This Week in the Watershed

Dolphins-1200
Dolphins are frequent visitors on CBF education trips. This friendly trio came to play on a recent student excursion. Photo by Ian Robbins/CBF Staff.

There are many things we love about the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams, but near the top of the list are all the wonderful critters. From delectable blue crabs, to water-filtering oysters, to the elusive river otter, there are plenty of critters to love. A fan favorite in all bodies of water where they are found, is the inquisitive, friendly, and playful dolphin. Recently, dolphins have been sighted throughout the Bay and its rivers and streams, as far north as the Magothy and Severn River north of Annapolis.

These sightings are another reminder why we love the Bay. From a breathtaking sunrise, to watching an osprey soar through the air with its dinner, to dolphins jumping out of the water, the Bay is full of pleasant surprises. We can never forget, however, that all of this beauty we witness and experience is dependent upon clean water. Indeed, many are speculating that these recent dolphin sightings are a positive sign that water quality is improving. On the contrary, some posit dolphins in the Bay are a sign of hungry predators chasing forage fish compressed by declining water quality.

Ultimately, we can never take the Bay for granted. If we don't fight for clean water through implementing the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, these experiences will only live on in stories and photographs for future generations. The wonders of this national treasure hold intrinsic value, leaving us with three little words to recite as our creed—Save the Bay!

P.S.- Our summer version of e-news just hit inboxes yesterday. Check out these state updates! Pennsylvania | Maryland | Eastern Shore of Maryland | Virginia | Hampton Roads

This Week in the Watershed: Dolphin Frenzy, Growing Grasses, and Blueprint Support

  • We love this editorial applauding the bipartisan support among the Maryland congressional delegation standing behind the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. (Capital Gazette—MD
  • A wastewater treatment plant in Hampton Roads, VA is planning to turn wastewater into drinking water. (The Virginian-Pilot—VA)
  • Underwater grasses, a crucial part of the Bay's ecosystem, are on the rebound after decades of decline. (Spinsheet)
  • CBF President William C. Baker writes on the need to support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint a midst attacks from Congress. (Baltimore Sun—MD) Bonus: CBF Statement
  • We are saddened by the news that Eleanor Merrill, a long-time supporter of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, passed away at the age of 82. (Washington Post—D.C.)
  • Archaeologists on the shores of the Wicomico River are studying how Native Americans consumed oysters. (Bay Net)
  • Warren, Lehigh, and Lancaster are the most recent counties in Pennsylvania to adopt a Clean Water Counts resolution, becoming the 28th, 29th, and 30th counties in Pennsylvania to ask state officials to make clean water a priority. (CBF Press Releases)
  • Dolphins have been sighted around rivers and tributaries of the Bay. (Capital Gazette—MD) Bonus: More dolphins!

What's Happening around the Watershed?

July 26

  • Annapolis, MD: Wondering how your favorite Bay critters are doing? Join CBF Fisheries Director Bill Goldsborough to learn the latest about what's happening underwater beneath your boat, kayak, or paddleboard! Our summer "Save the Bay" Breakfast features an ecology crash-course and updates on the health of three of the Chesapeake Bay's most iconic fishery species: oysters, striped bass, and blue crabs—plus a menhaden bonus! Come enjoy a delicious Boatyard breakfast and learn things you never knew about some of the Bay's most important—and tasty—inhabitants. Click here to register!

July 29, and August 5

  • Shady Side, MD: Break a sweat and help Save the Bay—join CBF in cleaning the "homes" of the next generation of Chesapeake Bay oysters! Help restore the Chesapeake's native oyster population by cleaning oyster shells. We'll be shaking off the dirt and debris on shells so baby oysters can successfully grow on them. This "shell shaking" event is a bit of a workout but a fun, hands-on experience. With lifting involved, it is not recommended for individuals with bad backs or other health concerns. A tour of our restoration center will follow the shell shaking. Click here to register!

