Photo of the Week: A Place of Solace

ImageLone heron enjoys sunrise over the Chesapeake at North Beach, Maryland.

The Chesapeake, for me, is a place of solace to find quiet from the hustle and bustle of life in the D.C.-Baltimore region. I only wish there were more public access points along the Bay.

—Bob Garrigus

Ensure that Bob and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

 


Farmer Spotlight: Whitmore Farm

Picture 1The opportunity to purchase a farm gave Maryland native Will Morrow a final push into a mid-life career change. From a residential landscape design firm in D.C. to the hills of Frederick County, Morrow credits his interest in eating well in the city to spurring him into organic- and pasture-based farming. 

Despite the weeds and abandoned structures, Morrow invested in a 30-acre farm property in the Valley and dedicated himself to restoring the land to its previous splendor. Upon purchasing the land in 2003, Morrow established Whitmore Farm as a way of honoring the successful pioneer years of Benjamin Whitmore and his family. The property, which lies within the Monocacy Watershed, is bordered by Toms Creek and now serves as a Certified Organic Production.

Morrow notes that a large part of the farm's success—both environmentally and economically—is approaching the business with a consumer perspective: "We were the people shopping at farmers' markets in the city. We were the people seeking out and eating at restaurants that sourced locally. So, as a producer, I was familiar with the venues I wanted to sell at. I was also comfortable navigating the tight urban landscape for deliveries. And, I knew my buyer well. I was selling to myself."

Picture 2Morrow works to emphasize sustainable agricultural practices while he raises acres of crops and livestock. The farm specializes in both Heritage and American breed pasture-raised livestock for lamb, pork, and poultry for eggs. Morrow's philosophy toward animals is not only evident in the pasture-raised system but through his Livestock Guardian Dogs, a team made up of five rescued Great Pyrenees and a central Asian Shepherd.

In addition to his pastoral operations, Morrow is always looking for new ways to improve the sustainable production of the farm. He remains steadfast in his philosophy that ". . . part of our farm's mission is to use sustainable ag practices that respect the land and provide healthy food to our customers."

Picture 3The small but mighty farm raises grass-fed and finished lamb, pastured pork, and pastured eggs. In addition to the livestock and poultry productions, Whitmore Farm is also home to a sustainable and certified organic produce operation. Morrow grows an assortment of tomatoes, peas, arugula, beets, carrots, and flavorful figs to distribute to restaurants and sell at farmers' markets.

What's more, Morrow is a huge advocate for clean water. During an interview with the Baltimore Sun in November, he stated that the American Farm Bureau Federation was "on the wrong side of history" when it and its allies petitioned the Supreme Court to review their challenge to Chesapeake clean-up efforts.

Picture 4"As I get older, I tend to focus more on the long view," says Morrow. "Society, culture, and values are not static. They evolve over time . . . people farming today farm differently than their parents did and different still from the way their grandparents did. To think that we have reached the apogee in farming and that our current agricultural system is beyond reproach is naive and arrogant. The Farm Bureau is ignoring the science and values that most of the farmers I know hold dear. The status quo is not acceptable. The sooner they accept that, the sooner we can focus on the solutions."

A staunch believer in the power of education, Morrow has hosted numerous field days and informative trips for teachers as well as served as president of the Future Harvest Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture (CASA) Board. "Education is key for the next generation of farmers," he says. Appropriately, CASA's mission is to provide education, networking, and advocacy to help build a sustainable Chesapeake foodshed—something Morrow does every day on his farm in Frederick County.

—Text by Kellie Rogers; Photos courtesy of Will Morrow

Learn more about how farmers across the watershed are working to improve both water quality and farm productivity in our Farmers' Success Stories series.

 


Photo of the Week: A Reason to Get Up Early

Seneca Creek sunrise

Seneca Creek sunrise. A reason to get up early!

For me the Chesapeake represents a sanctuary from the rest of the world. A truly wild place, the Bay gives us so much. It's a place to get away from all the insanity. Fresh wild fish, crabs, oysters, and clams . . . screeching seagulls chasing schools of rockfish, and gorging themselves on the ripped up chunks of alewife and menhaden.

