Greening Up Virginia's Eastern Shore Homes

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In the small bayside town of Harborton, Sue and Bill Mastyl's home stands as a reminder that green home features are not only good for the environment, but also good for your wallet. For example, when they installed a solar power system and new hot water heater in 2009 they got back a whopping 50 percent of the cost through a combination of federal and state tax credits. They also got tax credits when they installed a new geothermal heat pump a few years ago.

Running energy-efficient systems that rely mainly on solar power, the couple's electricity bill adds up to only about eight dollars in an average month. When you factor in the quarterly renewable energy credits they get, by the end of the year they sometimes even end up making money!

"People think that things like solar and geothermal can only be done when you build new, so I'm constantly trying to reinforce that they can be added very easily to any type of building, as long as you have the right location," says Sue Mastyl. "I also try to emphasize that low-hanging fruit like energy-efficient windows, weather stripping, insulation, energy-efficient appliances, turning down the thermostat, remembering to turn off the lights when you leave a room—all of this can have a huge impact."

Home improvement tax credits are available for all types of projects, from boosting insulation to adding high-efficiency heating and cooling equipment. It's worth checking out if a renovation qualifies next time you undertake projects around the house.

In addition to these credits, "energy-efficient mortgages" let homeowners borrow money for improvements. These loans can cover more pricey upgrades that otherwise might not be affordable, like installing double-pane windows or HVAC upgrades. Since heating and cooling accounts for more than half of the energy used in the average American home, these investments will help you stay comfortable and save money in the long run.

Janet and Haydon Rochester never thought their 1907 Onancock home would be the focus of so much local buzz when they started renovations a year ago. Their traditional Eastern Shore house is in the process of undergoing a complete renewal with an emphasis on energy-saving upgrades. 

While from the exterior the Rochester place looks like a traditional Eastern Shore house, numerous subtle upgrades have made the dwelling much more energy efficient. Many are simple improvements that have made a big difference in cutting down on heating and cooling costs. Windows are all double glazed and coated to reject heat, while the roof is a highly reflective material that keeps the house cooler during the summer. Beefed up insulation, along with aggressively sealing and caulking all cracks, has also made a big dent in energy loss. Low water toilets and shower heads add up to savings in the water bill. Interestingly, these renovations have actually enhanced the traditional character of an older home.

Of course, there are plenty of other benefits to undertaking energy-efficient upgrades. First and foremost, they lead to cleaner air and water for all of us. Using less energy at home often means burning less gas, coal, or oil. Burning those fossil fuels produces pollution that not only contaminates the air, but as a result of rain storms also ends up in local rivers, creeks, and the Chesapeake Bay. Cutting down on energy usage can mean a reduction of nitrogen oxides in our air, which are a significant source of nitrogen entering the Chesapeake. 

So by undertaking these upgrades you both help improve the environment and support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, the plan in place to clean up the Bay.

The greening of towns up and down the Shore now has a new meaning—people are increasingly integrating green-building design elements into their homes and recognizing their personal impact on our environment. 

—Tatum Ford, CBF's Virginia Eastern Shore Outreach Coordinator


Photo of the Week: My One and Only

Photo by Dennis Raulin.Photo by Dennis Raulin.

In honor of Saint Valentine and his official day a mere six days away, we started thinking—what's the most romantic creature in the Chesapeake region? Is it the seahorse that dances and twirls with its mate, intertwining tails and changing colors as they spin? The jellyfish that, in pure Shakespearean tragedy, promptly dies right after spawning?

We'd like to think it's the osprey. The osprey that mates for life and returns each year (often traveling thousands of miles) to nest in the same area where they were born and to be reunited with their one and only. As true with many relationships, ospreys develop a strong partnership as they build their "home" or nest together. As they continue to play house, females lay eggs, which they incubate for one to two months. The devoted parents stick together and feed and care for the nestlings for 40-55 days after hatching until they learn to fly. 

Very soon these osprey will begin their migration north for the spring and summer, many settling into nests in the Chesapeake Bay region—what's often called the "osprey garden" as it has the most concentrated population of osprey in the world. We can't wait to see these lovebirds again. 