July 30

  • Norfolk, VA: Come on out for the 19th Annual Paddle for the Bay! Paddlers with kayaks to paddle boarders and all others in between, join in this Mid-Atlantic Paddlers Association certified competition to raise funds for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Click here to register!

August 4

  • East Pennsboro, PA: Get out on the water with CBF! This canoe trip will start just north of the city of Harrisburg near Ft. Hunter Park. The educators from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Susquehanna Watershed Education Program will lead the way, winding through large islands. The trip will take the group under the historic Rockville Bridge and pass by one of the largest rookeries on the river, Wade Island. Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


Good News about Oysters

Oyster-planting-1200
3.2 million spat on shell were planted in the South River this July. Photo by Erika Nortemann.

Persuading microscopic oyster larvae to "set" on old shells is as simple as placing plenty of both into a large round tank of circulating Bay water and leaving them together for several days. Right?

Not hardly. This Chesapeake miracle is absolutely dependent on good water quality. Some years, successive sets die off, handcuffing restoration programs.

But not this year, at least so far. CBF's MD Oyster Restoration Center at Shady Side has been able to produce a record number of spat (i.e. baby oysters) on shell, the universal currency of restoration. "The spring and summer have been extremely kind to us," said Capt. Karl Willey as he deftly maneuvered Patricia Campbell, CBF's 60' oyster planter, around Thunder & Lightning, an oyster reef in the South River that is open to harvest by watermen wielding hand tongs. "The hatchery at the University of Maryland Horn Point Laboratory started producing larvae early—in April—and has continued. We've seen strong spat sets in our tanks since then. We've actually gotten ahead of schedule, with 31 million spat set on shell and placed on restoration reefs in the Little Choptank...Now we have July to work small projects with some of our partners. That's why you found Kate [South River Federation Executive Director Kate Fritz] and me counting spat on the dock this morning." 

Indeed, as Dan Johannes, Pat Beall, and intern Patrick McCabe loaded spat on shell into the large bins on either side of Patricia Campbell's long foredeck, Karl and Kate carefully examined a random sample of several dozen shells, counting the pinhead-sized spat on each. Eight-to-twenty spat on each shell allowed him and Kate to estimate how many spat the big boat would be planting on this day: 3.2 million. 

Loading and counting completed, the crew and several volunteers, including Kate's Board Chair, Kevin Green, climbed aboard for the one-hour run up to South River. We slowed briefly to watch a large pod of dolphins fishing in the river's mouth, then got down to work on a sanctuary reef 11-14' deep off Larrimore Point. As Kate and Kevin watched on the foredeck, Dan started up the hydraulic system that tilts the bins full of spat on shell inward to the conveyor belt that runs down the center of the foredeck. Pat and Patrick began to regulate the flow of 1.4 million spat on their shells into a steady stream on the belt, all moving forward to drop onto a rotating "planter wheel" at the bow that throws them out in a circle 10-12' in diameter. Meanwhile, a GPS antenna mounted beside the wheel sent a continuous signal of our track to the electronic display in front of Karl at the helm, recording the data on a memory card. This technology arms Karl with the data to know everywhere this program has planted since 2003.

We dropped another 0.5 million spat on shell on an 8' sanctuary reef tended by John Flood, an South River Federation Board member emeritus, and 0.3 million on another sanctuary off the mouth of Little Aberdeen Creek. Finally, we moved to Thunder & Lightning, to drop the last 1 million in 10-12' where local watermen partners would be able to harvest them once they grow out in two-to-three years.

Oyster-planting-1200-b
CBF's oyster planting boat, the Patricia Campbell. Photo by Erika Nortemann.

Tiny predators like mud crabs that live on the reefs eat spat, but survival from spawn to adult for these guys set in concentration in our tanks is higher than natural sets in the wild," Karl said. "The density at which we plant [5 million spat on shell per acre] produces dense clusters." 

At the end of the month, Patricia Campbell and her crew will partner with the Coastal Conservation Association/Maryland to set 72 concrete reef balls with spat and place them onto the MD DNR's Tilghman Island Artificial Reef, in 18-20' of water due west of the island. The reef balls themselves have a special story: they have all been built by high school students in masonry classes, expressly for this purpose.