The Chesapeake's health depends on us—the Bay will only give as much as we give. And if we take more than we give, she will let us know. The Bay is much like our own body and it responds to how we treat it. 

—Charles Allen Gardner 

Ensure that Charles and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

 


What's Your Poo IQ?

CBF_FacebookAd01-PoopQuiz-560x292Think about it: There are hundreds of millions of people, livestock, pets, and wild animals that live in the Chesapeake Bay region. Every single one of us eats and that means every single one of us . . . well you know.

But do you know the impact of all that poop on our rivers, streams, and Bay? Take the quiz and find out!

You'll learn, for instance, how many of Virginia's rivers and streams are poop contaminated; how long it would take Pennsylvania inspectors to inspect all their farms; and how many tons of excess doo Maryland's chickens produce each year (Hint: It's a pretty insane number).  

Of course, in the wise words of children's author Taro Gomi: "Everyone poops." We can't avoid that necessary part of life, but we can make sure our water quality doesn't go down the toliet. So sit down, grab your #2 pencil, and take the Poo IQ Quiz!


Student Leaders Take Their Clean Water Message to the Hill!

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Members of CBF's PA Student Leadership Program met with U.S. Senator Robert P. Casey Jr., of Pennsylvania at his office in Washington, D.C. in December. Pictured above are (from left to right): Allison Markel, Anna Pauletta, Senator Casey, Mallory Taramelle-Dickinson, Abby Hebenton, and Maria Seitz.

Five members of our new Student Leadership Program in Pennsylvania spoke with U.S. Senator Robert P. Casey Jr., of Pennsylvania last month, about the importance of clean water in the Commonwealth. 

"The general message I wanted to leave with the senator was that people really do care about clean water and agriculture in Pennsylvania, and we so badly want to see positive change," Fairfield High School student Abby Hebenton said. "What we do in Pennsylvania affects everyone downstream, not just Pennsylvanians. We are so behind compared to other states, things are really going to have to change as far as laws and regulations go, in order to change how citizens think and act in regards to water and environmental conservation."

"We chatted with Claire Borzner, Senator Casey's legislative correspondent, who was very friendly and interested in listening to our thoughts on the senator's work, and answered any questions we had," Hebenton added. "Surprisingly, few people actually reach out to the senator with issues they think should be addressed, although Ms. Borzner informed us that she and her colleagues read every letter or e-mail that go through their office." 

"We wanted to make the senator aware of the struggles and successes of the Chesapeake Bay," said Allison Markel of Cedar Cliff High School. "In D.C., we were able to serve as passionate witnesses for the Bay's significance in Pennsylvania."

The Student Leadership Program is open to all high school students and is designed to give them a voice and an active role in the fight for clean water in Pennsylvania. The Student Leadership Council will meet throughout the year through video-conferencing and will plan and coordinate advocacy and restoration activities throughout the Bay watershed in Pennsylvania.

"I thought that it would be a really amazing opportunity to meet with someone in authority who has the power to make positive changes regarding something I am very passionate about," Hebenton said. "I was just looking forward to getting to see the political side of environmental issues and hopefully networking with some important people who have the power to make change."

Cumberland Valley High School student Maria Seitz added: "I always really value the chance to meet and speak with Senator Casey because I know it's not something that a lot of people get to do . . . just by being there we were letting him know that young people from Pennsylvania are concerned about the water quality problems Pennsylvania is facing."

Other parts of the visit made lasting impressions on the students, including speaking with CBF's Federal Policy Director Alix Murdoch and touring the Capitol. "I will never forget the experience of sitting in on the Senate," Seitz said. "That was really cool! A great experience that I wish more people could have."

Cumberland Valley High School students Anna Pauletta and Mallory Taramelle-Dickinson also made the trip to Washington, D.C. to visit with Senator Casey.

