work, do our daily routines. But it's nice to enjoy what God has created."

5
CBF staff and local community leaders gather at the end of a beautiful afternoon on the water. Latino families are one of the highest user groups of the James River, said Tanya González, executive director of the Sacred Heart Center. Earlier this year, her organization worked with CBF on the Día de la Bahía riverside litter cleanup. "It's a matter of connecting with people and offering them opportunities to plug in," González said.

—Text and photos by Kenny Fletcher, CBF's Virginia Communications Coordinator

 


Conociendo el Río James

Click here for the English translation of the following blog post.

Esta semana, 15 líderes locales de la comunidad Hispana pasaron una tarde soleada y hermosa en el río James con la Fundación Chesapeake Bay. Para muchos esta fue su primera vez en un barco en este río. Vieron águilas y cangrejos y hablaron de como todos podemos colaborar en limpiar el río James y la bahía de Chesapeake.

Acompáñanos en nuestro viaje por el río a través de las siguientes fotos. 

1
Aracely Harris, directora de la oficina de enlaces Hispanos de Petersburg, examina un cangrejo azul. “Aprendí mucho sobre cómo podemos ayudar el medio ambiente,” dijo Harris. Espera poder trabajar más con la fundación en el futuro. “Va a ser una gran oportunidad para todos.”

2
Un grupo recoge una red para estudiar la vida acuática del río. “Ves la alegría de niños aprendiendo y explorando,” dijo Oscar Contreras, locutor en Radio Poder WBTK. “Hay muchas familias jóvenes en la comunidad Latina.”

DSC_0181
Eric Wiegandt de la Fundación examina peces mientras Efrain Carcamo y Alexander Trejo observan con sus hijas. 

3
Mary Trejo, 8, se queda asombrada por un pez plano que pescaron en la red.

4
Roberto Trejo, 16, observa el rio James desde el barco Baywatcher de la Fundación Chesapeake Bay. “Es maravilloso ver la belleza que tenemos en esta área,” dijo Contreras. “Muchos vamos al trabajo, pasamos por nuestras rutinas cotidianas. Pero es bueno ver lo que Dios ha creado.”

5
La Fundación Chesapeake Bay y los líderes locales y familias se juntan después de pasar una buena tarde en el barco. Las familias Latinas usan mucho el río James, dijo Tanya González, directora del Centro Sagrado Corazón. Su organización trabajó con la Fundación hace unos meses para limpiar basura del río durante el Día de la Bahía. “Lo importante es conectar con gente y ofrecerles oportunidades para contribuir,” dijo González.

—Kenny Fletcher

 


CBF Building Exhibits a Resilient Future

The following first appeared in The Virginian-Pilot.

Brock_fb
CBF's Brock Environmental Center in Virginia Beach, VA was built with climate change in mind. Photo by Chris Gorri/CBF Staff.

This year's rough weather has battered Hampton Roads. It's not just the summer's brutal heat wave. It's the deluge of seven inches of rain that fell in just two hours in July, the high waters that surrounded buildings when Hurricane Hermine hit over Labor Day, and the 13 inches of rain that fell overnight in late September, or the massive amounts of rain that accompanied Hurricane Matthew.

Newscasts and the newspaper have been filled with images of water lapping around houses, submerged cars, and rowboats navigating flooded streets.

It's a window into the future.

But since opening nearly two years ago, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Brock Environmental Center in Virginia Beach has remained undamaged. Sometimes, even as rains fell and the winds howled, locals gathered there to watch storms roll in over the Lynnhaven River. They knew that the CBF building is climate-change ready, designed to be resilient in the face of the toughest weather.

"After a bad storm, community members visit the Brock Center to see how it weathered," said Brock Center Manager Chris Gorri. "Severe weather becomes a teachable moment. People ask questions about the wind turbines or want to see how high the water is on the Lynnhaven River." Some want to learn how they can adapt their own homes to better cope with recurrent flooding.