After three decades of bad news about oysters, imagine being able to get ahead of schedule with good news. Here's hoping we can make it last...

—John Page Williams, CBF's Senior Naturalist


What We're Reading This Summer

PicMonkey CollageHurling ourselves into the Bay or a cool mountain stream as often as possible. Getting up early to watch the sunrise and cast off a few lines before work. Feasting on sweet blue crabs with friends and family. These are some of our favorite summertime activities. And right up there on this list is grabbing a good book and a patch of shade and digging into an extraordinary story. 

So for the second year in a row, we asked some avid readers across CBF what some of their favorite summertime books are. Here's what they had to say: 

Josh Young, Director of Research and Prospect Management: "The Lord's Oysters by Gilbert Byron. A classic, this novel explores the Chesapeake through the lens of watermen and their families in the early 20th Century. Byron really knows how to spin a good yarn; and he writes about areas in and around Chestertown that I first discovered as a college student on the Eastern Shore, so this particular read also carries some personal significance for me. A perfect way to get lost in a lazy summer afternoon!"

Kim Coble, Vice President, Environmental Protection and Restoration: "The book I just finished was awesome—a fiction by Donna Tartt called Goldfinch. It won the Pulitzer Prize, which is easy to understand . . . the writing is fabulous.  You learn a lot about each character and become involved with them from the very beginning. The story is both simple and complex and is centered around a painting of a goldfinch. I highly recommend this book if you want a get-away, well-written novel."

Paul Smail, Staff Litigation Attorney: "As the weather warms I am typically drawn to Swedish crime fiction or the hawks and badgers of Ted Hughes, but a friend recently introduced me to the work of Joan Didion. I've jumped into the deep end this summer with her 1970 novel, Play It as It Lays."

Ann Jurczyk, Virginia Outreach and Advocacy Manager: "Here's one I love (an oldie but a goodie for anyone who likes water)—Spartina by John Casey. You can almost smell the salt marsh and feel his boat rock underneath you."

Alan Girard, Eastern Shore Director: "It used to be that recommendations about what to read would come from my wife. Now that my teenage son has become one of the biggest bookworms I know, my reading list comes from him. New York Times-bestseller The Fault in Our Stars by John Green delivers a great message about life, death, and the world as a place that's bigger than ourselves. 'I think the universe is improbably biased toward consciousness,' says one of its characters. 'It rewards intelligence in part because the universe enjoys its elegance being observed. And who am I to tell the universe that it—or my observation of it—is temporary?' A provocative perspective on human nature and our common purpose. And what a thrill when such compelling ideas come through our children."

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

Special Note: A portion of the purchases made through the above dedicated Amazon links will go toward saving the Bay. So get out there and get reading!

 


This Week in the Watershed

MarkDignen_1200
A healthy future for the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams relies on the full implementation of the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, which faced a new obstacle from Congress this week. Photo by Mark Dignen.

It has often been said in some form since George Santayana first uttered the words in the early 20th century, that those who do not learn from the past are condemned to repeat it. Indeed, history is often cyclical, with one generation repeating the previous generation's blunders and mishaps. This was the case for decades in Bay cleanup efforts when main Bay states agreed to voluntary pollution reductions, but with no checkpoints or accountability, the well-regarded intentions were destined for failure.

The tide turned in December 2010 when the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint took shape. Under the Blueprint, the EPA oversees enforceable pollution limits on nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment. Each Bay state has their plans to meet those limits, with two-year incremental checkpoints, and crucially, consequences imposed for failure to meet pollution-reduction goals. Finally, efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams have teeth.

As with most efforts to change the status quo, the Blueprint has faced significant resistance. Within weeks of its release, the plan was attacked by special interests with enormous political influence, and by attorneys general from 21 states. After years of legal challenges and two resounding courtroom victories, the Blueprint has been affirmed as a tremendous example of cooperative federalism. And already, we have seen positive signs that the Blueprint is working. Underwater dead zones are smaller, oysters are rebounding, and Bay grasses are covering more bottom than they have in 35 years!