"As a student team, we are working toward a healthier Bay and to ensure a better future for our loved ones," Markel added. "I hope the senator was moved by our desire to stand up for something bigger than ourselves." 

— B.J. Small, CBF's Pennsylvania Media and Communications Coordinator

Interested in learning more about CBF's Student Leadership Program in Pennsylvania? Contact program coordinator Lane Whigham at lwhigham@cbf.org.

 


Top 10 Facebook Posts of 2015

While The New York Times had its "Year in Pictures" and Gizmodo had its "6 Greatest YouTube Reviews of Quiznos Sandwiches of 2015," we decided to compile our own "year in review list" in honor of fast-fading 2015. And what better place to start than our Facebook page—your favorite virtual spot for oohing and ahhing (and maybe the occasional bickering). From manatee sightings to attacks on clean water restoration to polar plunges to rebounding blue crabs to . . . Kevin Bacon (?!), it's been quite a year for CBF on Facebook. So without further ado, we give you our Top 10 Facebook Posts of the Year!

  1. Reaching more than a million people (not to mention momentarily shutting down our website), this Facebook post, which describes Maryland Governor Hogan's attack on Chesapeake restoration, was by far our most popular of the year.

  2. This is a sad day in the long fight to make Maryland waters clean enough for swimming and fishing. Governor Hogan's...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Thursday, January 22, 2015


  3. Forget Star Wars—oysters are far more interesting than Han Solo! Our favorite bivalve had a leading role in this Facebook video, our second most popular Facebook post of 2015, reaching close to 400,000 people and watched more than 130,000 times. Wow. 

  4. You have to see it to believe it. One adult oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of murky, polluted water a day. Think of...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Thursday, April 23, 2015


  5. This inspiring shot of a humpback whale showing off near the Cape Henry entrance of the Bay came in at number three, reaching almost 350,000 admirers.



  6. More humpback whales and the very same photographer Brian Lockwood captured spot number four, reaching more than 300,000 people.

  7. Congratulations to Brian Lockwood, our Viewers' Choice winner in this year's Save the Bay Photo Contest! His image of a...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Thursday, May 7, 2015


  8. Manatees in the Bay?! Yes, it can happen! And when it does, Facebookers can't seem to get enough. This curious fellow, who popped up in July near the Potomac River, inspired 5,339 likes and 2,010 shares, reaching more than 300,000 people and earning our fifth most popular post of the year.

  9. Is that you Chessie?!

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Wednesday, July 15, 2015


  10. Who said old news is no news? This 2013 story of an ancient ocean discovered underneath the Bay grabbed our sixth spot, reaching more than 200,000 Facebookers.



  11. "A picture is worth a thousand words," and don't we know it in this photo album featuring startlingly clear, beautiful Bay waters from CBF photographer and educator Bill Portlock. These stunning photos captured a vision of what the Bay and its rivers could be permanently if we are to achieve the pollution reductions necessary for healthy, sustainable waters across the region. Learn more about the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint here.

  12. "At times, it's been the clearest some folks like [Tangier Island] Mayor James “Ooker” Eskridge can remember in years."...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Monday, November 30, 2015


  13. It was a gorgeous, 40-degree December day just perfect for a swim. And that's exactly what a few committed (or maybe crazy) CBFers did to say thank you to those who helped us not only meet but far exceed our #GivingTuesday goal! Our polar plunge video came in at our eighth most popular Facebook post, reaching more than 150,000 people and watched nearly 23,000 times.

  14. AND WE DID IT! Many thanks to all of YOU who helped us meet and far exceed our #GivingTuesday goal! This polar plunge is for you!

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Friday, December 4, 2015


  15. In August, many of you learned about all the things you and Kevin Bacon have in common (namely a shared love of the Bay and its rivers). This video post, which describes said love, came in at our ninth most popular Facebook post of the yearWe know you're just itching to have less than six degrees between you and Kev, so watch it now:

  16. Michael Bacon and Kevin Bacon, of The Bacon Brothers, believe water connects us all, including the 17 million people...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Tuesday, August 4, 2015


  17. It's been a tough year all around the world, but this Daily Press article about the Bay's rebounding blue crab population gives us hope. Take a look and feel good and light going into the New Year. 

