Baby Planz has arrived! Huzzah!

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Clagett Farm has a new member of the team—Theodore (“Teddy”) Jared Planz. He was born at 7:00 this morning, much to the relief of Elissa and Jared. They are all well and exhausted. Teddy is 8 pounds, 3 ounces, and 20 inches long. 
Many of you have seen Elissa working hard up until the last days of her pregnancy--especially those of you who pick up at the farm on Wednesdays. 
You're amazing, Elissa!  Teddy is the best thing this farm has grown all year.  

It's a good time to be a mama cow at Clagett Farm

IMG_3869bWe're up to ten calves, including a pair of twins!  And there's at least a dozen more to come.  Then in April, the new baby lambs will be born.  

The cows don't let you get close enough to pet them, but a patient visitor (human--not canine) can get to within a few yards.  So it may be chilly out, but it's still a good time to visit.

Cows serve an important purpose in the ecosystem of our farm.  They eat the grass and return those nutrients right back to the soil where it came from.  Much of this property is far too hilly to plant vegetables.  The vegetables we grow are annual plants that don't compete well with weeds.  We have to till the soil bare in order to get the vegetables established, and on these hillsides, rain would carry our precious soil into our streams, turning it from an asset into pollution.  We're constantly experimenting with growing organic vegetables with reduced tillage, but none of those techniques work well enough yet to allow us to plant on a steep slope.  Cows allow us to create a marketable product from these nutrient-poor slopes, while holding our soil in place.  That perennial grass they're eating is also constantly adding carbon into the soil, pulling it out of the atmosphere.  Thank you, cows! 


Now On Sale: Clagett Farm's Pasture-Raised Beef

Chesapeake Grass-fed Beef
Your purchasing choices can help ‘Save the Bay’!

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Spring 2017 Beef Sale   -    Order Now
Experience some of the Chesapeake region’s finest beef!

Good pastures lead to great cows and healthy, nutritious meat; and are good for protecting the water quality of the Bay.  Our Red Angus and Red Devon cows are raised 100% on pastures and hay without any hormones or antibiotics.

What You Need to Know About Purchasing the Grass-Fed Beef

High Quality Beef Processing

  • Meat is frozen in individual cuts and vacuum sealed in clear packages (which helps retain cold, prevents freezer burn, and greatly prolongs storage life).
  • Our butcher is Mount Airy Meat Shop, a family run, well respected, and USDA certified shop. 
  • The meat is dry-aged, which means that it is hung at the meat shop for a little over two weeks to provide maximum tenderness.

A ‘lateral quarter’ is sold @ $8.50/lb. The weights will vary based upon the individual cows’ but will range from 75-95lbs/quarter.  You can request to have a smaller quarter or a larger quarter, depending on your needs.

Pick up:
Meat must be picked up at Clagett Farm on Saturday, June 17th, between 10 a.m. – 1p.m.  An email reminder will be sent out to all who order.

 

TO ORDER  (and for more information on meat cuts)

Go to the CBF Clagett Farm website and click on ‘grass-fed beef’ (http://www.cbf.org/about-us/office-operations/clagett-farm/grass-fed-beef ).  If you have questions (or difficulties with the website) feel free to email mheller@cbf.org


Now For Sale: Chesapeake Grass-fed Beef

 

 

Your purchasing choices can help ‘Save the Bay’!

Clagett cows

Experience some of the Chesapeake region’s finest beef!

 

Good pastures lead to great cows and healthy, nutritious meat; and are good for protecting the water quality of the Bay.  Our Red Angus and Red Devon cows are raised 100% on pastures and hay without any hormones or antibiotics. 

High Quality Beef Processing

  • Meat is frozen in individual cuts and vacuum sealed in clear packages (which helps retain cold, prevents freezer burn, and greatly prolongs storage life).
  • Our butcher is Mount Airy Meat Shop, a family run, well respected, and USDA certified shop. 
  • The meat is dry-aged, which means that it is hung at the meat shop for a little over two weeks to provide maximum tenderness.
  • A ‘lateral quarter’ is sold @ $8.00/lb. The weights will vary based upon the individual cows’ but will range from 75-90lbs/quarter.  You can request to have a smaller quarter or a larger quarter, depending on your needs.

Pick up: Meat must be picked up at Clagett Farm on Saturday, June 11th, between 10 a.m. – 1p.m.  An email reminder will be sent out to all who order.

You can order (and find more information on meat cuts) at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation website.  If you have questions feel free to email Michael at mheller@cbf.org


Beef still available, limited time--Now Sold Out

 

The beef is now sold out.  If you would like to purchase beef in spring or fall 2016, send an email to mheller@cbf.org.

Right now, for just a few weeks, we have beef for sale.  Here's the low-down:

  • All of our cows are 100% grass-fed--no grain, no hormones, no antibiotics.  
  • $7.50/pound for a full quarter, which is about 80 pounds of a mix of steaks, roasts and ground beef.  
  • $8.00/pound for 20-50 pounds.  You may select the cuts of meat.  
  • The beef is vacuum-packed and frozen.  

If you're interested in placing an order, or have questions, send a note to Michael: mheller@cbf.org.

 Steak

 


Join Us for the Spring Open House: Saturday May 9!

Clagett spring open house

Things are looking green out here on Clagett Farm, so we're announcing our Spring Open House, happening Saturday, May 9. We hope you can join us! 

The event will run from 1-4 p.m. There will be hay rides and field tours and we'll show off our six brand new sheep, who will be thrilled to meet you. CSA members will be able to take a seedling. This is a free event, open to the public. Please join us! 

For members who are unable to make it, we look forward to seeing you at the first CSA pick-ups of the season. We hope the first pickup will happen Wednesday, May 13 (farm and Dupont pick-ups) and Saturday, May 16 (at the farm). We're not 100% confident of that date yet. Expect to get more information about that, and everything you need to know for the first pick-up, shortly. 

We look forward to seeing you all on May 9!

~ Farmer Carrie

 


Headed to Baltimore?

We have a few items we need to pick up from a greenhouse supplier (Maryland Plants and Supplies) on the southern edge of Baltimore city.  If anyone will be driving from there to Upper Marlboro (or Takoma Park or Bowie) in the near future, we'd love it if you could pick up a few boxes for us.  

Much obliged,

-Carrie


Bring on spring!

Wondering how your crops are progressing?  Here's a few updates:

  • The greenhouse plants are growing well!  No groundhog invasions this year.  Here's a photo I took on March 27th.  In the foreground, you see some kohlrabi that we planted last week and some cabbages that we planted today.           Greenhouse 3-25-14
  • We planted 50 Asian pear trees.  It will take a few years before they produce much, but we have high hopes!  
  • Elysian Energy's monthly volunteers just helped us plant 100 rhubarb crowns, and today we put in the last of 1000 new asparagus crowns.  Again, we won't pick them for a few years, but you're patient, right?
  • We're midway through the job of putting up an 8' fence around the perimeter of our newest crop of strawberry plants.  
  • The first carrots just germinated!  Lots more seed are in the ground and nearly ready to sprout:  lettuce, mustard greens, kale, collards, radishes, turnips, fennel, bok choi, spinach, arugula, 
  • Looking especially good in the greenhouse right now:  tomatoes!  Peppers, eggplant, cucumbers, squash, swiss chard, herbs and flowers are also coming along nicely.  
  • Here's a photo of the new turkey that one of our volunteers, Alla, brought to wander our fields.  He's surprisingly friendly--a show-off, really.                                    Mr gobble 4-9-14

I hope that's getting you excited for the new season!  

-Carrie