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Farmer Spotlight: Whitmore Farm

Picture 1The opportunity to purchase a farm gave Maryland native Will Morrow a final push into a mid-life career change. From a residential landscape design firm in D.C. to the hills of Frederick County, Morrow credits his interest in eating well in the city to spurring him into organic- and pasture-based farming. 

Despite the weeds and abandoned structures, Morrow invested in a 30-acre farm property in the Valley and dedicated himself to restoring the land to its previous splendor. Upon purchasing the land in 2003, Morrow established Whitmore Farm as a way of honoring the successful pioneer years of Benjamin Whitmore and his family. The property, which lies within the Monocacy Watershed, is bordered by Toms Creek and now serves as a Certified Organic Production.

Morrow notes that a large part of the farm's success—both environmentally and economically—is approaching the business with a consumer perspective: "We were the people shopping at farmers' markets in the city. We were the people seeking out and eating at restaurants that sourced locally. So, as a producer, I was familiar with the venues I wanted to sell at. I was also comfortable navigating the tight urban landscape for deliveries. And, I knew my buyer well. I was selling to myself."

Picture 2Morrow works to emphasize sustainable agricultural practices while he raises acres of crops and livestock. The farm specializes in both Heritage and American breed pasture-raised livestock for lamb, pork, and poultry for eggs. Morrow's philosophy toward animals is not only evident in the pasture-raised system but through his Livestock Guardian Dogs, a team made up of five rescued Great Pyrenees and a central Asian Shepherd.

In addition to his pastoral operations, Morrow is always looking for new ways to improve the sustainable production of the farm. He remains steadfast in his philosophy that ". . . part of our farm's mission is to use sustainable ag practices that respect the land and provide healthy food to our customers."

Picture 3The small but mighty farm raises grass-fed and finished lamb, pastured pork, and pastured eggs. In addition to the livestock and poultry productions, Whitmore Farm is also home to a sustainable and certified organic produce operation. Morrow grows an assortment of tomatoes, peas, arugula, beets, carrots, and flavorful figs to distribute to restaurants and sell at farmers' markets.

What's more, Morrow is a huge advocate for clean water. During an interview with the Baltimore Sun in November, he stated that the American Farm Bureau Federation was "on the wrong side of history" when it and its allies petitioned the Supreme Court to review their challenge to Chesapeake clean-up efforts.

Picture 4"As I get older, I tend to focus more on the long view," says Morrow. "Society, culture, and values are not static. They evolve over time . . . people farming today farm differently than their parents did and different still from the way their grandparents did. To think that we have reached the apogee in farming and that our current agricultural system is beyond reproach is naive and arrogant. The Farm Bureau is ignoring the science and values that most of the farmers I know hold dear. The status quo is not acceptable. The sooner they accept that, the sooner we can focus on the solutions."

A staunch believer in the power of education, Morrow has hosted numerous field days and informative trips for teachers as well as served as president of the Future Harvest Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture (CASA) Board. "Education is key for the next generation of farmers," he says. Appropriately, CASA's mission is to provide education, networking, and advocacy to help build a sustainable Chesapeake foodshed—something Morrow does every day on his farm in Frederick County.

—Text by Kellie Rogers; Photos courtesy of Will Morrow

Learn more about how farmers across the watershed are working to improve both water quality and farm productivity in our Farmers' Success Stories series.

 


Water Quality Plays Key Role in Return, Survival of Bald Eagles

The following first appeared in the York Dispatch.

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A bald eagle snatching it's prey. Photo by Barbara Houston.

A new season of the Commonwealth's most popular, high-flying reality show is back online.

Millions are expected to log on to the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) website and watch as live-streaming cameras show the drama of nature at several bald eagle nests in the Keystone State. The experiences open windows onto nature like never before.

People went online more than one and a-half million times last year to see a pair of bald eagles raise two eaglets in a nest near Codorus State Park. They saw the entire process, from "nestorations" in January, laying of the eggs in February, hatching in March, and the eaglets leaving the nest in June, as it happened. This is the tenth year for the nest and the second that cameras and microphones are there.