Designed and built to withstand the effects some of the worst weather in the world, the center is a model for a region increasingly at risk. According to Old Dominion University's Center for Sea Level Rise, sea levels have risen 14 inches in Hampton Roads since 1930. Low lying cities, rising waters, and sinking lands are why.

The Brock Center is ready. It is raised 14 feet above sea level, staying high and dry during flooding. Its windows can withstand a collision with a two-by-four hurled at 110 miles per hour. Its grounds are designed to eliminate runoff.

Gravel paths and permeable roadways and parking areas let water soak into the ground. The Brock Center's one-of-a-kind rainwater treatment system filters rain falling on the center's roof for use as drinking water.

The building is set far back from the river, with a wide sandy buffer of grasses and shrubs that absorbs storm surges.

In early October, Hurricane Matthew brought strong winds and up to 12 inches of rain in the region, inundating some roadways under several feet of water. Schools closed, power was out for days, and officials urged cutbacks on water usage because of stressed sewer systems.

At the Brock Center, that storm flipped over benches and knocked over a large sturdy sign. But the strongest flooding seen at Brock came a year earlier, as storms linked to Hurricane Joaquin sent water from the Lynnhaven River rushing knee-deep under the raised building. Neither storm damaged the building or its wind turbines.

The Brock Center also fights back against climate change with its residential wind turbines and solar panels, which produce far more energy than the building consumes and send clean excess energy to the grid. The center's energy conservation allows it to use 80 percent less energy than a typical office building of its size.

Thanks to these innovations, earlier this year the Brock Center achieved one of the toughest building standards in the world. Living Building Challenge certification from the International Living Future Institute requires a building to produce more energy than it uses over the course of 12 consecutive months and meet a host of other strict criteria.

As we increasingly grapple with the effects of climate change, the Brock Center shines brightly as a solution. Sustainability means more than just energy efficiency. It means being able to sustain the extremes nature can and will throw at us. With Brock, we're proving that we have a choice to raise the bar, reduce pollution, and adapt to climate change.

And, we can do it in comfort and beauty.

—Mary Tod Winchester, CBF's Vice President for Administration


Photo of the Week: So Many Things That We Love

IMG_1580At Suggetts Point in Warsaw, Virginia.

My husband and I live near the James River and have a place on the Rappahannock River. We are avid kayakers and participate in all forms of water fun. The tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay are where we spend most of our time, but we realize the health of the Bay is critical to the health of so many things that we love.

Education is the only way to ensure the Bay is there for our descendants.

—Amy Bram Sowers

Ensure that Amy, her husband, and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


This Week in the Watershed: A Growing Source of Pollution

Schlyer-1200 (2)
Polluted runoff is one of the major sources of pollution growing in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Photo by Krista Schlyer/iLCP.

Seventeen million. That's the number of people living in the Chesapeake Bay region. This presents a natural obstacle to clean water, most notably in efforts to reduce polluted runoff. A major source of pollution that continues to grow, water flowing off our streets, parking lots, and building rooftops, picks up all kinds of pollutants like pet waste, sediment, fertilizers, pesticides, oil, and automotive fluids. As more houses, roads, and shopping centers are built, more of this polluted runoff makes its way through gutters and storm drains to the nearest river or stream and eventually, the Chesapeake Bay.

Given this reality, it's disappointing Maryland's Department of Environment is allowing localities to skirt their responsibilities by not funding efforts to reduce polluted runoff. While polluted runoff improvements might not top the list of most compelling government expenditures, failing to make this investment will all but guarantee clean water will remain out of reach.

The more impermeable surfaces we develop, saving the Bay and its rivers and streams will only become more difficult. If we want to leave a legacy of clean water to future generations, we need to fully implement the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. With 17 million residents living in the Chesapeake Bay watershed—certain to only balloon further—failing to invest in efforts to reduce polluted runoff is a mistake we cannot afford.

