Photo of the Week: Big Bird and Toadfish

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I took this photo of "Big Bird," as my mother would call the great blue herons that always visit her waterfront on the Poquoson River.  This one speared an oyster toadfish.

—Jon Smith

Ensure that Jon and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


What's Bill Seeing in the Field: Slick Cam

For more than 30 years, CBF Educator and photographer Bill Portlock has been exploring, documenting, and teaching the wonders of the Chesapeake and its rivers and streams. With his vast, intimate knowledge and experience with the watershed, we thought who better to check in with about what he's seeing in the field right now . . .

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Waterman David Melville harvests clams on "slick cam" (slick calm) waters near Gwynn's Island the day after Thanksgiving.

The waterman works aboard his well-maintained deadrise Third Son, using patent tongs to harvest clams. The hydraulic tongs are operated with foot pedals, one to open and close the tongs, the other to raise and lower them. The patent tongs are lowered to the Bay floor where they extract a clump of Bay bottom, with clams included. The hard clams or quahogs (also known as little necks, cherrystones, or chowders based on their size) can live 40 years or more if they escape predation.

In 1758, Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist Carl Linnaeus, who formalized the modern system of naming organisms called binomial nomenclature, gave the quahog its scientific name Mercenaria mercenaria because beads of quahog shell, fashioned by Native Americans, were used for currency in 17th century New England. "Mercenaria," is derived from the Latin word for wage.

—Photographs and Text by Bill Portlock, CBF Senior Educator

What else is Bill seeing in the field these days? Click here to see.

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Photo of the Week: Gone for Winter

Image1Taken just the other week during the Thanksgiving holiday.

A Thanksgiving postcard from the middle of the Bay.

The blessing of mild weather and a calm Bay gave us an opportunity to make one last run for the season in Nana's skiff before Thanksgiving dinner.

Seen here, an osprey nest on the Uppards area of Tangier Island sits vacant, a sure sign that winter can't be too far off. We look forward to seeing these beautiful birds again next year.

—Suzanne M. Pruitt 

Ensure that Suzanne and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Photo of the Week: One Last Cruise

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I had a beautiful fall season on the Bay . . . out a few times a week in the upper Chesapeake, but with colder temps moving in, it was time for one last cruise.

Spent all day Friday [Nov. 18] out on the water in my 1968 Trojan Seaskiff, fishing until sunset. Was beautiful. 

Hauled MoNaH out at noon the next day just before the winter winds came in.

—Michael Redmond

Ensure that Michael and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Happy Thanksgiving!

At this special time of year, we're reminded of how grateful we are for all of you and your support of the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint.

This year alone, you helped plant more than 46 million water-filtering oysters on reefs and 17,000 trees across the region. And you helped give 40,000 students and teachers unforgettable experiences on our rivers, streams, and Bay so that they will learn to love and protect these waters like we do. 

All of these things were only made possible through your commitment to clean water. So we're sending you a special thank you directly from CBF President Will Baker on this golden November day at the Merrill Center.

Thank you again for all that you do to Save the Bay. We never could have come so far or accomplished so much over the years without your dedication, passion, and generosity. 

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at CBF!

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

 


Bill's Tried-and-True Thanksgiving Recipe

OysterStuffing_600x386For 27 years, my family and neighbors have spent Thanksgiving on the banks of Stove Point, overlooking Fishing Bay and the mouth of the Piankatank River in Virginia. From there, we eat raw oysters, drink Bloody Marys, and glance out over the Bay's gray, November waters.   

To me, there's no better place or time of year to experience the Chesapeake. 

I'm grateful for that day, that place, that moment with family and friends. And I'm thankful for you, too. As CBF supporters, your generosity and friendship make everything we do possible. Because of you, in this year alone, we planted more than 46 million native oysters on reefs and 17,000 trees across the watershed. We gave 40,000 students and teachers unforgettable experiences on our rivers, streams, and Bay so that they will learn to love and protect these waters like we do.

All of these things were only made possible through your commitment to clean water.  

And as a small token of our gratitude, please enjoy Director of Fisheries Bill Goldsborough's favorite oyster stuffing recipe just in time for the holidays. It's the perfect addition to a hearty meal on a cold winter's day.

What's more, it's the perfect way to celebrate Bill's last month with CBF. After 38 years of tirelessly fighting for the Bay's rockfish, oysters, and crabs, Bill will be retiring in December. And we are so incredibly grateful for and proud of his extraordinary efforts to restore this Bay we all love.  

Click here to celebrate Bill and get his tried-and-true oyster stuffing recipe. 

We've accomplished so much over the years thanks to your dedication, passion, and generosity. Thank you again for all that you do to Save the Bay.

Happy Thanksgiving!

 —Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

 


Photo of the Week: The Supermoon and the Mighty Potomac

DSC_2767CBF The Supermoon of November 13 2016
"The moon does not fight. It attacks no one. It does not worry. It does not try to crush others. It keeps to its course; but by its very nature, it gently influences. What other body could pull an entire ocean from shore to shore? The moon is faithful to its nature and its power is never diminished." —Ming-Dao Deng

 

As the supermoon (AKA the beaver moon) rises over ridgelines of Blockhouse Point Conservation Park and Sharpshin Island under fall skies, the mighty Potomac becomes vividly reflective of its serene beauty and deeply solemn among paddlers who enjoy this magical and wondrous waterway through all the seasons.

