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Bone Dry Down on the Farm – Just ask the dogs

We Think the Tractor's Sexy!


Clagett Farm Recipes~ We Think the Tractor's Sexy!
Photos and Recipes~Rita Calvert 2007

Farm Talk
...just couldn't resist that darlin' tractor who works so hard! (Have you heard the song?)

Don't forget to check out same time LAST YEAR for some great (and different) recipes on the same harvest from 2006.

Rockfish with Fresh Tomato Relish
Serves 4

4 rockfish fillets (6 ounces each)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 large chopped tomato
1/3 cup sliced pimento-stuffed olives
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
1 tablespoon drained capers
Prepare grill or heat oven to 450 degrees F. Tear 4 large sheets of aluminum foil. Put each fillet on one half of each sheet. Brush 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and the lemon juice evenly over fillets; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Fold half the foil over each fish fillet to make 4 rectangular packets. Fold the remaining 3 edges over several times to seal.

For relish, mix together the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, tomatoes, olives, basil and capers; set aside.

Place packets on grill over medium –hot coals or on a baking sheet in the oven. Grill, covered, or bake 6 to 10 minutes, or until fish is opaque in center. Carefully open packets; transfer to plates and top with relish.

Raw Tomato & Herb Salad Dressing
Yield: about 2/3 cup

1 ripe medium tomato
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon fresh tarragon
1 tablespoon fresh basil
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
Dash of cayenne pepper
In a blender, mix these ingredients until smooth and creamy.

Pasta with Zucchini, Lemon, Pine Nuts, and Herbs
Serves 4

Although penne is called for here, feel free to choose your favorite.

1/2 cup mixed fresh herbs: Italian parsley, marjoram, basil, chervil, hyssop, oregano, lemon thyme and others. (No tarragon for this dish) 
1 lemon, zested FIRST and then squeezed for the juice
6 tablespoons virgin olive oil 
5 tablespoons pine nuts 
1/c cup cluster onions or scallions, thinly sliced then roughly chopped 
4 teaspoons tiny capers, rinsed in water 
3 tomatoes, cut into narrow strips
8 ounces small, firm green or golden zucchini
1 pound penne pasta 
salt and pepper 
freshly grated Parmesan

Slice the zucchini diagonally into pieces about the same thickness as the pasta (matchstick size, 1/8" or so). Line up the slices and cut them into narrow matchsticks. Each one will be tipped with green or gold.

Choose your fresh herbs from those suggested. Pull the leaves off the stems and chop them, but not too finely. Include any flowers, such as the purple flowers of the basil or pink thyme blossoms.

Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a small pan and add the pine nuts. Cook them until they begin to color; then add the onions or scallions. Cook the two together over medium low heat until the the pine nuts are brown. Transfer them to a wide bowl and add the rest of the oil, the capers, lemon peel, tomatoes and herbs. Season with salt, freshly ground black pepper and 1/2 teaspoon or so lemon juice to taste.

Add salt to the boiling water, drop in the zucchini and cook it about 1 minute. Scoop it out, drain and add it to the bowl with the other ingredients. Next, cook the pasta, scoop it out and add it to the bowl as well. Toss with a pair of tongs, so that the pasta is coated with the oil and herbs. Serve with the cheese.


Thyme-Braised Zucchini in Creme Fraiche 
Serves 4
Braising zucchini brings out their subtle, delicate flavor.

4 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 medium zucchini, about 1-1/4 lbs., trimmed and thinly sliced Salt and freshly ground black pepper Zest of one lemon and juice of ½ lemon
2 tablespoons finely minced fresh thyme
3/4 cup crème fraîche or sour cream

Melt butter over low heat in skillet. Add zucchini, salt, pepper, lemon juice and thyme. Cover skillet and braise over low heat for 6-8 minutes, or until just tender. Uncover skillet. Gently fold in crème fraîche and just heat through. Adjust seasoning and serve at once.


Clagett Exotic Okra
Serves 4

This makes use of many of the items for the current harvest. If you don’t consume it all at 1st seating it is absolutely delish the next day as a salad. Notice a mortar and pestle is used.

1 teaspoon coriander seeds, toasted until fragrant, then ground in a mortar and pestle
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 pound young tender okra, trimmed of stem
1/2 cup cluster onions (finely sliced)
2 medium tomatoes (chopped)
1/2 teaspoon dill seed
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced
Salt to taste

Put oil in a medium skillet and heat over medium high. When hot add the okra, onions and tomatoes. 
Saute until okra is tender-about 4-6 minutes. Lower heat and add the remaining ingredients. Toss just briefly-Do not cook long as you want the ginger and garlic to remain fiesty! Serve immediately.

Jazar wa Kusa (Zucchini and Carrots, a recipe from Egypt)
adapted from Mediterranean Vegetables by Clifford Wright 

2 large fat carrots, sliced diagonally about 1/4 inch thick (you can substitute baby carrots if your family haven’t already eaten them up as snacks) 
2 zucchini, ends trimmed, sliced diagonally about 1/4 inch thick 
1 teaspoon freshly ground cumin seeds 
salt and pepper to taste 
2 tablespoons olive oil

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

In a large bowl, toss the carrots and zucchini together with the cumin and seaon with S & P. 

Heat the oil in a large skillet over med-low heat and cook the carrots and zucchini until crisply and tender, 25 to 30 minutes, tossing frequently. Serve hot.

Curried Roasted Okra
Serves 6

1 pound fresh okra
curry powder of choice

Slice okra into half inch pieces.
place curry powder (or some other spice mixture you like) in a bowl stir okra pieces around until they are well dusted

Grease a shallow roasting pan and place prepared okra on it. Roast okra until tender and a little crisp.

Pickled Okra

5 pounds okra
8 cups vinegar
1 cup water
1/2 cup kosher salt
8 cloves garlic
8 or more dried or fresh chiles
lots of dill seed

Wash okra, leaving top cam and removing excess stem. Combine vinegar, waterand kosher salt. Bring to a boil. Drop okra into boiling mixture (and chilesif you're using fresh chiles) and bring to a rolling boil. Place in hot, pint-sized sterilized jars. Add one clove of garlic and, if you're using
dried instead of fresh chiles, one or more dried hot chiles (depending on how hot you want them) and the dill seed to each jar. Seal while hot. Let stand 8 - 10 weeks before serving.
Layered Baked Okra
Serves 2 generously

This dish doubles well using a 9x13 casserole dish, or can be make in smaller amounts in individual ramekins.

3/4 lb large okra, cut into 1/2" thick slices
1 large ripe tomato, peeled, cored, seeded and coarsely chopped
1 small onion, very thinly sliced
1/2 to whole jalapeno pepper (personal taste) seeded and minced
4 slices bacon, diced and fried until not quite crisp, drained
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp chopped fresh sage or 1/2 tsp dried
Splash (scant 3 oz) dry white wine
1/4 cup grated Local Monterey Jack, colby, or mild cheddar cheese
Preheat oven to 350. Generously butter a small casserole dish (9x9 is about right)
Layer half the okra in the casserole. Top with half the tomatoes and then half the onions. Sprinkle with half the jalapenos and top with half the bacon. Season vegetables well with salt, pepper and half the age. Repeat the layers, then pour the wine over all.
Cover the casserole with foil and bake until tender about 30 - 40 minutes.

Remove the foil and spread the cheese over the vegetable. Bake, uncovered, until cheese is melted and bubbling, about 10 minutes longer. Let stand a
few minutes before serving.


bobcat rentals

Yay, thanks for the recipes! I'm gonna start cooking again.



Recently I found 'baked okra' at my local farmers market. No seasionings other than salt. Stems still intact, whole, maintained their green color. Crunchy and delicious. I am an okra lover from way back, but THIS was so far my favorite way to eat eat okra. I've been sitting here going thru page after page searching for a recipe so I can learn how to get the same result. so far, no luck. I learned that these little treasures come from Modesto, California, bagged, just baked dry and salted. Any ideas out there?

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