P.S.- Our fall version of e-news just hit inboxes yesterday. Check out these state and program updates! Pennsylvania | Maryland | Eastern Shore of Maryland | Virginia | Hampton Roads | Federal Affairs

This Week in the Watershed: Reducing Runoff, Hungry Geese, and Pumping Water

  • Hampton Roads is taking an innovative approach to impede the slowly rising sea. (Washington Post—D.C.)
  • Canadian geese aren't receiving a very warm welcome in the Anacostia River wetlands, as they are hindering efforts to restore tidal marshes. (Bay Journal)
  • Harry Campbell, CBF Pennsylvania Executive Director, spoke to the Pennsylvania Senate Environmental Resources and Energy, and Agriculture and Rural Affairs committees, advocating for a sustainable funding stream for Pennsylvania's clean water reboot. (CBF Press Statement)
  • The giant blue crab caught on a CBF Education trip in the lower Susquehanna Flats last week is still turning heads! (Bay Journal)
  • Throughout Maryland, many localities are not properly funding measures to reduce polluted runoff. (Baltimore Sun—MD) Bonus: CBF Press Statement
  • The proliferation of chicken houses on an industrial scale across the Eastern Shore has raised economic, environmental, and public health concerns among residents. (Bay Journal)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

October 22

  • Virginia Beach, VA: Come on out to a sustainable living expo. This fun, family-friendly event is designed as a showcase for eco-friendly, sustainable solutions, crafts, and food, with many participating organizations. See ideas you can use at your home from edible landscaping and urban gardening to beekeeping and alternative energy. CBF is also looking for volunteers to help staff a CBF display and share information with attendees at the expo. This event is suitable for all volunteer experience levels, so come out, share, and learn. Email or call Tanner Council to inquire and volunteer at tcouncil@cbf.org or call 757-622-1964.

October 29

  • Woodsboro, MD: Help CBF plant over 1,000 trees and shrubs along Israel Creek on a beef cattle farm in Frederick County. Approximately 5,000 feet of stream banks will be planted resulting in six acres of new riparian buffer. Israel Creek is in the Monocacy River watershed which flows to the Potomac River then to the Chesapeake Bay. Click here to register!

November 3

  • Easton, MD: Oyster season is here, and whether or not you're a fan of eating the Bay's beloved bivalve, you've probably noticed a growing number of farmed oyster varieties available in local seafood markets and restaurants on the Eastern Shore. This is a sure sign that oyster farming, also known as "aquaculture," is on the rise in Maryland. Join us for a forum on this rising trend to learn more about oyster aquaculture from experts in the field. The event is free, but click here to register!

November 5

  • Smithsburg, MD: Join CBF at this recently completed stream restoration project on Little Antietam Creek and help us with the final stages of restoring the stream banks and floodplain. Volunteers will install live stakes consisting of willow cuttings as well as native trees and shrubs.  Learn about stream restoration techniques used throughout the region by touring this recently completed project and lend your hand for the final touches. Click here to register!

November 6

  • Annapolis, MD: Join approximately 25,000 runners and walkers crossing the 4.35-mile Chesapeake Bay Bridge as part of the third annual Across the Bay 10k. The dual-span bridge doesn’t allow pedestrian traffic at any other time of the year, so this is a unique opportunity—and the view is amazing! CBF is an official charity partner of the Across the Bay 10k and we are excited to offer Charity Bibs as part of that partnership. It's a win-win...you get a guaranteed entry into the race and help save the Bay with a donation to CBF! Get your charity bib now!

November 12

  • Virginia Beach, VA: Volunteer with CBF at Calypso Bar & Grill! We will be celebrating our favorite bivalve, the oyster, with an oyster roast. Volunteers are needed to help recycle the oyster shells, pour beverages, and take tickets. A portion of the proceeds will help CBF in its work to save the Bay! To volunteer, please email or call Tanner Council at tcouncil@cbf.org or 757-622-1964.

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


Cuidando los Ríos

DSC_0588Click here for the English translation of the following blog post.