But no one said change is easy. Congress is the next challenge for the Blueprint, as an amendment was proposed this week on an appropriations bill that would cripple the EPA's ability to impose consequences on states failing to meet pollution-reduction goals. Essentially, the Blueprint would lose its teeth, condemning us to repeat the same cycle of voluntary agreements which time and again proved fruitless. Now is the time to double-down on the Blueprint, not abandon progress. We will continue fighting to defend the Blueprint with hopes and ambitions of leaving a legacy of clean water for our children and future generations. Click here to read CBF's letter to Congress in defense of the Blueprint!

This Week in the Watershed: Appropriations, Shrinking Dead Zones, and an Ancient Fish

  • An appropriations bill passed by the House of Representatives threatens the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. (Baltimore Sun—MD)
  • CBF's Brock Environmental Center in Virginia Beach, VA is raising the bar for sustainable architecture. (Virginia Business Magazine—VA)
  • Dead zones are shrinking, as recently release data reveals the second best dissolved oxygen levels in Maryland's portion of the Bay since 1985. (Star Democrat—MD)
  • We couldn't agree more with this editorial condemning efforts to impede Bay cleanup efforts. (The Virginian-Pilot—VA) Bonus: CBF Letter to Congress
  • Municipalities in Pennsylvania's Lancaster County are receiving grants for projects to reduce urban stormwater runoff. (Lancaster Intelligencer-Journal—PA)
  • The Atlantic sturgeon, the oldest and largest fish in the Chesapeake Bay, is threatened by extinction. (Somerset County Times—MD)
  • Susquehanna County in northeast Pennsylvania became the latest county to adopt a Clean Water Counts resolution, becoming the 27th county in Pennsylvania to ask state officials to make clean water a priority. (CBF Press Release)
  • The resurgence of underwater grasses is worth celebrating! (Baltimore Sun—MD)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

July 21

  • Baltimore, MD: Join CBF and partners at a town hall meeting on the newly modified Consent Decree (CD) to address Baltimore's failing sewage system. The public is invited to attend this free meeting and ask questions, and to learn about what is being proposed and how the City plans to meet obligations detailed in the Consent Decree. Click here to register!

July 22, 29, and August 5

  • Shady Side, MD: Break a sweat and help Save the Bay—join CBF in cleaning the "homes" of the next generation of Chesapeake Bay oysters! Help restore the Chesapeake's native oyster population by cleaning oyster shells. We'll be shaking off the dirt and debris on shells so baby oysters can successfully grow on them. This "shell shaking" event is a bit of a workout but a fun, hands-on experience. With lifting involved, it is not recommended for individuals with bad backs or other health concerns. A tour of our restoration center will follow the shell shaking. Click here to register!

July 22

  • Virginia Beach, VA: Join CBF for an early morning outdoors! We are looking for volunteers to help with a variety of property maintenance at the Brock Center and Pleasure House Point. We can use your help anytime from 7:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Activities will include cutting back phragmites around the site, removing Japanese sedge, and checking in on Libby's Garden and the rain gardens. If you are interested, please send us an email at rsvp@cbf.org or call 757-622-1964. Please share with us your name, home or cell number, and your email address so we can stay in touch in case of any changes. Also please let us know if you can come out for an hour or all three hours.

July 26

  • Annapolis, MD: Wondering how your favorite Bay critters are doing? Join CBF Fisheries Director Bill Goldsborough to learn the latest about what's happening underwater beneath your boat, kayak, or paddleboard! Our summer "Save the Bay" Breakfast features an ecology crash-course and updates on the health of three of the Chesapeake Bay's most iconic fishery species: oysters, striped bass, and blue crabs—plus a menhaden bonus! Come enjoy a delicious Boatyard breakfast and learn things you never knew about some of the Bay's most important—and tasty—inhabitants. Click here to register!