For those of you who made it all the way through our Top 10, congratulations! And make sure to follow us on Facebook (if you aren’t already) for the latest and greatest in 2016 . . .

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

 


Photo of the Week: Smith Island Sunset

104_7807I took these photos in late fall from the shores of Tylerton on Smith Island, Maryland. I was on Tylerton as a part of a conservation field trip my school does every year, I had happened to look at the water and snap this photo before the sun had set.

The Chesapeake Bay has always been close to my heart. Being from Delaware, the Bay was always around. When I went swimming or crabbing, it was always at the Bay. I've learned so much from the Bay, and I know there is more to learn . . . from the wildlife, to the Bay itself, to the people who make a life on the Chesapeake.

—Evelyn Sexton

Ensure that Evelyn and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

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Photo of the Week: Sandy Point Sunrise

Sandy Point 131Winter sunrise from Sandy Point. I was born in Chestertown, Maryland, and spent many years sailing and fishing in the Bay. I've appreciated the beauty of its scenery and its many opportunities for recreation, but now I'm trying to record some of those memories for others to share.

—Hugh Vandervoort

Ensure that Hugh and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Joseph's Clean Water Story


19052267_25244661_thebayThe Bay has played a huge part in my life. I've been fishing since I was two years old. The first time being back in 1998 on the Choptank River with my dad.

My life has revolved around the pursuit of fish. Living in Maryland has given me opportunities to do so. But, over the years the lack of clean water, fish, and forage has affected the fishing tremendously. I've had to pursue fish in other states like New York, New Jersey, and even down south to South Carolina.

The fishing has declined, and I'm beginning to see less fish every day. Growing up I used to see schools of bunker being blitzed on by stripers. It was hard not to see a school of baitfish roaming around. But now its all but ghost waters. These bunker schools don't appear—if you're lucky you can see a few swim by. If you're lucky.

Being a U.S. Marine, I learned the value of pride in oneself. I take that pride into where I live and fish. I love Maryland, and I'd love to fish here, too. But without the proper care and pride taken into caring for the Bay's health, I've had to pursue fishing elsewhere. I'd love to see more fish and more life within the Bay. And we can help. Whether its by picking up trash, recycling oyster shells, planting underwater grasses, or releasing a large cow striper in the spring to spawn—it's these small things we can do to help.

I want to see a Bay that we can not only fish, but can swim in as well. I hate hearing people bad mouth the health of the Bay, instead we should hear more people telling each other about how they helped the Bay and how it played a role in their lives. The Bay provided me with fishing and an opportunity to relax and have fun. But with its health depleted we need to help give back to the Bay that has given so much to us.

—Joseph Anonuevo
Ellicott City, Maryland 

What does the Bay and its rivers and streams mean to you? Share your clean water story here!


Happy Holidays!


2015HolidayE-CardHeader

The dawning of the New Year is a time to focus on our goals with renewed energy and resolve. At the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, we look toward 2016 as a time to work even more vigilantly for healthy rivers, clean streams, and a restored Chesapeake Bay.

Since 1967, CBF has been the leader in environmental education, advocacy, litigation, and restoration in the Chesapeake Bay region. More than 200,000 members strong, CBF is the nation's largest independent conservation organization working on behalf of the health and productivity of our national treasure—the Chesapeake Bay—and its rivers and streams.  

We never could have come so far or accomplished so much over the years without your dedication, passion, and generosity. Thank you for all that you do to support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint and to Save the Bay—we look forward to continuing our work with you in the New Year.

—Chesapeake Bay Foundation

We know that you share our love of the Bay and its rivers and streams and thought you might enjoy our photo album on Facebook. Though it may not feel much like winter yet, the album features beautiful wintertime scenes, like the one above, from across our watershed. Click here to visit our Facebook page to see our photo album.