Efraín Carcamo y sus tres hijos cruzan rocas en la orilla del río James en Richmond, buscando basura que la corriente dejó entre piedras y ramas. "Este lugar es un filtro enorme," dijo Carcamo. "Atrapa mucha basura."

La familia busca metódicamente, y usan palos para recoger latas de cerveza y botellas de plástico, depositándolas en bolsas de basura. Por años, Carcamo ha repetido esta rutina varias veces al mes. Es su campaña personal para limpiar el río.

Su interés por la naturaleza empezó desde niño, cuando vivía en una finca en la sombra del volcán San Vicente en El Salvador. Desde mudarse a los Estados Unidos en 1989, ha estado fascinado con los ríos que desembocan en la Bahía de Chesapeake. "Llegué aquí y vi la belleza de este lugar y me enamoré," dijo mientras veía los pozos cristalinos del río James.  

DSC_0592Para Carcamo, cuidar los ríos también es una terapia. "Todos tenemos seres queridos que han fallecido," dijo Carcamo, quien perdió familiares en la guerra en El Salvador. La esposa de Carcamo falleció en un accidente en el 2008. Desde entonces él encuentra paz en los ríos. "Regresé a la naturaleza," dijo. "Creo que tiene el poder de consolar el alma y de cambiar muchas cosas en la vida. Creo que tiene un poder terapéutico."

Como padre, Carcamo ha enseñado el respeto de la naturaleza a sus hijas Elysha, 13 y Emaya, 11, y su hijo Eljah, 8. En los senderos de Belle Isle los niños buscan ranas y señalan donde una vez vieron un castor enorme. "Les enseño cuidar el medio ambiente," dijo Carcamo. "Ellos exploran, disfrutan, y ven con quienes comparten este planeta, no sólo personas, pero animales que debemos cuidar."

Carcamo también ha inspirado a más personas que quieren cuidar el río. "He conocido a mucha gente de todas las clases de la sociedad y todas las razas," dijo. Si le preguntan porque está limpiando, Carcamo explica que la basura daña los ríos y los animales. "Lo que digo les impacta … Regresan con sus bolsas de basura y limpian," dijo Carcamo. "Cuando se dan cuenta que alguien lo está haciendo les anima y ellos mismos lo hacen. Se siente bien."

—Kenny Fletcher, CBF's Virginia Communications Coordinator

 

 

 


Photo of the Week: Only God Paints This

JoelThiess
Just thought I'd share this fall sunset picture with you. Tide reflection in our yard down Tylerton, Smith Island.

Absolutely beautiful. Only God can paint this!

—Joel Thiess

Ensure that Joel and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


This Week in the Watershed: One Giant Crab

Crab3-cropped
CBF Educator Ian Robbins, exploring the Susquehanna Flats on a trip with Aberdeen High School students, caught a gigantic blue crab. The crab was measured at eight inches across the width of the shell—making it one of the larger crabs found in the Bay.

From dolphins, to sharks, to manatees, the Bay is always full of surprises. This week revealed yet another, as a gigantic blue crab was caught and released on a CBF education trip. In addition to this monster crab, students also observed an abundance of underwater grasses, soaring bald eagles, and countless other critters.

Witnessing the flourishing wildlife in the Bay reminds us why we love the Bay. And while giant crabs aren't caught on every CBF education trip, thousands of students join us on the water every year, leaving with a greater appreciation of the Bay and its rivers and streams.

But we can't take this national treasure for granted. These waters face a bevy of threats. To save the Bay and conserve it so future generations can also experience its natural wonders, we need to fully implement the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. Leaving a legacy of clean water will not only ensure expanded recreational opportunities, improved public health, and massive economic benefits, it will also allow our children to witness the truly priceless wonders of the Bay—from a playful pod of dolphins, to reefs of water-filtering oysters, to even a gigantic blue crab.

Sign our pledge to stand with us to restore the Bay and its rivers and all the extraordinary critters, such as the iconic blue crab, that call them home.