July 30

  • Norfolk, VA: Come on out for the 19th Annual Paddle for the Bay! Paddlers with kayaks to paddle boarders and all others in between, join in this Mid-Atlantic Paddlers Association certified competition to raise funds for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Click here to register!

August 4

  • East Pennsboro, PA: Get out on the water with CBF! This canoe trip will start just north of the city of Harrisburg near Ft. Hunter Park. The educators from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Susquehanna Watershed Education Program will lead the way, winding through large islands. The trip will take the group under the historic Rockville Bridge and pass by one of the largest rookeries on the river, Wade Island. Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


Another Outrageous Attack on Clean Water and the Champions Who Stood up to It

NewPhoto by Neil Ever Osborne/iLCP.

Just this week another outrageous attempt to undermine the historic Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint rose, this time in the halls of Congress. Here's what happened:

Representatives Bob Goodlatte (VA) and Glenn Thompson (PA) offered an amendment to the Interior and Environment Appropriations bill that would gut the federal-state effort to clean up our Bay and its rivers and streams.

The Interior and Environment Appropriations bill sets funding levels for many important things, including EPA's work to Save the Bay. Mr. Goodlatte's Amendment #57 would keep EPA from using any funds to take "backstop" actions against states failing to meet their pollution-reduction goals set under the Blueprint. These backstop actions are what give the Blueprint its "teeth,” the very things that set it apart from any previous federal-state Bay cleanup effort. Previous efforts all lacked meaningful consequences for failure to reduce pollution. The Blueprint holds polluters accountable. And this summer's improving water quality and abundance of underwater grasses are a testament to the fact that it's working!

CBF President Will Baker sent a letter to representatives from the Bay region, urging them to vote NO on Mr. Goodlatte's amendment and asking them to redouble their support for the watershed states, communities, and farmers who are on the front lines of this historic restoration effort.

Yet still, late yesterday, the House passed Mr. Goodlatte’s damaging Amendment #57 that undermines the Blueprint clean-up effort—in direct opposition to the will of Bay states and residents.

Although we're disappointed the amendment passed, there is a silver lining worth celebrating. In an unusual show of unity for Washington these days, the vote demonstrates that a bipartisan group of Bay legislators are standing strong in support of the Blueprint, a federal-state collaboration that is working!

CBF would like particularly to commend the efforts of Reps. Chris Van Hollen (MD) and Bobby Scott (VA), who led efforts to defeat this damaging amendment.

And here is a breakdown of the Bay delegation vote on the amendment:

FOR (in support of the bad amendment): Representatives Barletta, Brat, Collins, Costello, Dent, Goodlatte, Griffith, Hurt, Jenkins, Katko, Marino, McKinley, Meehan, Mooney, Perry, Pitts, Reed, Rothfus, Shuster, and Thompson.

AGAINST (in support of clean water): Representatives Beyer, Carney, Cartwright, Comstock, Connolly, Cummings, Delaney, Edwards, Forbes, Gibson, Hanna, Harris, Hoyer, Rigell, Ruppersberger, Sarbanes, Scott, Van Hollen, and Wittman.

We are incredibly grateful to those above who stood up for clean water, in opposition to this amendment. They truly are champions of our Bay and its rivers and streams. If you live in their districts, please take a moment now to thank them.

The Appropriations bill still has to be reconciled with the Senate's version before it heads towards the President's desk for signature. We will keep you posted about how you can help ensure this harmful amendment isn't included in the final bill. Until then, thanks for your continued support. These encouraging signs of collaboration simply would not be possible without you speaking up for the Bay, its critters, and our communities.

—Alix Murdoch, CBF's Federal Policy Director


The Chesapeake's Oldest and Largest

Atl-sturgeon_iStock
A fish with unparalleled historical significance, the Atlantic sturgeon is threatened with extinction on our watch. Photo courtesy of iStock.

There's an ancient fish in our Chesapeake Bay, and it's threatened with extinction on our watch.

