Water Pollution Feed

Bay Money in Virginia Budget

Va.Capitol
Virginia is well on the way to approving critically needed funding for Chesapeake Bay restoration.

Late last week, Gov. Bob McDonnell released his proposed amendments to Virginia’s new two-year budget adopted earlier by the Virginia General Assembly. This was the next step in approving a budget that includes $87.6 million to help Virginia localities pay for upgrades to their sewage treatment plants, among the larger sources of pollution plaguing the Bay.

While the Assembly will have the last word on the governor’s amendments, it’s likely the Bay funding will remain intact. That’s very important for the Bay, local rivers, and local governments.

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While Building Market Sleeps, Some Counties Are Busy Encouraging Future Sprawl

SprawlThere may not be a lot of homes or businesses being built in the current real estate market, but there are major attempts to open farmland for developers when they’re ready.   

In Maryland at least, a new but untested state law might be the best defense against land speculators’ further incursion into the countryside.

A group of environmental groups and property owners filed a lawsuit Thursday, Dec. 8, against the county commissioners of Queen Anne’s County, Maryland, to stop the latest attempt by some local governments to pave over our rural landscape.

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Look to the Lafayette!

VIPs tossing oysters into River for web The health of the Chesapeake Bay is, depending upon various reports, unchanged, slightly better, or slightly worse. Regardless of the precise status, experts agree the Bay remains seriously out of balance and greatly compromised by pollution.

That’s why the new federal-state Bay restoration initiative is so important to implement.  The initiative puts the Bay on a pollution diet and directs the Bay states and localities to devise plans to stick to it. The diet will reduce pollution to levels the Bay can safely handle and still support all the crabs, fish, oysters -- and people -- who call the Bay home.  The goal is to implement all the plans in the next 15 years.

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