Another popular nest is in a Hackberry tree in the town of Hays, along the Monongahela River, near Pittsburgh. The camera and sound are sponsored by the Western PA Audubon Society. This is the third season a camera has watched the nest that eagles first used in 2013. Sadly, neither of the two eggs in the Hays nest were viable last year. But the year before, three eaglets thrived and successfully left the nest.

Those who lognon to the live cameras realize quickly that waterways play a key role in the lives of bald eagles and nesting sites are never far from water. Streams, lakes, and rivers are key habitat for bald eagles. In the winter, they congregate in tall trees near open water, to spot prey and shelter at night.

Fish make up almost 90 percent of a bald eagle's diet. Is there a more majestic sight than an eagle soaring and scanning open water, swooping gracefully downward, and then with their talons, plucking prey through the water's surface?

The Codorus eagles feed fish from Lake Marburg, Codorus Creek, and other York County waterways to their young ones. Bass from the Monongahela is often on the menu at the Hays nest.

So it's no secret that the survival and recovery of bald eagles in Pennsylvania are dependent on clean water, and the availability of healthy fish and other aquatic life. It is yet another reason we must make progress in restoring the 19,000 miles of waterways in Pennsylvania that are polluted. About 350 miles of waterways in York County are impaired.

The runoff of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment is damaging our rivers and streams, and the Commonwealth is significantly behind in meeting its commitment to reduce polluted runoff.

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A screenshot of two bald eagles in their nest at Codorus State Park.

Also, consider findings of the latest multi-year study of the causes behind the deaths of young smallmouth bass, and lesions and spots on older smallmouths in the Susquehanna River. Some of those fish are served up in bald eagle nests throughout central Pennsylvania.

Endocrine-disrupting compounds and herbicides, and pathogens and parasites, are the two most-likely causes of diseased and dying fish in the Susquehanna. They are part of a perfect storm of compounds such as cosmetics, detergents, pharmaceuticals, and hormones in animal and human waste, that find their way into the diets of bald eagles and other wildlife.

On the bright side, the resurgence of bald eagles nationally and in Pennsylvania is an endangered species success story.

Habitat destruction, contaminated food sources, and illegal shooting took bald eagles to the brink of extinction. The road to recovery took major turns when the pesticide DDT was banned in 1972, and in 1978 when bald eagles were listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.

In 1980, there were only three known pairs of bald eagles nesting in Pennsylvania. Re-introduction began in the 1980's when the Game Commission brought 88 eaglets to the Commonwealth from Canada, raised them on specially constructed towers, and released them into the wild. Bald eagles were removed from the federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the lower 48 states in 2007.

By 2008 the number of nesting pairs in Pennsylvania had grown to 150. In 2013 there were nests in all but a handful of Keystone State counties and more than 270 nesting pairs.

Clean water counts in Pennsylvania. It is a legacy worth leaving future generations of humans and bald eagles.

Click here to access the Codorus cameras.

Click here to access the Hays camera.

—Harry Campbell, CBF Pennsylvania Executive Director

Bald eagles, other critters, and humans alike, depend on the health of the Susquehanna River. Take action now by asking Governor Wolf and the Department of Environmental Protection to add the Lower Susquehanna to the Impaired Waters List.


Photo of the Week: A Reason to Get Up Early

Seneca Creek sunrise

Seneca Creek sunrise. A reason to get up early!

For me the Chesapeake represents a sanctuary from the rest of the world. A truly wild place, the Bay gives us so much. It's a place to get away from all the insanity. Fresh wild fish, crabs, oysters, and clams . . . screeching seagulls chasing schools of rockfish, and gorging themselves on the ripped up chunks of alewife and menhaden.

The Chesapeake's health depends on us—the Bay will only give as much as we give. And if we take more than we give, she will let us know. The Bay is much like our own body and it responds to how we treat it. 

—Charles Allen Gardner 

Ensure that Charles and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

 


What's Your Poo IQ?

CBF_FacebookAd01-PoopQuiz-560x292Think about it: There are hundreds of millions of people, livestock, pets, and wild animals that live in the Chesapeake Bay region. Every single one of us eats and that means every single one of us . . . well you know.

But do you know the impact of all that poop on our rivers, streams, and Bay? Take the quiz and find out!

You'll learn, for instance, how many of Virginia's rivers and streams are poop contaminated; how long it would take Pennsylvania inspectors to inspect all their farms; and how many tons of excess doo Maryland's chickens produce each year (Hint: It's a pretty insane number).  

Of course, in the wise words of children's author Taro Gomi: "Everyone poops." We can't avoid that necessary part of life, but we can make sure our water quality doesn't go down the toliet. So sit down, grab your #2 pencil, and take the Poo IQ Quiz!


Clean Water Among the Many Visions for "Many Streams Farm" in Southern York County

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Bob and Maggie Cahalan on their southern York County farm. Photo by B.J. Small/CBF Staff.

Among the many dreams Bob and Maggie Cahalan have for their southern York County farm, protecting the water that runs through it is one of their most important.

With the help of CBF in Pennsylvania and restoration specialist Ashley Spotts, the Cahalans and their partners planted more than 300 native trees and shrubs on three acres, as buffers to trap and filter pollutants that would otherwise flow into Ebaugh and Shaw streams. The cool, babbling waters converge into Deer Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River, and eventually into the Chesapeake Bay.

CBF is emphasizing clean water efforts in York County through its "Clean Water Counts: York" program, which organizes and mobilizes residents to urge leaders in Harrisburg to show greater commitment to improving water quality, and focuses on the need to clean up York County's 350 miles of impaired creeks, streams, and rivers.

The Cahalans live in Greenbelt, Maryland, and with partners Eugenia Kalnay and Jorge Rivas, bought the 37-acre farm in Stewartstown, just north of the Mason-Dixon Line, in 2011. It is no longer a working farm, in that there currently are no crops or livestock to tend.

The forested and streamside buffers on Many Streams Farm are unique in the diversity of plants chosen. Various oaks and hickories, persimmon, paw paw, honey locust, and several types of berry-producing shrubs are among the 40 species.

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The Calahans inspect a tree on their farm with Ashley Spotts, CBF Pennsylvania Stream Buffer Specialist. Photo by B.J. Small/CBF Staff.

With guidance from CBF, Many Streams Farm benefited from the Commonwealth's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), which makes annual rental payments for land taken out of pasture or production and based on soil type.

"The CREP plan has everything they need to know, including tree and shrub numbers, maintenance requirements, contractor lists, tree lists, and reimbursement costs for the program," CBF's Ashley Spotts says.

"CREP had value beyond monetary value, because it had certain procedures that were developed and outlined," Bob Cahalan says. "We had to plant to a certain date and get 70 percent to survive."

The Cahalans intend to practice permaculture amid the farm's rolling hills, streams, and wetlands. They see permaculture as the harmonious integration of landscape and people, providing food, energy, shelter, and other material and non-material needs in a sustainable and ethical way.

"Experimenting with restorative and re-generative soil building agriculture that does not depend on annual plantings for food sources is a major goal," Maggie Cahalan says. "We hope to foster increased use of perennial and tree crops as food sources for humans and animals. We think it is especially appropriate for the sloped land of this piedmont hill farm."

The Cahalans would like to produce half of their personal food on Many Streams Farm. They have plans for spiral orchards of varieties of apples and cherries; a medicine wheel garden of ginger, berries, witch hazel and other medicinal plants; a farm museum; and a greenhouse. They are installing 30 solar panels to generate energy for farm needs and even have a project to harvest acorns and make bread.

They also see the property as a place for environmental education, a nursery for heirloom and edible native plants, and an opportune place for senior citizens to contribute and integrate.

The Cahalans' interest in clean water and the Chesapeake Bay extends beyond their York County Farm.

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Bob Calahan in a stream on his farm in southern York County. Photo by B.J. Small/CBF Staff.

They are very active in the non-profit CHEARS (CHesapeake Education, Arts, and Research Society), dedicated to the health of all who share the Chesapeake watershed environment. It is a vehicle for volunteer work to help the health of the Bay. The goal of the non-profit is to foster rural-urban linkages for the good of the Chesapeake watershed in urban, suburban, and rural areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia.

The Cahalans are also very much committed to Chestory (The Center for the Chesapeake Story), with roots in southern Maryland and the work of the late Tom Wisner. It is a group of artists, scientists, citizen activists, educators, poets, writers, and waterfolk who believe that art, song, and story can be the thread that binds people with the deep spiritual Chesapeake experience.

The Cahalans' passion for the Bay grew out of their reading CBF's State of the Bay report in 2005. "One of our first activities was to write an article for the little town we lived in, in Greenbelt," Maggie Cahalan says. "It was to summarize materials from the Foundation, and it galvanized us. I think the work of the Foundation in educating people is really important."

— B.J. Small, CBF's Pennsylvania Media and Communications Coordinator


Student Leaders Take Their Clean Water Message to the Hill!

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Members of CBF's PA Student Leadership Program met with U.S. Senator Robert P. Casey Jr., of Pennsylvania at his office in Washington, D.C. in December. Pictured above are (from left to right): Allison Markel, Anna Pauletta, Senator Casey, Mallory Taramelle-Dickinson, Abby Hebenton, and Maria Seitz.

Five members of our new Student Leadership Program in Pennsylvania spoke with U.S. Senator Robert P. Casey Jr., of Pennsylvania last month, about the importance of clean water in the Commonwealth. 

"The general message I wanted to leave with the senator was that people really do care about clean water and agriculture in Pennsylvania, and we so badly want to see positive change," Fairfield High School student Abby Hebenton said. "What we do in Pennsylvania affects everyone downstream, not just Pennsylvanians. We are so behind compared to other states, things are really going to have to change as far as laws and regulations go, in order to change how citizens think and act in regards to water and environmental conservation."

"We chatted with Claire Borzner, Senator Casey's legislative correspondent, who was very friendly and interested in listening to our thoughts on the senator's work, and answered any questions we had," Hebenton added. "Surprisingly, few people actually reach out to the senator with issues they think should be addressed, although Ms. Borzner informed us that she and her colleagues read every letter or e-mail that go through their office." 

"We wanted to make the senator aware of the struggles and successes of the Chesapeake Bay," said Allison Markel of Cedar Cliff High School. "In D.C., we were able to serve as passionate witnesses for the Bay's significance in Pennsylvania."

The Student Leadership Program is open to all high school students and is designed to give them a voice and an active role in the fight for clean water in Pennsylvania. The Student Leadership Council will meet throughout the year through video-conferencing and will plan and coordinate advocacy and restoration activities throughout the Bay watershed in Pennsylvania.

"I thought that it would be a really amazing opportunity to meet with someone in authority who has the power to make positive changes regarding something I am very passionate about," Hebenton said. "I was just looking forward to getting to see the political side of environmental issues and hopefully networking with some important people who have the power to make change."

Cumberland Valley High School student Maria Seitz added: "I always really value the chance to meet and speak with Senator Casey because I know it's not something that a lot of people get to do . . . just by being there we were letting him know that young people from Pennsylvania are concerned about the water quality problems Pennsylvania is facing."

Other parts of the visit made lasting impressions on the students, including speaking with CBF's Federal Policy Director Alix Murdoch and touring the Capitol. "I will never forget the experience of sitting in on the Senate," Seitz said. "That was really cool! A great experience that I wish more people could have."

Cumberland Valley High School students Anna Pauletta and Mallory Taramelle-Dickinson also made the trip to Washington, D.C. to visit with Senator Casey.

"As a student team, we are working toward a healthier Bay and to ensure a better future for our loved ones," Markel added. "I hope the senator was moved by our desire to stand up for something bigger than ourselves." 

— B.J. Small, CBF's Pennsylvania Media and Communications Coordinator

Interested in learning more about CBF's Student Leadership Program in Pennsylvania? Contact program coordinator Lane Whigham at lwhigham@cbf.org.

 


Top 10 Facebook Posts of 2015

While The New York Times had its "Year in Pictures" and Gizmodo had its "6 Greatest YouTube Reviews of Quiznos Sandwiches of 2015," we decided to compile our own "year in review list" in honor of fast-fading 2015. And what better place to start than our Facebook page—your favorite virtual spot for oohing and ahhing (and maybe the occasional bickering). From manatee sightings to attacks on clean water restoration to polar plunges to rebounding blue crabs to . . . Kevin Bacon (?!), it's been quite a year for CBF on Facebook. So without further ado, we give you our Top 10 Facebook Posts of the Year!

  1. Reaching more than a million people (not to mention momentarily shutting down our website), this Facebook post, which describes Maryland Governor Hogan's attack on Chesapeake restoration, was by far our most popular of the year.

  2. This is a sad day in the long fight to make Maryland waters clean enough for swimming and fishing. Governor Hogan's...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Thursday, January 22, 2015


  3. Forget Star Wars—oysters are far more interesting than Han Solo! Our favorite bivalve had a leading role in this Facebook video, our second most popular Facebook post of 2015, reaching close to 400,000 people and watched more than 130,000 times. Wow. 

  4. You have to see it to believe it. One adult oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of murky, polluted water a day. Think of...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Thursday, April 23, 2015


  5. This inspiring shot of a humpback whale showing off near the Cape Henry entrance of the Bay came in at number three, reaching almost 350,000 admirers.



  6. More humpback whales and the very same photographer Brian Lockwood captured spot number four, reaching more than 300,000 people.

  7. Congratulations to Brian Lockwood, our Viewers' Choice winner in this year's Save the Bay Photo Contest! His image of a...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Thursday, May 7, 2015


  8. Manatees in the Bay?! Yes, it can happen! And when it does, Facebookers can't seem to get enough. This curious fellow, who popped up in July near the Potomac River, inspired 5,339 likes and 2,010 shares, reaching more than 300,000 people and earning our fifth most popular post of the year.

  9. Is that you Chessie?!

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Wednesday, July 15, 2015


  10. Who said old news is no news? This 2013 story of an ancient ocean discovered underneath the Bay grabbed our sixth spot, reaching more than 200,000 Facebookers.



  11. "A picture is worth a thousand words," and don't we know it in this photo album featuring startlingly clear, beautiful Bay waters from CBF photographer and educator Bill Portlock. These stunning photos captured a vision of what the Bay and its rivers could be permanently if we are to achieve the pollution reductions necessary for healthy, sustainable waters across the region. Learn more about the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint here.

  12. "At times, it's been the clearest some folks like [Tangier Island] Mayor James “Ooker” Eskridge can remember in years."...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Monday, November 30, 2015


  13. It was a gorgeous, 40-degree December day just perfect for a swim. And that's exactly what a few committed (or maybe crazy) CBFers did to say thank you to those who helped us not only meet but far exceed our #GivingTuesday goal! Our polar plunge video came in at our eighth most popular Facebook post, reaching more than 150,000 people and watched nearly 23,000 times.

  14. AND WE DID IT! Many thanks to all of YOU who helped us meet and far exceed our #GivingTuesday goal! This polar plunge is for you!

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Friday, December 4, 2015


  15. In August, many of you learned about all the things you and Kevin Bacon have in common (namely a shared love of the Bay and its rivers). This video post, which describes said love, came in at our ninth most popular Facebook post of the yearWe know you're just itching to have less than six degrees between you and Kev, so watch it now:

  16. Michael Bacon and Kevin Bacon, of The Bacon Brothers, believe water connects us all, including the 17 million people...

    Posted by Chesapeake Bay Foundation on Tuesday, August 4, 2015


  17. It's been a tough year all around the world, but this Daily Press article about the Bay's rebounding blue crab population gives us hope. Take a look and feel good and light going into the New Year. 

For those of you who made it all the way through our Top 10, congratulations! And make sure to follow us on Facebook (if you aren’t already) for the latest and greatest in 2016 . . .

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

 


Photo of the Week: Smith Island Sunset

104_7807I took these photos in late fall from the shores of Tylerton on Smith Island, Maryland. I was on Tylerton as a part of a conservation field trip my school does every year, I had happened to look at the water and snap this photo before the sun had set.

The Chesapeake Bay has always been close to my heart. Being from Delaware, the Bay was always around. When I went swimming or crabbing, it was always at the Bay. I've learned so much from the Bay, and I know there is more to learn . . . from the wildlife, to the Bay itself, to the people who make a life on the Chesapeake.

—Evelyn Sexton

Ensure that Evelyn and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

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