That's right: A local fish—the Atlantic sturgeon—survived Ice Ages, just to become endangered millions of years later by poor water quality, destruction of its habitat, and overfishing.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries is proposing to designate "critical habitat" for Atlantic sturgeon. CBF will be weighing in on this critical designation—and we hope you will, too.

The Atlantic sturgeon has a long history in the Chesapeake Bay, earning the title of its oldest and largest fish species. These prehistoric fish have been around for 120 million years, and each one can live 60 years, grow to 14 feet in length, and weigh up to 800 pounds.

But their numbers have dwindled, and, in 2012, the Atlantic sturgeon was added to the Endangered Species List. Now, NOAA Fisheries must identify those areas that are most important for the survival of the species—the "critical habitat" needed for spawning, rearing, feeding, and migration to other important habitat.

The link between the health of sturgeon and the health of the Bay and its major rivers is an important one. The Bay's degraded water quality has created barriers between important habitats, interrupting the species' life cycle. By restoring water quality through the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, we will be helping to recover one of the region's oldest, most extraordinary fish species.

From Virginia's James, Pamunkey, and Mattaponi Rivers to Maryland's Potomac River to Pennsylvania's Lower Susquehanna to the Delmarva Peninsula's Marshyhope Creek and Nanticoke River, sturgeon have spawned and survived across the Chesapeake Bay region. They'll need these areas—along with the healthy water quality that will allow them to get to these areas safely—in order to survive.

What can you do to help? Public comment on the critical habitat designation will be taken until September 1. Stay tuned for updates on how you can weigh in to support our recommendations for designation. In the meantime, more information on the proposal and comments can be found here.

Wow. Modern-day dinosaurs right here in the Chesapeake Bay. Don't your kids and grandkids deserve that same sense of wonder?

Let's work together to ensure that a fish that has been here for millions of years will still be here, spawning and someday thriving, for generations to come. 

—Bill Goldsborough, CBF's Director of Fisheries


Photo of the Week: Summer Storm Over Horn Harbor

LighteningStrike

This is a 30-second exposure taken from our pier last Friday evening in Peary, Virginia, overlooking the Chesapeake Bay.

This storm rolled down the Mobjack Bay and took direct aim at Cape Charles. The lightning strike is directly over Cape Charles.

I travel weekly for work all over North America. Likewise, my family is very active, going in different directions all week long. Every Friday when we cross the bridges in West Point on our way to Mathews County, we simply relax and begin to enjoy the peace, quiet, and solitude of the Chesapeake Bay. I grew up on the Bay as a kid, and I'm so thankful that I can raise my children on that same Bay today almost 50 years later!

—Scott Phillips

Ensure that Scott and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

 


This Week in the Watershed

Crab-jay-fleming
Underwater grasses, which depend on clean water, are key to the survival of the blue crab. Photo by Jay Fleming.

Without a doubt, one of the most beloved critters in the Chesapeake Bay is the blue crab. A summer staple of dinner plates, the blue crab is not only ingrained in Bay cuisine, but also in the Bay's culture, history, and economy. Considering the importance of this cantankerous critter, it has always been troubling that its population is notoriously unpredictable. Many factors impact its population in a cycle that can often be boom or bust. In efforts to improve blue crab numbers, harvest restrictions are often considered as one of the most important steps to take. While harvest restrictions are vital, particularly on females, there might be an even more important factorclean water.

Pardon the nautical pun, but clean water is "the rising tide that lifts all boats." For blue crabs, underwater grasses are critical to their survival. Blue crabs are most vulnerable when they are shedding their shell, and underwater grasses provide the cover they need to survive. However, underwater grasses are few and far between when pollution, largely from excess nitrogen and phosphorus, blocks the sunlight that grasses need to grow. Clean water not only helps blue crabs, but all flora and fauna living in and on the Bay. Not to mention, humanity benefits from clean water as well, with expanded recreational opportunities, improved public health, and massive economic benefits.

The Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint is the key to moving clean water efforts forward in the Bay. And a clean Bay, full of healthy, swimming blue crabs, is a legacy worth leaving to future generations. To learn more about all things blue crabs, tune into the most recent CBF podcast!

This Week in the Watershed: Burgeoning Blue Crabs, A City Showdown, and An Island Predicament

  • Maryland Governor Larry Hogan focused attention on the sediment buildup behind the Conowingo Dam, calling for new ideas to address the pollution problem. (Baltimore Sun—MD)
  • A public hearing on the coal ash ponds at the Chesterfield Power Station drew a large contingent of speakers imploring state regulators to impose stricter environmental requirements on Dominion Virginia Power. (Richmond Times-Dispatch—VA)
  • Animal rights groups are calling attention to the unethical hunting of cownose rays in the Chesapeake Bay. (York Dispatch—PA)
  • Improved water quality and underwater grasses have helped produce more—and bigger—crabs this season. (Bay Journal)
  • The successful renovations at the Blue Plains wastewater treatment plant are a high note amidst a national crisis of failing infrastructure. (Center for Progressive Reform Blog)
  • Virginia's Tangier Island faces an uncertain future. (New York Times Magazine)
  • Lawrence County in western Pennsylvania became the latest county to adopt a Clean Water Counts resolution, becoming the 27th county in Pennsylvania to ask state officials to make clean water a priority. (New Castle News—PA) Bonus: CBF Press Release
  • The cities of Boston and Baltimore have seen vastly different outcomes of local water cleanup efforts. (Baltimore Brew—MD)
  • Pennsylvania farms might face new federal inspections in light of the state not being on track to meet its 2025 pollution-reduction targets. (Lancaster Intelligencer Journal—PA)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

July 15, 22, 29

  • Shady Side, MD: Break a sweat and help Save the Bay—join CBF in cleaning the "homes" of the next generation of Chesapeake Bay oysters! Help restore the Chesapeake's native oyster population by cleaning oyster shells. We'll be shaking off the dirt and debris on shells so baby oysters can successfully grow on them. This "shell shaking" event is a bit of a workout but a fun, hands-on experience. With lifting involved, it is not recommended for individuals with bad backs or other health concerns. A tour of our restoration center will follow the shell shaking. Click here to register!

July 22

  • Virginia Beach, VA: Join CBF for an early morning outdoors! We are looking for volunteers to help with a variety of property maintenance at the Brock Center and Pleasure House Point. We can use your help anytime from 7:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Activities will include cutting back phragmites around the site, removing Japanese sedge, and checking in on Libby's Garden and the rain gardens. If you are interested, please send us an email at rsvp@cbf.org or call 757-622-1964. Please share with us your name, home or cell number, and your email address so we can stay in touch in case of any changes. Also please let us know if you can come out for an hour or all three hours.

July 26

  • Annapolis, MD: Wondering how your favorite Bay critters are doing? Join CBF Fisheries Director Bill Goldsborough to learn the latest about what's happening underwater beneath your boat, kayak, or paddleboard! Our summer "Save the Bay" Breakfast features an ecology crash-course and updates on the health of three of the Chesapeake Bay's most iconic fishery species: oysters, striped bass, and blue crabs—plus a menhaden bonus! Come enjoy a delicious Boatyard breakfast and learn things you never knew about some of the Bay's most important—and tasty—inhabitants. Click here to register!

July 30

  • Norfolk, VA: Come on out for the 19th Annual Paddle for the Bay! Paddlers with kayaks to paddle boarders and all others in between, join in this Mid-Atlantic Paddlers Association certified competition to raise funds for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


Photo of the Week: "Love" at Cape Charles

FullSizeRender

This is of my family at the Chesapeake Bay at Cape Charles, Virginia. This has been our vacation spot for years. I have been going there for about 30 years, [since I was two-years-old]. I now am blessed to be able to share it with my husband, 10-year-old son, and 5-year-old daughter. We love the "at home" atmosphere of Cape Charles, the semi-private beach, natural abundance, and fishing opportunities.

—Brandie Gilbert

Ensure that Brandie, her family, and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

 


This Week in the Watershed

Schlyer-1200-fishing
Fishing is just one of many recreational opportunities afforded to us by clean water. Photo by Krista Schyler/iLCP.

From the long, hot, muggy days, to the out of office messages from colleagues on vacation, to the barbecues and lawn games, there's no doubt that summer is here. With the warm weather comes ample opportunity to get out on the water, enjoying the Bay and its rivers and streams. Indeed, the Chesapeake Bay region rivals anywhere in the country when it comes to outdoor activities and gorgeous landscapes.

To enjoy this national treasure, however, the water needs to be clean. Environmentally-friendly actions taken by individuals on a broad scale can make a huge difference. If only everyone could avoid the environmental pet peeves of CBF's Pennsylvania staff! Great work is also taking place in the streets of Baltimore, where inspiring community leaders are working to clean the streets of trash that eventually washes into the Inner Harbor and the Chesapeake Bay.

Ultimately, however, the best hope for clean water throughout the Bay and its rivers and streams, is the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. And if the Blueprint is fully implemented, it will provide an additional $1 billion a year in economic value from recreational activities throughout the Bay region. The fun we have on the water and the beauty we experience will continue to inspire us in our work to see the Blueprint implemented and #SaveTheBay.

This Week in the Watershed: A Historic Trail, Pet Peeves, and Trashy Streets

  • The Anacostia Watershed Society released a report that the Anacostia River is still extremely degraded. (Bay Journal)
  • Virginia students learned outside, embarking on a trip with CBF's education program. (Free Lance Star—VA)
  • Harry Campbell, CBF's Pennsylvania Executive Director, writes on the environmental pet peeves of CBF's Pennsylvania staff. (York Dispatch—PA)
  • CBF's Brock Environmental Center was nominated as a finalist for World Architecture News' Sustainable Buildings Award. (World Architecture News)
  • A couple recently completed a nine-month, 6,900-mile journey, including a trip up the Rappahannock River, viewing the beautiful Fones Cliffs. (WVTF—VA)
  • Check out this fun Q&A on all things Chesapeake Bay. (Washingtonian—D.C.)
  • Community efforts are in full swing to reduce the level of trash on the streets of Baltimore, which eventually washes into the Inner Harbor. (Bay Journal)
  • Two Maryland watermen received lifetime bans following a large poaching scheme of striped bass, also known as rockfish. (Baltimore Sun—MD)
  • The Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail is celebrating its 10th anniversary. (Bay Journal)
  • Cambria County in central Pennsylvania became the latest county to adopt a Clean Water Counts resolution, becoming the 26th county in Pennsylvania to ask state officials to make clean water a priority. (Tribune Democrat—PA) Bonus: CBF Press Release

What's Happening around the Watershed?

July 8, 15, 22, 29

  • Shady Side, MD: Break a sweat and help Save the Bay—join CBF in cleaning the "homes" of the next generation of Chesapeake Bay oysters! Help restore the Chesapeake's native oyster population by cleaning oyster shells. We'll be shaking off the dirt and debris on shells so baby oysters can successfully grow on them. This "shell shaking" event is a bit of a workout but a fun, hands-on experience. With lifting involved, it is not recommended for individuals with bad backs or other health concerns. A tour of our restoration center will follow the shell shaking. Click here to register!

July 26

  • Annapolis, MD: Wondering how your favorite Bay critters are doing? Join CBF Fisheries Director Bill Goldsborough to learn the latest about what's happening underwater beneath your boat, kayak, or paddleboard! Our summer "Save the Bay" Breakfast features an ecology crash-course and updates on the health of three of the Chesapeake Bay's most iconic fishery species: oysters, striped bass, and blue crabs—plus a menhaden bonus! Come enjoy a delicious Boatyard breakfast and learn things you never knew about some of the Bay's most important—and tasty—inhabitants. Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate