Photo of the Week: Low Tide at Hughlett Point

GregWinterI took an early morning sunrise hike on the trails of Hughlett Park Natural Area Preserve in Northumberland County, Virginia, with my friend, Claire Forsyth. [We walked] to the undeveloped shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay.  

At the early morning sunrise during low tide on this June 18 morning, Claire took advantage of the serene, natural, and peaceful vista on display to meditate with a little yoga.

—Spence Winter

Ensure that Spence, Claire, and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprintthe federal/state plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite summertime Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!

GregWinter2

 

 


Photo of the Week: Corrotoman Sunset


Sunset 614I took this photo from my dock, at the point where the Corrotoman River empties into the Rappahannock this past Saturday evening.

The Bay is alive, and on any given day her temperament can be docile for hours, followed without any warning by a swift change in mood as the tides turn, evoking turbulent waters, churning with rays and menhaden.

For us the Bay evokes a deep respect, and serves as a daily reminder that life is fluid and unpredictable, and above all, to be enjoyed.

—Amber Price

Ensure that Amber and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights like these along the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprintthe federal/state plan to Save the Bay! 

Do you have a favorite Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Photo of the Week: Winter Is Coming

BillPortlock3Photo by Bill Portlock/CBF Staff.

"There's a certain slant of light,
Winter afternoons,
That oppresses, like the heft,
Of cathedral tunes . . . "

—Emily Dickinson, Poem 258

Photographer and CBF's Senior Educator Bill Portlock captured the icy, golden-hour sunset above from Bishops Head, Maryland, several winters ago.

At this time of year when darkness sets in way too early, when slap-happy winds turn your cheeks a ruddy hue, it's easy to hibernate indoors. But don't forget, we've still got lots going on! From member meetings, to advocacy and volunteer trainings, to Christmas tree/wreath sales, to polluted runoff workshops—winter is yet another busy and productive season for us, and we hope you'll come out and join us. See our events calendar for more.      

So bundle up, get out there, and enjoy those winter afternoons

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media

Do you have a favorite, winter-themed Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to me at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay and its waters mean to you. We look forward to seeing your photos! 


Remembering Why We Do What We Do on #GivingTuesday


ElaineYes, today is #GivingTuesday—that day celebrated around the world that reminds us that this time of year isn't just about getting, it's also about giving . . . giving gifts, giving time, giving kindness, giving . . . whatever. 

And as I thought more and more about this day, I found myself looking for inspiration from all my favorite writers and leaders and poets and philosophers. (Yes, I even resorted to googling "famous quotes about giving.")

And I can spew out some pretty fantastic ones: Take Maya Angelou's "I have found that among its other benefits, giving liberates the soul of the giver." Or Albert Einstein's "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it." 

And Ralph Waldo Emerson's ever-thoughtful "It is one of the most beautiful compensations of this life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself . . . Serve and thou shall be served."

JenBut often what's more real, more inspiring, more tangible than those giants of ideas and idealism that, these days, live only in books and on the Internet, are those people around us, every day doing their work quietly but with great passion and pride. 

I asked Elaine Lutz, our Maryland Office attorney, what brought her to CBF, and why she does what she does. Her simple six-word answer speaks for itself: "I believe in Nature's intrinsic value."

Our Managing Editor Jen Wallace listed the names of her two children, eight-year-old Martha and five-year-old Eamon, as her reasons for getting up every morning and doing what she does.  

Jocelyn Tuttle, our Baltimore Harbor Program educator, spoke of the rivers and streams that inspire her everyday to teach the next generation of Bay stewards.  

LucasOur Student Leadership Coordinator Lucas Johnson wholeheartedly gives his time and energy to Saving the Bay because he loves exploring the great outdoors.   

All of these colleagues inspire me as I work alongside them for a healthy, restored Chesapeake now and for generations to come

Whatever your reason may be, we hope you'll think of the Bay and its rivers and streams this Giving Tuesday.     

—Emmy Nicklin
CBF's Senior Manager of Digital Media
 

What inspires you? Click here to send us your clean water story.

Jocelyn


Photo of the Week: One Whole Heck of a Lot!

058This picture was taken July 6, 2014, at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.

I started out in 1980 with a 24-foot Penn Yan cabin cruiser . . . we now have a 46-foot Tartan sailboat, and are retired.

So far this year, we headed out in late May and returned to our "land home" in mid-July. We went from Rock Hall to Cape Charles and everywhere in between.

We're headed out again Labor Day Weekend into November for our late summer/fall cruise. We can't wait. 

The Chesapeake Bay means one whole heck of a lot to me!

—Darlene Arrivillaga 

 

Ensure that Darlene and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary adventures on the Chesapeake. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint! 

Do you have a favorite Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's E-Communications Manager, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Photo of the Week: The Best Way to See the Bay

2680_Shady Side - Riverfest (14-Jun-14)Wc1

As a paddler, the best way to see and experience the Chesapeake is by sea kayak. Sea kayakers throughout the Chesapeake Bay Region have begun a series of paddling trips that span the newly accessible 100-mile Anne Arundel County Water Trail.

In this photo taken last month, members of Washington Kayak Club pose to celebrate our safe return from our first inaugural 14-mile round-trip paddle from the West/Rhodes River to Deep Creek after laboring through a small craft advisory on the Chesapeake Bay the last five miles. It would have not have been possible were it not for the new car-top boat ramp at Shady Side, MD.

—Dom J. Manalo

Ensure that these paddlers and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint! 

Do you have a favorite Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's E-Communications Manager, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Photo of the Week: Sharing the Bay

Redmond_CandD-2307

There are always the nice nature shots, but the Bay is also about commerce. Here is a shot of a large ship passing under the bridge at Chesapeake City on the C&D Canal. As a boater, I see the daily sharing of the Bay between nature and man.

Michael Redmond

Ensure that Michael and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary sights like these. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint! 

Do you have a favorite Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's E-Communications Manager, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Smith Island as I Recall it 35 Years Ago . . .

HIST 0012
Some of CBF's original educators (clockwise from top): Bill Goldsborough (now CBF's Director of Fisheries), Don Baugh (now CBF's Vice President for Education), John Page Williams (now CBF's Senior Naturalist), Richard Maldeis, and Dick Lay.

This year CBF's Smith Island Education Program celebrates its 35th Anniversary. Below its first educator and founder Bill Goldsborough reflects on the early days of the program, inspiring and transforming students in this unique island community.

I had never been to Smith Island when I was hired by CBF in September 1978 to start a field education program there. My initiation came during a weekend trip to nearby Fox Island. Don Baugh, Richard Maldeis, and I ran across Tangier Sound in one of CBF's T-Crafts on a mission to scout the area where we would soon be running field experiences.

We motored up Tyler's Creek from the south, flanking "Fishing Creek Marsh," a plot of marshland that CBF had purchased from local elders Paul and Ullie Marshall. We felt CBF would have standing as a landowner, and we would be able to preserve these fragile wetlands. Well, with hindsight, it didn't quite rise to the level of buying waterfront in Arizona, but the lesson learned was that you really can't "own" a tidal marsh in a traditional sense, and the tide was going to ebb and flow through its creeks and guts and keep the marsh alive and vibrant no matter who owned it on paper.

Nevertheless, the broad expanse of Tyler's Creek was beautiful that fall afternoon, at least until we ran aground. It was a sudden but not jarring experience as the mud bottom closed its grip on our boat and eased it to a stop. Lesson number two: the waters around Smith Island are very shallow! In fact, as we learned in many other encounters with the bottom and taught to the students on our field experiences, the landscape, above and below the water, is very flat. There are very few lines of elevation on either topo maps of the scant bits of upland or nautical charts of the local waters. The result, it turns out, is one of the most intimate intersections of land and water around and a microcosm of how the convergence of tidal and photosynthetic energy make the Chesapeake system so productive.

Edblog
One of the first groups of students on CBF's Smith Island Education Program. Photo courtesy of Bill Goldsborough/CBF Staff.

CBF bought a house in Tylerton, one of three villages on the island, as the home base for our field programs. Many of my fondest memories involve that house, sold to us by Norwood Tull before moving to the "mainland" after a lifetime on the water. As a single family home with only one bathroom, it required a few modifications before it could support school groups of 20-plus students. Bunk beds were brought in, and kitchen capacity was expanded, but the biggest challenge proved to be installing a second bathroom, something Don and I barely completed lying on our backs in mud puddles under the house just hours before the first group arrived!

Once we were up and running, each three-day field experience brought that house to life. Dinners were daily adventures as the middle and high school students tried their hand at mixing crab cakes and frying oysters. Evening gatherings around the chalk board were like game shows as each kid competed to recount what we had learned that day. Eventually, faces appeared at the windows and back door as island kids let their curiosity get the best of them. The interactions that ensued were hilarious and heart-warming as island and suburban cultures intermingled. Many of those local kids became life-long friends, some even growing up to become CBF field educators.

During my two years on Smith Island, the reality of the flat landscape sank in as both the boundary for life on the island and the theme for the many field trips I ran. The twice-daily pulsing of the tide into the eight-mile long filigree of marsh determined where the ferry could run, where crabs, ducks, and terrapin could live, and where local watermen hunted for them. On field experiences we talked about "habitat" and how one inch more in elevation caused salt marsh cordgrass to give way to salt meadow hay and how that effected what could live there. It was a life-changing experience to be part of that community (human and biological) and to watch each group of students become suddenly aware of its natural rhythms.

—Bill Goldsborough, CBF's Director of Fisheries and First Smith Island Educator

Learn more about this and other milestone anniversaries for our Education Program in the latest issue of Save the Bay magazine.


Photo of the Week: Friday Morning on the Patuxent

Friday_MorningPhoto by Sailuk Joe Breese.

My wife Shiny and I have the good fortune of living in St. Mary's County, along the banks of the Patuxent River at Drum Cliffs. Our beach and pier sit almost directly across from the tip of Broomes Island. This photo was taken from the boat on the Patuxent, between Broomes Island and Drum Cliffs on Oct. 4 . . . the scenery gets more beautiful [here] as each day goes by.

—Sailuk Joe Breese

Ensure that Sailuk and future generations continue to enjoy extraordinary places like these. Support the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint! 

Do you have a favorite Bay photo you'd like to submit to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Photo of the Week contest? Send your digital images to CBF's E-Communications Manager, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo, and what the Chesapeake Bay means to you. We look forward to seeing your photos!


Photo of the Week: Your Favorite Summertime Shots

KidsKayak_TrapPondA family kayaking and fishing on Trap Pond in Laurel, Delaware. Photo by Octavio Abruto/iLCP.

Do you have a favorite summertime photo in/on/near the water? We want to see it! We're collecting special summer moments and memories and compiling them into a Facebook photo album to share with other Bay lovers. What better way to celebrate the Chesapeake waters we all love so much. Send us your photos now to be included in the album!

Send your digital images to CBF's E-Communications Manager, Emmy Nicklin, at enicklin [at sign] cbf.org, along with a brief description of where and when you took the photo. We look forward to seeing your photos!