—Dom J. (DJ) Manalo

Ensure that DJ and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Photo of the Week: Tangier Crab Shacks

Crab Shacks
This photo of Tangier's crab shacks was taken in mid September.

My husband and I are New Englanders and both grew up near working boatyards. My Dad was a commercial lobster fisherman. We moved to the Eastern Shore of Virginia two years ago. We have been to Tangier Island a couple times.

Seeing the watermen of Tangier brings back so many memories of my childhood. We love the gritty appearance of the island's crab shacks. The hard work and the love of the Bay is evident as you walk through the community. Life must be difficult for these islanders, but they will stay there as long as Mother Nature is kind.  

—Lisa Gurney, Onancock, Virginia 

Ensure that Lisa, her husband, and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Photo of the Week: Smith Island Morning

IMG_0665
I took this picture of Ewell, Smith Island on the morning of October 21, 2016.  I was participating in a CBF retreat for Maryland Teachers of the Year. CBF's Capt. Jessie Marsh was taking us out to check our crab traps.

I cannot speak highly enough about how passionately the CBF staff (Jessie, Norah, Kat, Adam, and David)  worked to inspire us to advocate for Maryland's most precious natural resource and energize the next generation of Chesapeake Bay stewards.

—Anne Highfield, Cecilton Elementary School Teacher 

Ensure that Anne, her students, and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights and places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay and its waters! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

Note about the photo: "I should also note that I took the photo with my iPhone and edited it with a few apps (Snapseed, Glaze, Mextures, and Image Blender.)"

 


This Week in the Watershed: All Hands on Deck

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A group helps haul aboard a trawl net as part of a survey of life in the James River. CBF is engaging diverse audiences to join us in the fight to save the Bay. Photo by Kenny Fletcher/CBF Staff..

As mentioned a couple of weeks ago, the Chesapeake Bay watershed is home to 17 million people. While the Bay and its rivers and streams face many threats from agricultural pollution to polluted runoff, perhaps the greatest challenge is engaging such a diverse, expansive group of people to rally around clean water efforts.

To borrow a sailing term, we need all hands on deck. While many groups can go overlooked, engaging people from all backgrounds is paramount. No single group or individual can save the Bay alone. But rather than a challenge, this is an exciting opportunity.

Now more than ever, CBF is focusing on engaging diverse audiences, including recently embarking on a field trip with members of Central Virginia's Hispanic community. Building connections like these empower different groups to not only appreciate the value of clean water but fight for it in their communities. These are the types of partnerships that are key building blocks to a saved Bay.

At the end of the day, everyone benefits from clean water. From improved public health to thriving economies, to extensive recreational opportunities, we all can get behind the mission to save the Bay. With the full implementation of the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint and continued outreach to all groups and audiences in the watershed, these benefits are within reach.

This Week in the Watershed: Diversifying, Gardening Oysters, and Learning Outside

  • Often overlooked by environmental groups, CBF is engaging the Hispanic community, most recently in Richmond. (Progress Index—VA)
  • After CBF gathered data throughout Maryland this summer on bacteria in local waterways, we were disappointed to learn the source testing for this bacteria yielded a majority of "unidentified" sources. (Frederick News Post—MD)
  • Two thumbs up to Pennsylvania high school student and President of CBF's Pennsylvania Student Leadership Council Anna Pauletta, who finished first in the nation at the 89th national Future Farmer of America's convention. (The Sentinel—PA) Bonus: CBF Statement
  • Residents and environmentalists are fighting against an expansive chicken house operation that was recently approved by Wicomico County on Maryland's Eastern Shore. (Daily Times—MD)
  • Taking students to learn outside is having a positive impact in the classroom. (Suffolk News Herald—VA)
  • Bravo to the dedicated volunteers who are working to clean Baltimore's Inner Harbor through oyster gardening. (Baltimore Sun—MD)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

November 5

  • Smithsburg, MD: Join CBF at this recently completed stream restoration project on Little Antietam Creek and help us with the final stages of restoring the stream banks and floodplain. Volunteers will install live stakes consisting of willow cuttings as well as native trees and shrubs.  Learn about stream restoration techniques used throughout the region by touring this recently completed project and lend your hand for the final touches. Click here to register!
  • Baltimore, MD: Waterfront Partnership and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation are teaming up again to host The Great Baltimore Oyster Festival! Enjoy live music by the High & Wides and Tongue in Cheek, oysters, other seafood options, alcohol, food trucks, family-friendly activities, and interactive Chesapeake Bay themed displays! Click here for more information!

November 6

  • Annapolis, MD: Join approximately 25,000 runners and walkers crossing the 4.35-mile Chesapeake Bay Bridge as part of the third annual Across the Bay 10k. The dual-span bridge doesn’t allow pedestrian traffic at any other time of the year, so this is a unique opportunity—and the view is amazing! CBF is an official charity partner of the Across the Bay 10K, and we are excited to offer Charity Bibs as part of that partnership. It's a win-win...you get a guaranteed entry into the race and help save the Bay with a donation to CBF! Get your charity bib now! Bibs have sold out!

November 12

  • Virginia Beach, VA: Volunteer with CBF at Calypso Bar & Grill! We will be celebrating our favorite bivalve, the oyster, with an oyster roast. Volunteers are needed to help recycle the oyster shells, pour beverages, and take tickets. A portion of the proceeds will help CBF in its work to save the Bay! To volunteer, please email or call Tanner Council at tcouncil@cbf.org or 757-622-1964.

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate