Photo of the Week: Summer Sailing Memories

BoatHeron_9589_8.3Photo by Michael Redmond. 

Michael Redmond captured this stunning shot during a late summer sail on the North East River looking back at the sun setting over Carpenters Point. "[It] was a perfect evening to end three full days on the water," says Redmond. 

Ensure that Michael and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint! 

Do you have a favorite Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's E-Communications Manager, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

 

 


Paddling Toward a Saved Bay


Canoes on the WaterOn September 28 and October 19, CBF will hold two paddles through the marshes of Maryland's Kings Creek, a tributary of the mighty Choptank.
 With beautiful Eastern Shore scenery and autumn bird watching, these paddles offer an excellent opportunity to enjoy being out on the water during what is often thought of as the most beautiful season of the year.

These are also opportunities to learn more about our work, including defending and implementing the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, the science-based, multi-state plan to restore the Bay by 2025. The Blueprint incorporates the best science that we have available and provides a plan for each state within the six-state watershed to reduce the amount of pollution flowing into the Bay. But most importantly it provides a way for each person in the community to get involved with the effort to restore our shared national treasure.

There are many things that we can do as individuals to save the Bay. We can plant native plants in our gardens, participate in stream clean ups, and encourage our legislators to make Bay-friendly decisions. We can also continue to enjoy the incredible environment that surrounds us by joining us for a canoe paddle for instance! The Bay is a part of the heritage of the Eastern Shore, and if we connect with and experience it, we will be motivated to preserve it.

Bess Trout, CBF's Eastern Shore Grassroots Field Specialist 

Register for one (or both!) of these canoe trips now on our website here. 


Student Council Reps Save a Creek, Do a Little Dance

This article originally appeared the AnneArundelPatch earlier today.

DSC_0619Photo by Collin Kroh and Alyssa Morris.

Dirt is cold in March. The Harlem Shake is harder in a crab costume. A sycamore tree sapling is taller than a pin oak sapling. Those are just a few of the things you might have learned this past Saturday if you were Collin Kroh.

Kroh, a senior at Chesapeake High School, was one of about 20 student council representatives from several county schools who volunteered to plant trees at a farm in Gambrills. The effort was part of a growing collaboration between student councils around the state and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

"Most of my friends Saturday morning are still sleeping, but my friends here and I did all this," said Kroh with a wave of his hand.

"This" was nearly 1,000 trees planted along Towsers Branch Creek where it runs in a gully through the Maryland Sunrise Farm. Those trees will help buffer the creek—stop nutrients from cow manure from washing into the creek, and eventually to the Chesapeake Bay. A herd of black Angus cattle watched the crowd at work Saturday.

"It's like cleaning up my home," said Kroh, referring to the Chesapeake Bay.

And that's the type of realization the collaboration is meant to foster. Kroh lives on Bodkin Creek, a tidal creek in Pasadena. While his home is a 30-minute drive inland to Sunrise Farm, Kroh has realized that nutrients from inland sources make their way downstream and eventually to the Bay. Nutrients produce algae blooms which result in dead zones—low oxygen for aquatic life. And some types of nutrient pollution also carry bacteria which can make Bodkin Creek or any water body unsafe for swimming, or other recreation. So what happens on the land impacts the water which impacts each of us.

CBF and the Maryland Association of Student Councils (MASC) started working together formally this past year. MASC is a student-run organization composed of high school and middle school students from throughout the state. Many MASC members have taken CBF field education courses through their schools. Leaders in the group recognized many more students would benefit from the learning and service opportunities offered by CBF.  In turn, CBF recognized that a group of energetic, responsible youth could be great ambassadors for the Bay. The collaboration began.

Last year a core organizing group of MASC students took a trip to one of CBF's education centers on the Maryland Eastern Shore. Some also participated in a lobbying day at the Maryland General Assembly, learning how to advocate for strong Bay legislation. MASC chose CBF as its Charity of the Year for 2012.

Saturday's tree planting continued that collaboration, with the aim of providing a fun, hands-on learning experience, but also an opportunity to spread the news about Bay problems and solutions.

Sarah Lily, a senior at Chesapeake High School, said she had learned some things about the Bay in fifth grade at the Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center. But it wasn't until ninth grade that she learned more. Then last year, she attended the multi-day experience at the CBF education center in remote Dorchester County on the Shore, and learned by doing: investigating crabs, sea grass, menhaden and other aquatic life from the deck of a workboat, or canoe, or on a marsh "muck." The trip sparked two questions: How can I can keep learning about this stuff, and what more can we do? She e-mailed a CBF staff member who led the Dorchester trip, Jeff Rogge. A second trip was planned—to CBF's Clagett Farm in Upper Marlboro. And then the lobbying event.

Now Lily says the focus is getting more students involved. So she Tweets about tree plantings, and other happenings, and solicits blogs from students. Kroh attempted a time-lapse video of Saturday's planting to post on YouTube.

And together with other organizers they planned a Harlem Shake video shoot after all the planting was done Saturday, with all 20 students participating, complete with crab costumes and other props.

"The interest is there for fun," Lily says. "I think showing kids that helping out is fun is important."

Students came from Chesapeake High School, South River High School, and Arundel Middle School. In addition, about 20 employees of the Allegis Group, an equal number of "alternative spring break" students from the University of Maryland, and others also volunteered at Saturday's planting. The event was also part of a plan devised by CBF and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to make Sunrise Farm more environmentally friendly. The farm is the largest organic farm in the state. The farmer also raises cattle. It is the former Naval Dairy Farm.

—Tom Zolper
Maryland Communications Coordinator
Chesapeake Bay Foundation

Come out and join us at other tree plantings across Maryland!


A Legacy to Save the Bay

Danny Bowles.jpgIn life, Daniel "Danny" Bowles was a loving father, son, husband, brother, and loyal friend. Now, after his passing, those who love him are committed to ensuring his legacy lives on.

After he passed away in 2011 at the age of 37, Danny's family and friends created the Daniel Bowles Memorial Foundation to raise money in support of causes that he believed in. As an avid crabber, fisherman, and boater, Danny had a special place in his heart for the Chesapeake Bay.

Recently, on what would have been Danny's 39th birthday, his friends and wife, Genine, visited CBF's Merrill Center to make a donation to CBF in his memory. The donation represented the proceeds from the highly successful Daniel Bowles Memorial Bull Roast held last October, which was attended by 150 of his closest friends and family. This annual event is just one way Danny's family is keeping his memory alive.

Memorial donations like these are vital to CBF's continued success in our efforts to save the Bay. If you would like to learn more about how you can memorialize a loved one with a gift to CBF, visit our website or call us at 410/268-8816 (or 888/SAVEBAY).

—Brie Wilson


Grasses for the Masses: We're Looking for Volunteers!

4601757205_0016fb1591_bThis spring hundreds of volunteers will be wading out into the James and Potomac Rivers, planting underwater grasses, and helping to restore the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams!

These Grasses for the Masses volunteers first will have participated in a CBF workshop this winter before growing wild celery grass from seeds planted in water-filled plastic tubs in their homes, schools, or offices. Wild celery is not only fun and easy to grow, but it is also a vital part of the Bay's ecosystem, improving water quality, reducing erosion, and offering safe haven for native critters.

And it's not too late to join in the fun! Registration for our Grasses for the Masses program is now open. But hurry, spots are filling up quick for this hands-on and rewarding activity, and we'd love to have you join us!

—Emmy Nicklin 

Check out this Facebook photo album from underwater grass plantings of years past.

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What Are You Thankful For?

TikiThanksgivingIt's that time of year again: The time of sweet potatoes, turkey, and pecan pie!This week CBF staff celebrated with a potluck pre-Thanksgiving lunch yesterdayhighlights included oyster stuffing, lentil loaf, and every kind of pumpkin pie you could imagine.

Besides the glorious food, we were also thankful for the incredible efforts across the watershed that many of you have taken to clean up our Bay and its rivers and streams through the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. Never before have we come so close to restoring the waters we all love. Thank you. Now, let's finish the job!

Finally, as you get yourself in the mood for my personal favorite holiday of the year, check out this yummy butternut squash gratin recipe courtesy of chef Rita Calvert.

 

Butternut Squash Gratin With Local Goat Cheese and Pecans:
8 to 10 servings
Squash is often sold already peeled and seeded, making this recipe even easier.
-3 1/2 pounds butternut squash (about 2 medium), peeled, seeded, cut into 3/4- to 1-inch cubes (8 cups)
-2 tablespoons olive oil
-coarse kosher salt
-4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter, divided
-3 cups sliced leeks (white and pale green parts only)
-1 1/ teaspoons chopped fresh sage
-5-ounces soft fresh goat cheese ( about 2/3 cup)
-1 cup heavy whipping cream
-1 teaspoon curry powder
-1/2 cup pecans coarsely chopped

DessertTableMelt 3 tablespoons butter in heavy medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add sliced leeks and chopped sage; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Sauté until tender but not brown, about 15 minutes. Coat 11x7-inch baking dish with remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Spread half of leek mixture over bottom of prepared baking dish. Sprinkle with half of squash and half of cheese. Repeat layering with leeks, squash, and cheese. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Pour cream mixed with curry powder evenly over gratin. Sprinkle with chopped pecans. Bake uncovered until gratin is heated through and cream is bubbling, about 30 minutes (40 minutes if previously chilled).

TO GO: This gratin is a good choice for transporting because it travels well. Either complete the dish at home (wrap it tightly to keep warm) or wait until you get to your destination to add the cream and nuts and then bake.

Enjoy and Happy Thanksgiving!     —Emmy Nicklin

(Photos: CBF's Tiki Thanksgiving celebration. By Emmy Nicklin/CBF Staff.)


 

Red – Right – Recycling

RecyclingHalyards clanging, dealers dealing, and docks lined with the shoes of the shipboard can only mean one thing around Annapolis in October: The boat shows are in town.  

For the next two weeks, thousands of boaters, yachties, and brokers will live their lives on temporary docks in downtown Annapolis. Breakfasts will be eaten during the morning rush to boats and booths, lunches will be devoured between clients and tours, and libations will be consumed to celebrate sales and purchases. A good time will undoubtedly be had by all, but what will happen to those bagel wrappers and emptied bottles? 

Not to fear. This year Annapolis Green, partnering with WasteStrategies, is helping the United States Yacht Shows demonstrate its commitment to the environment by making recycling available (for the first time!) within the shows. As the biggest outdoor events in Annapolis, recycling at the boat shows not only sends a powerful message to the thousands of visitors who will attend, but will also demonstrate that locals care about the Bay and visitors should, too.

So if you’re in attendance, keep an eye out for the brightly colored "eco-stations" that will be set up around the show. Enjoy your time andif you’re luckyyour purchases, but be sure to keep it between the navigational beacons and remember, "Red-Right-Recycling!"

—Rob Beach


We're on Summer Vacation!

But don't worry...we'll be back real soon to tell more stories about the importance of our waters and the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—our best hope for a saved Bay. In the meantime, get out there and enjoy the water—whether it's your backyard river, stream, or Bay!

RiverGirl2A young girl enjoying her summer days on the Susquehanna, Sunbury, PA. Photo by © 2010 Miguel Angel de la Cueva/iLCP.


Photo of the Week: Saving the Bay One Lemonade Stand at a Time!

Brentwood band  Save the Chesapeake lemonade stand_rbAlexis King, sitting far left and holding the family chihuahua Rosie, her sister Elaina and cousin Danielle held a lemonade stand in support of Chesapeake Bay restoration efforts! Photo by Krista King.

A few weekends ago, sisters Alexis (age 12) and Elaina (age 10) decided to hold a lemonade stand with their cousin Danielle in order to support the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's clean water efforts! The stand and lemonade were provided by their local bank, Brentwood Bank. "We love the Bay and have chosen the Chesapeake Bay Foundation to receive the proceeds," said mom Krista King. Many, many thanks to these young girls for their incredible foresight, dedication, and help with Saving the Bay! 

Emmy Nicklin

Interested in raising money for CBF in creative ways? Become a BayRaiser! From races and other special events to family celebrations or remembering a loved one, you can use  BayRaiser to raise money for CBF's restoration work. Learn more.  

 


Why Drive When You Can Bike!

Bike3Photo by CBF Staff.

Tomorrow morning, thousands of workers across the country will hop on their bikes for Bike to Work Day! Now in its 56th year (can you believe it?!), this annual League of American Bicyclists’ event brings together all sorts of folks to celebrate a healthier, more sustainable way of life. To get you in the spirit for this national holiday, take a look at how last year’s event went down in Annapolis, and learn why biking is so much better for our waters and Bay. Also, check out our tips below for how to make this day a happy and safe one!  

Here are some tips for your riding experience:

  1. Ride like you drive (safely and cautiously…we hope!)
  2. Don’t worry about how fast you ride (remember the story of the Tortoise and the Hare?)
  3. You don’t have to dress or look like Lance Armstrong in order to participate…just have fun!
  4. Don’t forget your water, helmet…and a bike buddy!
  5. Last but not least, take the pledge! Become a Cyclist for the Bay and help us save a national treasure! 

—Emmy Nicklin

Learn more about Bike to Work Day and other cycling events in YOUR area!


Bike1
Photo by CBF Staff.