This Week in the Watershed: A Giant Crab, Good Stewards, and Grass Seeds

  • A giant blue crab was caught on a CBF Education trip in the lower Susquehanna Flats, near Havre de Grace, MD, causing quite a stir on social media. (WBAL—MD) Bonus: CBF Facebook Post
  • We're inspired by this story of an Eastern Shore farming family acting as good stewards over their land for generations. (Carroll County Times—MD)
  • Pennsylvania students got a taste of the Susquehanna River and the critters in its waters on a trip with CBF's Susquehanna Watershed Education Program. (Bay Journal)
  • CBF staff was hard at work finding seed pods to use for our "Grasses for the Masses" program, where volunteers grow grasses over the winter and plant them in the spring in efforts to bolster the grass population in the Bay. (Free Lance-Star—VA)
  • Two thumbs up to newly anointed Eagle Scout Brendan Leary of Alexandria, VA, who led a group of 53 volunteers in constructing 105 oyster cages to help restore the Bay's native oyster population. (The Zebra—VA)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

October 17

  • Annapolis, MD: The Annapolis VoiCeS (Volunteers as Chesapeake Stewards) class is back! Come "back-to-school" with CBF in a six-week, professionally taught course on all things clean water. Learn about Bay science and fisheries, pollution problems and solutions, and how volunteers can help restoration efforts in their local waters and the Bay. Click here to register! Deadline to register is October 13!

October 18

  • Easton, MD: The Eastern Shore VoiCeS (Volunteers as Chesapeake Stewards) class is back! Come "back-to-school" with CBF in a six-week, professionally taught course on all things clean water. Learn about Bay science and fisheries, pollution problems and solutions, and how volunteers can help restoration efforts in their local waters and the Bay. Click here to register! Deadline to register is October 13!

October 19

  • Cambridge, MD: Join us at a workshop to learn more about best management practices (BMPs) to slow and filter polluted runoff. Facilitated by expert trainers with the Chesapeake Stormwater Network, this workshop is designed for local government managers and field operators with instruction in BMP inspection, maintenance, and facility failure decision-making, Participants will increase their knowledge of effectively treating polluted runoff while complying with local, state, and federal stormwater management expectations. Networking with colleagues in neighboring Eastern Shore communities enhances opportunities to learn about locally relevant problems and solutions. Click here to register!

October 22

  • Virginia Beach, VA: Come on out to a sustainable living expo. This fun, family-friendly event is designed as a showcase for eco-friendly, sustainable solutions, crafts, and food, with many participating organizations. See ideas you can use at your home from edible landscaping and urban gardening to beekeeping and alternative energy. CBF is also looking for volunteers to help staff a CBF display and share information with attendees at the expo. This event is suitable for all volunteer experience levels, so come out, share, and learn. Email or call Tanner Council to inquire and volunteer at tcouncil@cbf.org or call 757-622-1964.

October 29

  • Woodsboro, MD: Help CBF plant over 1,000 trees and shrubs along Israel Creek on a beef cattle farm in Frederick County. Approximately 5,000 feet of stream banks will be planted resulting in six acres of new riparian buffer. Israel Creek is in the Monocacy River watershed which flows to the Potomac River then to the Chesapeake Bay. Click here to register!

November 3

  • Easton, MD: Oyster season is here, and whether or not you're a fan of eating the Bay's beloved bivalve, you've probably noticed a growing number of farmed oyster varieties available in local seafood markets and restaurants on the Eastern Shore. This is a sure sign that oyster farming, also known as "aquaculture," is on the rise in Maryland. Join us for a forum on this rising trend to learn more about oyster aquaculture from experts in the field. The event is free, but click here to register!

November 5

  • Smithsburg, MD: Join CBF at this recently completed stream restoration project on Little Antietam Creek and help us with the final stages of restoring the stream banks and floodplain. Volunteers will install live stakes consisting of willow cuttings as well as native trees and shrubs.  Learn about stream restoration techniques used throughout the region by touring this recently completed project and lend your hand for the final touches. Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate