Innovative Independent School Environmental Leadership Conference

JPF_6173
Top administrators from independent schools across the Chesapeake watershed gathered together this summer at our Port Isobel Island Environmental Education Center near Tangier Island, Virginia, to collaborate, learn, and be inspired. They discussed the all-important question: How can independent school leaders most effectively support the integration of high-impact environmental education within their schools?

JPF_4755Forged by a partnership between CBF and The Gunston School, this cutting-edge conference provided a diverse group of independent school leaders the opportunity to strategize, investigate, and reflect on how to start their 2016-2017 school years putting their best "green" foot forward! 

The central themes of this conference included: ecological consciousness, hands-on field experience, environmental education theory and pedagogy, integration of sustainability into school missions and philosophies, visioning, leadership, change management, and action planning through the identification of key goals.  The importance of facilitating outdoor, inquiry-based field investigations for students became abundantly clear as the group discussed current environmental issues that will require solution-based "systems thinking" learning. These school leaders sailed away understanding the value of environmental-based learning and its ability to build in students the skills needed to understand complex issues, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information, and ultimately, make responsible, informed decisions as 21st century citizens. 

JPF_6111The conference offered new ideas for effectively implementing environmental literacy objectives into curriculum, an expert network of support moving forward, and a wide array of tools to empower teachers to integrate environmental sustainability
learning into the classroom. This integration instills meaningful connections between students, their local communities, and the real world challenges facing society as a whole. 

"This was one of the best conferences I have ever attended. I learned so much and came back professionally and personally reinvigorated about environmental sustainability," says Alice Drayton of the Naval Academy Primary School.  

Click here to learn more about the Independent School Environmental Leadership Conference.

 

—Text by John Lewis and Megan Fink; Photos by Jay Fleming

To learn more about the conference contact Tom Ackerman, CBF's Vice President for Education, at tackerman@cbf.org, John Lewis, The Gunston School's Headmaster, at jlewis@gunston.org, or Emily Beck, The Gunston School's Sustainability Coordinator, at ebeck@gunston.org.


This Week in the Watershed

Buffer-1200
Planting forested buffers on farms is an agricultural best management practice that tops the list as one of the most cost-effective ways to reduce pollution in the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams. Photo by Carmera Thomas/CBF Staff.

Pollution is the enemy of clean water. And if we want to leave a legacy of clean water to future generations, we need to take action. But what are the sources of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams? Pollution sources include but are not limited to agricultural runoff, urban/suburban polluted runoff, and wastewater treatment plants. Of these, agricultural runoff is by far the largest source of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution to the Bay.

While we all want clean water, it cannot be denied that fighting pollution is often expensive. From a purely economic perspective, we should implement the pollution reduction practices that give us the best bang for our buck. Fortunately, the least expensive ways to fight pollution also targets the largest source of pollution—agricultural runoff. Look no further than this graphic which was highlighted on page six of our most recent Save the Bay Magazine: Cost of ag reduction-1200The price tags speak volumes. While pollution needs to be cut across the board, it is clear that implementing best management practices (BMPs) on farms throughout the watershed is one of the most cost-effective ways to save the Bay. Moving forward, we need to help farmers through providing funding and technical assistance to implement BMPs, some of which include installing forested buffers, fencing livestock out of streams, and planting cover crops.

Ultimately, if we are to reach our clean water goals set forth in the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint, addressing agricultural runoff is paramount. Leaving a legacy of clean water to future generations is on the line.

Want to help CBF plant forested buffers in Maryland? Check out our upcoming plantings!

This Week in the Watershed: Meat Pollution, Dirty Water Infrastructure, and Farmers on a Boat

  • A group of farmers joined CBF on a boating trip on the Bay, learning how they can help with clean water efforts. (Suffolk News-Herald—VA)
  • Climate change threatens the Chesapeake Bay in several ways. (Public News Service—VA)
  • Excessive consumption of meat is high on the list of activities that contribute to excess nitrogen in our waterways. (Bay Journal)
  • While forest buffer plantings throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed are progressing, the annual target was missed. (Bay Program)
  • Local citizens and environmentalists are still concerned about the public health and environmental impact of the burgeoning poultry industry in Maryland's Wicomico County. (Daily Times—MD)
  • CBF and partners are working to plant the largest oyster garden in Baltimore. (Baltimore Style—MD)
  • Oyster restoration work resumed on Maryland's Tred Avon River sanctuary. There is still fear, however, that restoration work might encounter continued delays in the future. (Bay Journal)
  • Maryland's Anne Arundel County is working to improve water quality through tackling stormwater infrastructure repairs. (Capital Gazette—MD)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

September 10

  • Gambrills, MD: Help the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and partner organizations plant shrubs and wetland grasses at the former Naval Academy dairy farm! Sunrise Farm is an 800-acre farm, the largest organic farm in the State of Maryland. Volunteers will plant a newly graded wetland in what was a wet less productive corn & soybean field. Click here to register!

September 13

  • Richmond, VA: The Richmond VoiCeS Course, an eight-week adult education class meeting on Tuesdays, starts September 13! This course will cover the history of the James, urban and rural runoff issues and solutions, practical methods to improve water quality in your backyard, and the critical importance of citizen action to saving the Bay. Plus, there are field trips! Click here to register!

September 16-18

  • Oxon Hill, MD: During this three-day event (September 16-18), we will build concrete reef balls designed to help restore fish habitat in Smoots Bay on the Potomac River. The final destination for the reef balls is the bottom of Smoots Bay, where they will be intermixed with various woody structures to provide an ideal habitat for various fish species, such as our native largemouth bass. Come for one day or all three! Building reef balls is a fun and exciting way to help restore our Chesapeake Bay. Click here to register!

September 17

  • Trappe, MD: Help CBF take out the trash! Join us at Bill Burton Fishing Pier State Park to help make the Choptank River cleaner and safer. This is a family friendly event, but all children must be accompanied by an adult. Groups are welcome! Please wear clothes you don't mind getting dirty, and bring sunscreen and water. Click here to register!
  • Annapolis, MD: Join us for an upcoming trip aboard the CBF skipjack Stanley Norman. While aboard, you'll be invited to help hoist the sails or simply enjoy the view! You will leave with a better understanding of oysters and their role in keeping the Bay clean as well as what CBF is doing to restore the oyster stocks to save the Bay. Click here to register!

September 24

  • Annapolis, MD: Head out on the water for a morning of fishing, learning, and fun! Spend the morning aboard the Marguerite in search of whatever is biting! Our experienced crew will provide all the knowledge and equipment necessary—just bring your enthusiasm! Gear and licenses are provided. Click here to register!
  • Annapolis, MD: Join us for an upcoming trip aboard the CBF skipjack Stanley Norman. While aboard, you'll be invited to help hoist the sails or simply enjoy the view! You will leave with a better understanding of oysters and their role in keeping the Bay clean as well as what CBF is doing to restore the oyster stocks to save the Bay. Click here to register!
  • Dorchester County, MD: Join CBF for a paddle! We will put in our canoes on Beaverdam Creek, and from there explore the waters surrounding Taylors Island Wildlife Management Area and Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. This area is a prime example of a healthy tidal Eastern Shore waterway, replete with large expanses of tidal marsh and pine forests. The wildlife is dominated by various species of bird life, including nesting bald eagles, ospreys, herons, and ducks. The paddle is comfortable and peaceful, offering up-close views of herons fishing in the shallows and ducks nesting in the many trees along the banks. This is a paddle for people of all skill levels.  Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


Top 5 Facebook Posts of Summer!

Underwater grasses rebounding, horseshoe crabs crawling, Maryland winning (in Rio that is) . . . it's been quite a summer on CBF's Facebook Page! So, back by popular demand, we decided to look back at our top five Facebook posts of the summer. What's got people excited about our Bay, its rivers and streams? Take a look:

 

1. A River Reborn: Take a trip beneath the surface of the Severn where we see abundant grasses, scampering blue crabs, and thick, healthy oyster reefs—incredible signs of the Bay's recovery! With more than 212,000 views, this inspiring video has already secured a spot on Oscars' shortlist.  


2.
Do a Little Seahorse Dance



3. Did Someone Say Scallops? In the Bay?!



4. What's in the Water: Measurements of 450 times higher than federal safety limits?! That's what we found at some beautiful swimming holes across Maryland this summer when we tested the water for harmful bacteria after rainstorms. Watch our video (98,956 other people did) to learn more. 



5. Ches-a-peake Bay! Ches-a-peake Bay! That's what we were shouting during this summer's Rio Olympics when Maryland (the ninth-smallest state in the country, mind you) brought home a record number of medals, many of which were gold. Not only that—athletes from Virginia and D.C. certainly helped make the whole Chesapeake region the true champion (but it always was in our book). 

 
Be sure to follow us on Facebook (if you aren’t already) for the latest and greatest this fall!

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

 


Slowing the Flow: A Pioneering Parking Lot

How Virginia Can Stop Polluted Runoff with the Stormwater Local Assistance Fund

Aerial Completed Project
An aerial view of the completed project.

A parking lot isn't usually something to get excited about. But believe it or not, the Ashland Police Department's new lot is pretty innovative when it comes to fighting pollution.

It started a few years ago, when it was time to repave the aging asphalt at the police station in Ashland, a small town north of Richmond. At that time, Ashland Town Engineer Ingrid Stenbjørn was beginning to look for ways the town could cut the amount of polluted runoff entering local waterways in an effort to meet new Virginia requirements.

Instead of just covering the parking lot with a new layer of asphalt, Stenbjørn suggested installing permeable pavers. On most paved areas, when it rains, water just runs off the hard surfaces, washing dirt, oil, grime, grease, and other pollution into nearby streams and rivers. However, permeable pavers allow water to pass through, effectively stopping much of this polluted runoff.

Stream Before
Before the project started.

The project at the police station was the perfect chance to upgrade the lot with something more environmentally friendly. "Every time we have a maintenance need here in the town, we consider if there's a way we can also reduce the amount of pollution that goes into our waters," Stenbjørn said.

There was just one problem. Ashland had a tight budget that year, and permeable pavers aren't the cheapest option upfront. Fortunately, the town was able to get support from Virginia's Stormwater Local Assistance Fund, which provides matching funds to effective projects that reduce runoff. Together with a separate grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Ashland could pay for the whole effort. "It was a really bad budget year, but those grants made this project possible," Stenbjørn said.

Even better, the grants also funded the restoration of a small stream that runs next to the parking lot. Before the work, the stream was in bad shape. It had a huge drainage area, and storms would send polluted runoff gushing through its deep channel, doing a lot of damage in the process. There was almost no life in the stream.

Stream After
After the project was completed.

The restoration widened the channel, which now allows flow from storms to spread out and slow down. Native plants are now taking hold in the new floodplain, helping absorb more of the water. Frogs and birds have returned to the stream.

Since the project's completion in November 2015, it's not only cut down on pollution, but has also created a mini oasis next to the station. Ashland Police Department Chief Douglas Goodman said that the Department "was pleased to be a part of such an earth-friendly project. In addition to being environmentally sound, the new creek bed is such a pleasant sight to see and can be quite calming."

The Numbers

 
Total Project Cost $367,957 
Stormwater Local Assistance Fund Share $168,500
Construction Start June 2015
Project Completion November 2015

 

Stay tuned for more stories of how innovative projects like these can help Virginia stop harmful polluted runoff from entering our rivers, streams, and Bay!  

—Text by Kenny Fletcher, CBF's Virginia Communications Coordinator; Photos by Ingrid Stenbjorn

 


Photo of the Week: A Really Nice Backyard

IMG_1947
[This] is a photo my wife Roberta took of us cruising across Nomini Bay on the lower Potomac leaving Shark Tooth Island and heading back to our summer place on the Lower Machodoc Creek [earlier this summer]. It took a few shots to get the boat waves to align with the sunset and clouds. 

We spend a great deal of time on the Lower Potomac and Bay around Point Lookout, fishing, crabbing, and pleasure cruising. Roberta always comments that we have a really nice back yard!

—Greg Sharpe

Ensure that Greg, Roberta, and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


This Week in the Watershed

Lafayette River bloom-1200
Algal blooms, such as this one by Hampton Roads, Virginia on the Lafayette River, are caused by excess nutrients such as nitrogen. Photo by Christy Everett/CBF Staff.

We all love clean water, but sometimes the path to achieving it is not all that "sexy." From talk of septic systems to land use management, to excess nutrients, the science and policy of clean water can be rather tedious and boring. One of the excess nutrients that fall in this category is nitrogen. While discussion of nitrogen might give us flashbacks to a boring science class, a la Ben Stein in Ferris Bueller's Day Off, it has a massive impact on clean water. Today, roughly 300 million pounds of polluting nitrogen reaches the Chesapeake Bay—about six times the amount that reached the bay in the 1600s. This excess nitrogen leads to a bevy of problems, including feeding algal blooms that block sunlight to underwater grasses and suck up life-supporting oxygen when they die and decompose leading to "dead zones."

Nitrogen comes from a variety of sources, including sewage treatment plants, animal feed lots, and polluted runoff from crop land, urban, and suburban areas. The inescapable truth is that we all produce nitrogen through everyday choices. Collectively, these make a huge impact on our Bay and its rivers and streams. Everything from how we get around to the food we eat contributes to the pollution affecting our region. But it can be tough to know just how exactly your day-to-day life affects the health of the Bay and its rivers and streams.

After partnering with researchers from the University of Virginia, CBF has released a Bay Footprint Calculator. This tool will show you how you stack up against other people in your area and offer tips on how you can improve your grade by making simple changes in your daily life. Find out how well you're doing to prevent harmful pollution from getting into our waters. Fill out the calculator now and get your score!

All of this is inextricably linked to the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint. If we want to leave a legacy of clean water to the next generation, the Blueprint needs to be fully implemented. And to rid our waters of excess nutrients such as nitrogen, we each need to recognize our individual impact and make changes. Click here to get your pollution grade and find out how you can improve.

This Week in the Watershed: Nitrogen Tool, Bacteria Testing, and A Mysterious Nutrient

  • The release of a new online tool allows citizens to identify the amount of nitrogen they produce. (UPI)
  • Environmental nonprofits are helping restore communities not only through improving the environment but by providing ex-convicts jobs. (Bay Journal)
  • Maryland's Harford County is implementing a multifaceted approach in their stormwater remediation efforts to reduce polluted runoff. (Baltimore Sun—MD)
  • Bacteria testing conducted by CBF throughout Maryland also found unsafe bacteria levels, including fecal matter in White Marsh Run 400 times higher than safety standards permit. (Perry Hall Patch—MD)
  • Bacteria testing conducted by CBF throughout south-central Pennsylvania has found bacteria levels unsafe for swimming. (Patriot News—PA)
  • Scientists are attempting to solve the mystery of the ultimate destination of excess nitrogen from agricultural application. (Lancaster Farming—PA)

What's Happening around the Watershed?

September 10

  • Gambrills, MD: Come help the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and partner organizations plant shrubs and wetland grasses at the former Naval Academy dairy farm! Sunrise Farm is an 800 acre farm, the largest organic farm in the State of Maryland. Volunteers will plant a newly graded wetland in what was a wet less productive corn & soy-bean field. Click here to register!

September 13

  • Richmond, VA: The Richmond VoiCeS Course, an eight-week adult education class meeting on Tuesdays, starts September 13! This course will cover the history of the James, urban and rural runoff issues and solutions, practical methods to improve water quality in your backyard, and the critical importance of citizen action to saving the bay. Plus, there are field trips! Click here to register!

September 16-18

  • Oxon Hill, MD: During this three-day event (September 16-18), we will build concrete reef balls designed to help restore fish habitat in Smoots Bay on the Potomac River. The reef balls will be relocated to the bottom of Smoots Bay, where they will be intermixed with various woody structures to provide an ideal habitat for various fish species, such as our native largemouth bass. Come for one day or all three! Building reef balls is a fun and exciting way to help restore our Chesapeake Bay. Click here to register!

September 17

  • Trappe, MD: Help CBF take out the trash! Join us at Bill Burton Fishing Pier State Park to help make the Choptank River cleaner and safer. This is a family friendly event, but all children must be accompanied by an adult. Groups are welcome! Please wear clothes you don't mind getting dirty, and bring sunscreen and water. Click here to register!
  • Annapolis, MD: Join us for an upcoming trip aboard the CBF skipjack Stanley Norman. While aboard, you'll be invited to help hoist the sails or simply enjoy the view! You will leave with a better understanding of oysters and their role in keeping the Bay clean as well as what CBF is doing to restore the oyster stocks to save the Bay. Click here to register!

September 24

  • Annapolis, MD: Head out on the water for a morning of fishing, learning, and fun! Spend the morning aboard the Marguerite in search of whatever is biting! Our experienced crew will provide all the knowledge and equipment necessary—just bring your enthusiasm! Gear and licenses are provided. Click here to register!
  • Annapolis, MD: Join us for an upcoming trip aboard the CBF skipjack Stanley Norman. While aboard, you'll be invited to help hoist the sails or simply enjoy the view! You will leave with a better understanding of oysters and their role in keeping the Bay clean as well as what CBF is doing to restore the oyster stocks to save the Bay. Click here to register!
  • Dorchester County, MD: Join CBF for a paddle! We will put in our canoes on Beaverdam Creek, and from there explore the waters surrounding Taylors Island Wildlife Management Area and Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. This area is a prime example of a healthy tidal Eastern Shore waterway, replete with large expanses of tidal marsh and pine forests. The wildlife is dominated by various species of bird life, including nesting bald eagles, ospreys, herons, and ducks. The paddle is comfortable and peaceful, offering up-close views of herons fishing in the shallows and ducks nesting in the many trees along the banks. This is a paddle for people of all skill levels.  Click here to register!

—Drew Robinson, CBF's Digital Media Associate


We Should Ramp up Bay Restoration, Not Roll Back Protections

The following first appeared in the Gazette-Journal.

Lenz_1200
Gloucester County is considering reducing regulations for land use rules which protect water quality. Photo by Garth Lenz/iLCP.

After decades of restoration efforts, the Chesapeake Bay is finally starting to show promising signs. The oyster population is beginning to rebound. At times, water has been the clearest in decades. Underwater grasses sway in the shallows.

But this recovery is fragile. That's why it's troubling that Gloucester County's Board of Supervisors may back off from its restoration commitments. At its September 6 meeting, the board will consider weakening protections under the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act that have been in place for decades, the first Virginia locality to consider reversing course in this manner.

Instead of rolling back protections, we need to remain on course to save the bay. Gloucester's rivers, creeks, and inlets have always been one of its biggest assets. Their natural beauty attracts people who visit and stay. Their bounty has long sustained watermen and is leading to the comeback of the Middle Peninsula's oyster industry.

In fact, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Virginia Oyster Restoration Center at Gloucester Point depends on a healthy York River to raise oysters for the bay.

Gloucester shouldn't put its waterways or the bay's recovery at risk. More pollution would threaten aquatic life and increase human health risks. The proposal to reduce countywide protections won't spur growth or reduce administrative costs. Instead, it would actually add costs and paperwork to citizens and businesses that buy and develop land.

The proposal would reduce the area within the county covered by the Bay Act's Resource Management Area (RMA), where current land use rules protect water quality. Right now, the Gloucester County RMA is countywide, meaning that everyone follows the same rules.

But the proposal in front of the board would reduce Gloucester's RMA to just about the smallest total area allowed. However, state law would still require sensitive areas like wetlands, floodplains, and places with erodible soil to be covered by the RMA. Defining these areas would cause headaches for developers, businesses, and homeowners. In the end, Gloucester would have a patchwork of development rules across property lines, creating uncertainty and adding to project costs.

Gloucester County staff have opposed the change. Likewise, the local realtors, business owners, and residents on the board-appointed Go Green Gloucester Advisory Committee recognized that the proposed changes would create "a regulatory landscape that is needlessly complex."

Even large commercial development wouldn't see benefits from the proposal. Development projects over an acre must meet state rules for stormwater management and erosion and sediment control. Given that, changes aren't likely to "have a great impact on economic development in the form of attracting new business," county staff said this summer in a memo to the board.

In short, the county has little to gain economically and a lot at risk for the environment. Fortunately, it's not too late. Gloucester residents can meet with their supervisor or go to the September 6 meeting to ensure that future generations have cleaner water than we do today.

—Rebecca LePrell, CBF Virginia Executive Director

Gloucester Residents: Contact your member on the Board of Supervisors and attend the meeting on September 6 to join us in defending the Chesapeake Bay Act rules.


Photo of the Week: Bay Bridge Sunset

Image1
This early August sunset photo of the Bay Bridge and the Chesapeake was taken from Hemingway's Restaurant.

The Chesapeake means a great deal to myself and family simply because it's a way of life . . . we need to protect it so we can continue to enjoy its beauty.

—Carly Anello

Ensure that Carly, her family, and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint—the plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Chesapeake photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Labor Day Picnic Recipes We Love (Without the Meat!)

Juicy burgers dripping with cheese, steak grilled to perfection, that hot dog crammed with pickles and ketchup and hot mustard . . . sounds like a Labor Day picnic (and heartburn) to us! But here's an idea: What if we were to swap the burger for some healthy and equally delicious (if not more so) meatless meals this Labor Day?

After all, as our new and improved Bay Footprint Calculator indicates, if everyone in the Bay region only ate the recommended amount of protein (instead of the 30 percent more than needed as the USDA reports), the resulting nitrogen pollution reductions would be equivalent to what is needed to Save the Bay. Seriously. It's as simple as that! That's enough to inspire us to back off the beef this Labor Day. How about you? To get you started, here are some of our favorite veggie-inspired and oh-so-yummy dishes perfect for that Labor Day picnic. Mouth, get ready to water!

 

Quinoa Salad with cherriesSpinach Quinoa Salad with Cherries and Toasted Almonds

Salad:
1/3 cup sliced almonds
1 ½ cups quinoa
1 bag of baby spinach
2 cups of fresh cherries, pitted and chopped (sub 1 cup of dried cherries when fresh are not in season)
1 cucumber, peeled and diced
½ red onion, peeled and finely chopped (½ cup)
1 15 oz. can of chickpeas, rinsed and drained

Dressing:
¼ cup of plain yogurt
3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil (a citrus flavored olive oil would probably be great, too)
2 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice
2 cloves of garlic, minced or pressed
Salt and pepper to taste

Prepare the quinoa according to package directions (3 cups of salted water for 1 ½ cups quinoa should do it). Once finished, spread it out on a plate or baking sheet and put in the fridge to cool. Heat a small unoiled skillet over medium heat and add the almonds. Toast until almonds are lightly browned, stirring frequently to avoid burning. Once quinoa is cool, put all the salad ingredients accept spinach together in a large bowl and mix. Wisk together all dressing ingredients until smooth. Pour dressing over salad and mix to coat. Place salad in fridge for roughly 30 minutes to allow flavors to develop. Serve over a bed of spinach.


Image1Creamy Black Bean and Cilantro Dip

Ingredients:
2 ½ cups cooked black beans
1/3 cup vegetable broth
2 cloves garlic
Juice of 1 line
Pinch of salt
½ teaspoon chili powder
¼ cup chopped cilantro
½ cup chopped green onions (put aside a tiny bit for topping)
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Sauté garlic briefly. Throw all ingredients except cheese into a food processor and run until creamy. Top with shredded cheddar cheese and a sprinkling of chopped green onion. Serve hot, cold, or room temperature. For a vegan option, just skip the cheese!

 

IMG_0544Tomato-Corn Pasta Salad

Ingredients:
5 tablespoons of olive oil
4 tablespoons of rice vinegar
1 tablespoon of balsamic vinegar
½ cup chopped fresh basil
2 large garlic cloves, chopped
1 ½ cup fresh corn kernels (cut from 3 ears) or frozen, thawed
1 ¼ pounds tomatoes
8 ounces pasta (such as bowties or penne), freshly cooked
½ cup of feta cheese

Whisk 4 tablespoons oil, vinegar, and basil in large bowl to blend. Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add corn and garlic, sauté three minutes. Add corn and garlic to dressing in bowl. Add tomatoes, pasta, and cheese to bowl and toss to blend. Season salad with salt and pepper.

 

Grilled Eggplant Involtini with Tomato Sauce

Ingredients:
6 pounds heirloom tomatoes
Olive oil
One onion, finely chopped
4 cloves of garlic minced
Large bunch of basil
1 bag of baby spinach
3 eggplant sliced long ways into ¼ inch slices
2 cups fresh dipped Ricotta
1 cup shredded fresh mozzarella
1 ½ cup Parmesan cheese
2 eggs beaten
Zest of 1 lemon
4 cloves of chopped roasted garlic
1 tablespoons of fresh chopped thyme   
Salt and pepper

For the tomato sauce:

Cut the stems of the tomato, score the bottom with an X, and blanch. Peel the tomatoes and roughly chop. Sauté the onion and four minced cloves of garlic in olive oil. Add chopped tomatoes and simmer 15-20 minutes.

For the involtini:

Brush both sides of the sliced eggplant with olive oil, and generously salt and pepper. Grill the eggplant over high heat until browned and limp. Mix cheeses, roasted garlic, lemon zest, beaten eggs, and thyme. Place three spinach leaves, one leaf of basil, and cheese mixture on the large end of the eggplant and roll it up. Repeat with all slices of eggplant. Place a small amount of the tomato sauce in the bottom of a gratin dish. Put the rolled up eggplant on the sauce. Top with more sauce and any remaining cheese mixture. Bake at 350 until bubbling.

 

Asian Cole Slaw

Ingredients:
2 packages Ramen noodles (any flavor works)
2 packages of “broccoli slaw”
1 cup sliced toasted almonds
1 cup sunflower seeds
1 bunch of green onions (chopped)
½ cup sugar
¼ cup vegetable oil
1/3 cup white vinegar (you can also use rice vinegar or do half and half)

Crush noodles into large bowl. Top with slaw, onions, almonds, sunflower seeds. In separate small bowl, mix seasoning packets (from the ramen noodles), sugar, oil, and vinegar. Pour over slaw and chill for 24 hours or overnight. Toss before serving.

 

White Bean Roll-Ups

Ingredients:
1 can of white cannelloni beans
Soft flour or whole wheat tortillas
¼ cup finely diced cilantro
One (or more to taste) diced jalapeno pepper
1 cup of shredded cheese
Half a lime squeezed juice
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven at 425. Drain and mash the cannelloni beans and fold in the rest of the ingredients. Divide evenly among tortillas and roll them up. Bake in oven for 15-20 minutes.

Optional Dipping Sauce:

1/3 cup mayo
1 tablespoon chili paste
Half a lime of lime juice
½ tablespoon basil paste (or finely chopped basil)
Fresh or dried cilantro to taste

Combine, then stir in fresh water to reach dressing consistency.

 

Cold Asian Noodles

Ingredients:
4 cups of fresh, crunchy vegetables like snow peas, bell peppers, cucumbers, scallions (combine a few vegetables if possible)
12 ounces pasta (Chinese egg noodles, linguine, or even angel hair will do)
2 tablespoons dark sesame oil
½ cup tahini (or peanut butter if necessary)
1 tablespoon sugar
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon rice or white wine vinegar
A splash of Tabasco to taste
Pepper to taste

Cut vegetables in long strips (or peel/seed peas) while cooking pasta—toss cooked pasta with a little bit of sesame oil. Whisk together sesame oil, tahini, sugar, soy, ginger, vinegar, Tabasco, and pepper—thin the sauce with hot water until the consistency of heavy cream. Toss the noodles with sauce and add vegetables.

 

Happy cooking (and eating)! And don't forget to check out our Bay Footprint Calculator to get your pollution score. While there, you'll get tips for how you can improve your grade by making simple, healthy changes in your daily life, including eating less meat!

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

 


Photo of the Week: Dog Days of Chesapeake Summer

Dogs are our link to paradise. They don't know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious afternoon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring—it was peace. —Milan Kundera

In honor of National Dog Day today, we're celebrating all our amazing four-legged friends who love the Bay and its rivers and streams as much as we do! Check out these fantastic photos below and on our Facebook Photo Album from dog and Bay lovers all across the region. If not for us, let's #SaveTheBay for our beloved Chesapeake pups! Learn more about how you can help. 

—Emmy Nicklin, CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

SummerMaggieWoody_JillLindahlReyes
Summer, Maggie, and Woody in their favorite place to float and swim off Indian Creek in the Severn River. Photo courtesy of Jill Lindahl Reyes.
Muggles_TracyMcMullen
Muggles! Photo courtesy of Tracy McMullen.
Millie (2)
Millie loves the shallows of the Chesapeake Bay and riding on the bow of the boat down the Chickahominy River. Photo courtesy of Matt Ferguson.
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Teddy and his cousin Marley in the marshes of Dorchester County. Happy dogs burning off the leftovers from Thanksgiving during a romp across the lowcountry. Photo courtesy of John Rodenhausen.

 

CarolDeLuca_30794604_IMG_2640BoyandDog
A boy and his dog. Photo by Carol DeLuca.