Acorn squash, and your first taste of fall salad greens

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This week's share

Garlic - 2 heads
Acorn Squash - 2
Sweet Peppers - 4
Tomatoes - 1 ripening, several green
Salad mix - 1 small bag
Basil - 1 large bag

Optional:
Okra
 - 1.5 pounds
Hot or mild chili medley -  6 ounces
Eggplant - 2.5 pounds

*numbers vary depending on the size of the vegetables,
 everyone gets about the same weights
 


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The varieties in your salad mix, clockwise from bottom left: Red Russian Kale, Tokyo Bekana Mustard, Astro Arugula, Mizuna Mustard, Red Mustard, Tat soi.  Later, you might have a choice of some of these varieties alone, so this is your chance to try them all.
 

Next coming weeks... 

While things like the tomatoes have faded away, this weather has made room for the fall crops.  You'll get a tiny amount of salad greens this week just as a start.  Soon we'll also have kale and collards.  We expect to keep harvesting eggplant, sweet peppers, and okra until October.  And of course, you'll get garlic until the end!

As mentioned last week in the email we will be starting our sweet potato harvest in about a month and right now the field looks great!  In the meantime, we're giving out winter squash--you'll see us cycle through a number of different delicious varieties over the weeks to come.  
 

Reminders... 

Garlic for sale in bulk

Only $8 per pound for CSA members

(We'll be charging $12 per pound to non-CSA members once we know our CSA members have had their fill.)  

*Cash or check (made out to CBF), or purchase on-line HERE. This link is for CSA members only.

Note that streaks and spots of purple, black and brown are normal, natural colors to see on our garlic.  

Curious what the Chesapeake Bay Foundation is up to? 

There's a lot!  Here's just a few highlights:

  • We just sued the EPA for failing to hold Pennsylvania accountable.  
  • Your farm just got a cameo in a snazzy video 
  • The education program has begun live on-line classes for students that are incredibly engaging, in spite of being confined to your computer screen.  

U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link here: U-PICK SIGN UP

The following are available for u-pick:

  • Okra (field B2)- This field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter the farm you will keep right at the first fork to go towards the main office.  You may park near the garage area and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind the garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4, but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant.  Please wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Flowers - You can pick any flowers you see on the farm.  There are still zinnias in field D in the middle.  The sunflowers in field G2 have matured into seed, which you can feed your wild birds or save to plant next year.  
  • Herbs -  Everything on this list is behind the washing station.  If you desire more Genovese Basil (the one traditionally used for pesto), it will be located down near the zinnias in field D (the big field you pass on your right as you're driving into the farm).
    • Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    • Cutting celery
    • Garlic Chives (with edible flowers)
    • Lemon Balm (looking especially lush right now
    • Lemongrass
    • Lemon Verbena
    • Marjoram
    • Onion Chives
    • Oregano
    • Sage
    • Shiso
    • Sorrel
    • Spearmint
    • Sweet potato greens
    • Thyme

 

Recipes 

Blistered Shishito Peppers

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  • Prep time: 3 minutes
  • Cook time: 6 minutes
  • Yield: serves 2-4

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 20 or so shishito peppers (about 4 or 5 ounces, 1 small basket)
  • Sprinkle of kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (optional)

METHOD

1 Toss peppers with oil: Toss shishito peppers with extra virgin olive oil in a bowl, so the peppers are well coated.

2 Sear in frying pan: Heat a well seasoned cast iron (or a pan that can take high heat) on high heat. When the pan is hot, add the peppers to the pan in a single layer. Let the peppers sear and blister on one side, then use tongs to turn them over individually to sear on the other side.

3 Salt: Remove to a bowl and sprinkle the shishito peppers with salt.

4 Make balsamic glaze (Optional):  Add a couple tablespoons of balsamic vinegar* to the pan. Remove from heat, and let bubble until the vinegar reduces to a glaze, which should be very quickly. Pour over the blistered shishito peppers.

*Balsamic vinegar can be syrupy and sweet, or thin and acidic. Use the syrupy kind. If what you have is thin and very acidic, stir with a half teaspoon of sugar or honey before adding to the hot pan.

Baked Acorn Squash with Butter and Brown Sugar

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Easy baked acorn squash recipe, perfect for the fall. Squash is cut in half, insides scooped out, then baked with a little butter, brown sugar, and maple syrup.

  • Prep time: 10 minutes
  • Cook time: 1 hour, 15 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 2 to 4, depending on how much squash you like to eat.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 Acorn squash
  • 1 Tbsp Butter
  • 2 Tbsp Brown Sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Maple Syrup
  • Dash of Salt

METHOD

1 Preheat your oven to 400°F (205°C).

2 Prep the squash: If you have a microwave, microwave the squash for a minute each, to make it easier to cut. Stabilize the squash on a cutting board as best you can, stem end down if the stem is short enough, otherwise on the side. Using a sharp, sturdy chef's knife, carefully cut the acorn squash in half, from tip to stem. If on its side, the squash can rock back and forth, so take care as you are cutting it.

Use a sturdy metal spoon to scrape out the seeds and stringy bits inside each squash half, until the inside is smooth.

Take a sharp paring knife and score the insides of the acorn squash halves in a cross-hatch pattern, about a half-inch deep cuts.

Place the squash halves cut side up in a roasting pan. Pour 1/4-inch of water over the bottom of the pan so that the squash doesn't burn or get dried out in the oven.

3 Add butter, salt, brown sugar, maple syrup: Rub a half tablespoon of butter into the insides of each half. Sprinkle with a little salt if you are using unsalted butter.

Crumble a tablespoon of brown sugar into the center of each half and drizzle with a teaspoon of maple syrup.

4 Bake: Bake at 400°F (205°C) for about an hour to an hour 15 minutes, until the tops of the squash halves are nicely browned, and the squash flesh is very soft and cooked through.

It's hard to overcook squash, it just gets better with more caramelization. But don't undercook it.

5 Remove from oven, spoon brown sugar butter sauce over squash: When done, remove the squash halves from the oven and let them cool for a bit before serving.

Spoon any buttery sugar sauce that has not already been absorbed by the squash over the exposed areas.



Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Feeling like Fall

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This week's share

Garlic - 2 heads
Small Pie Pumpkin - 1
Sweet Peppers - 6 to 8
Eggplant - 2 to 3 
Tomatoes - 1.25 pounds

Optional:
Okra
- 1.5 pounds
Hot or mild chili medley -  6 ounces

*numbers vary depending on the size of the vegetables,
 everyone gets about the same weights
 



 

Updates

  • Garlic for sale in bulk

Only $8 per pound for CSA members
(We'll be charging $12 per pound to non-CSA members once we know our CSA members have had their fill.)  
*Cash or check (made out to CBF), or purchase on-line HERE. This link is for CSA members only.
Note that purple, black and brown are normal, natural colors to see on our garlic.  

  • Photographed above are some members of our crew (from left: Matt, Jared and Ronnie) taking back some of the flower and herb garden behind the wash station from all the weeds this past Saturday.  Thanks guys!
  • Remember when we forecast an early demise of the tomatoes and winter squash due to the frequent rains we had in June, July and August?  We had 10 rain events in August for a total of 16 inches, which is a lot!  The tomatoes gave us a bumper crop in their short lives, but alas, they've petered out prematurely.  And yet!  The winter squash looks amazing!  This week you're getting a little pie pumpkin, which is both ornamental and edible.  In the coming weeks, you should see some butternuts, acorns and more.  We're relieved and delighted.  And speaking of fall crops to come, the sweet potato crop also looks healthy and abundant.  We expect to start digging them in about a month, and they need a week to cure.  
  • One of our members asked why we sell the garlic to you instead of including it all in your shares.  Garlic is a high-value per pound item that stores well and lends itself to keeping some on hand to sell.  It's also a crop that grows relatively easily for us, and we usually have more than most of our members want.  It makes sense to give a moderate amount of garlic to all of you, and then sell the rest.  That way we can make some additional revenue to help cover the cost of the tens of thousands of pounds of produce that we donate.  This year, more than ever, we're having to grow more and spend more time packaging your shares, without charging more to you, our members.  And consider, also, that you're getting a deep discount on garlic if you decide to purchase some extra.  Thanks!  

U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link below 
U-PICK SIGN UP


Please still note there is NO u-pick of tomatoes and chilies.  Those plants have slowed down production.

The following are available for u-pick:

  • Okra (field B2)- This field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter the farm you will keep right at the first fork to go towards the main office.  You may park near the garage area and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind the garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4, but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant.  Please wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Flowers - You can pick any flowers you see on the farm, including the Sunflowers in field G2.  
  • Herbs -  Everything on this list is behind the washing station.  If you desire more Genovese Basil (the one traditionally used for pesto), it will be located down near the zinnias in field D (the big field you pass on your right as you're driving into the farm).
    • Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    • Cutting celery
    • Garlic Chives (with edible flowers)
    • Lemon Balm (looking especially lush right now
    • Lemon Verbena
    • Marjoram
    • Onion Chives
    • Oregano
    • Sage
    • Shiso
    • Sorrel
    • Spearmint
    • Summer Savory
    • Thyme
    • New - We have a small patch of sweet potatoes in the herb garden which you may cut for their delicious greens.

 

Recipes

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GRILLED EGGPLANT CAPRESE

Grilled eggplant caprese features perfectly grilled eggplant, juicy summer tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and basil. It’s an easy, healthy and delicious summer dish perfect for using seasonal eggplant! (gluten-free, vegetarian, nut-free)

 

Ingredients

  • 1 small eggplant, cut horizontally into 1/2” slices
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Coarse sea salt
  • freshly cracked black pepper

Instructions

  • Slice eggplant, tomato and mozzarella into 1/2″ rounds using a sharp knife.
  • Heat a grill or grill pan to medium high heat.
  • Brush eggplant with oil on both sides and sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper.
  • Grill eggplant for 3-4 minutes per side. Remove from grill.
  • Arrange eggplant on a platter, alternating with tomato and mozzarella slices.
  • Drizzle with balsamic reduction or balsamic vinegar. Sprinkle with basil and serve.

Notes

  • Don’t be afraid to oil and season the eggplant well! This will bring out the best flavor and texture.
  • Serve warm, cold, or room temperature. Anything goes!
  • Serve with toasted sourdough bread for a truly delicious meal, appetizer, or side.
  • Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge
  • 2 medium ripe tomatoes, cut into 1/2” slices
  • 8 oz fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced into 1/2” slices
  • Fresh basil leaves, roughly torn
  • Balsamic reduction, or balsamic vinegar


     

Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Where did August go?

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This week's share

Garlic - 1 

Sweet Peppers - 8 to 10
Eggplant - 1 to 3
Squash - 1 or 2 
Tomatoes - 4
Okra - 1 pound
(numbers vary depending on the size of the vegetables so everyone gets about the same weights)
Choice of hot chili medley, mild chili medley, garlic chives or tulsi basil
 

Updates

This week we will be starting to offer garlic for sale in bulk
Only $8 per pound for CSA members
(We'll be charging $12 per pound to non-CSA members once we know our CSA members have had their fill.)  Sorry, we misstated the price last week!  
*Cash or check (made out to CBF).  We'll have on-line payment for garlic set up soon.*
Note that it is normal for our garlic to have streaks of purple, black and brown.  We're not sure why garlic in the store is so much whiter--we attribute it to the varieties we grow and our natural process of curing.

There is NO u-pick of tomatoes and chilies.  Those plants have slowed down production.

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This adorable skink caught Carrie's attention as she was photographing your chilies.  These native lizards are beneficial--they don't bite, and they eat insects.  Thanks, skinks!
The chilies in the photo at the top of this e-mail are arranged in order of heat, from least hot on the left to most hot on the right: Mellow Star Shishito, Bastan Poblano, Highlander Anaheim, Red Ember Cayenne, Aji Chinchi Amarillo, El Jefe Jalapeno, Hot Rod Serrano, and Hot Paper Lantern Habanero.  All of them ripen red except the yellow one, so the ones in your bag might be red (ripe) or green (unripe).  Both are hot, but the ripe ones might be hotter. 


U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link below 

U-PICK SIGN UP


The following are available for u-pick:

  •  Okra (field B2)- This field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter farm you will keep right at the first fork to go towards the main office.  You may park near the garage area and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4 but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Flowers - You can pick any flowers you see on the farm, but in particular, the Sunflowers are blooming nicely (those are located in field G2, which is just past the washing station, where you pick up your share).  
  • Herbs -  Everything on this list is behind the washing station.  If you desire more Genovese Basil (the one traditionally used for pesto), it will be located down near the zinnias in field D (the big field you pass on your right as you're driving into the farm).
    Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    Garlic Chives (with edible flowers)
    Lemon Balm (looking especially lush right now
    Lemon Verbena
    Marjoram
    Onion Chives
    Oregano
    Sage
    Shiso
    Sorrel
    Spearmint
    Summer Savory
    Thyme

 

Recipes

Roasted Pasta in a Dutch Oven

  • One of your fellow members, Maria Foscarinis, recommended putting bow tie pasta into an oven-safe pot with the raw tomatoes and other ingredients of pasta sauce (chopped vegetables, garlic, onion, herbs) and roasting the mix in a hot oven until the sauce and pasta are cooked to your liking.  Roasting the tomatoes intensifies the flavor and caramelizes some of the sugars, and there's no need to boil the pasta separately.

Stuffed Sweet Peppers

  • Long grain white rice – leftover rice works great if you have some.
  • Sweet Peppers- bell-shaped I cut tops off, others are halved 
  • Olive oil – only a little is needed for sauteing. 
  • Ground beef (optional of course can always sub in extra veggies!)
  • Yellow onion and fresh garlic 
  • Tomato sauce 
  • Parsley, Oregano  
  • Mozzarella cheese 

How to Make

Precook peppers so they are soft

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cook rice according to package instructions.
  • Meanwhile, trim about 1/4-inch from tops of bell peppers and halve smaller peppers, Then remove stems, ribs and seeds.
  • Fill a baking dish just large enough to fit peppers with about 1/2-inch of water then place peppers upside down in water, cover tightly with foil and bake 20 minutes.

    Making the filling
  • Meanwhile heat olive oil in a large non-stick skillet over-medium high heat. Add onion and saute 3 minutes.
  •  Move onions to one far side of the skillet. Add beef in chunks, season with salt and pepper then let sear until browned on bottom, about 2 – 3 minutes.
  • Break up beef and toss with onions and continue to cook 2 minutes, add garlic and cook until beef is cooked through about 1 minute longer.
  • Remove from heat! 
  • Stir in tomatoes, half of the tomato sauce (about 1/2 cup) save some to drizzle on at the end , cooked rice, parsley, Italian seasoning and season with salt and pepper to taste.

    Mix it all together
  • Reduce oven temperature to 350. Turn par-baked peppers upright and fill with beef filling.
  • Pour remaining tomato sauce over peppers. Cover with foil and continue to bake 20 minutes.
  • Remove from oven, sprinkle with cheese, return to oven and bake until peppers have reached desired tenderness, about 10 – 20 minutes (thinner peppers will be done near lesser time thicker near greater). Sprinkle with parsley and serve warm. Enjoy! 




Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Summer bounty continues

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These are some wonderful students (and very hard-working, patient parents) from Key School and Broadneck High School, picking okra for the Saturday share and for donation to SHABACH.  They have been helping us harvest each Friday since early July, sometimes bringing helpers from Broadneck High School.  We're especially appreciative of their work because they come every week, and work independently without a great deal of instruction.  Thank you!  Photo by V. Robbins.

 

This week's share

Garlic - 1 head
Onions - 1/4 pound
Sweet Peppers - several each of green, red and orange
Eggplants - 2-3
Squash - 1-2
Tomatoes - about 4 pounds

Optional:  a small bag each of hot chili peppers and okra, for those of you who like them.

  Next week we will be starting to offer garlic for sale in bulk
Only $5 per pound for CSA members
*Cash only and we ask for everyone purchasing to use exact change.  We will provide a dropbox for contactless payment*

 

U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link below 

U-PICK SIGN UP!!!

Everything is the same except we've removed chili peppers from u-pick--due to popularity the plants have asked for a break in order to keep growing peppers!

Tomatoes (field F) - all of the tomato varieties, IMPORTANT- these are not all tied up so be very careful where you step so as to not break plants or crush any good tomatoes!
Going down the field varieties include:
      Sun golds, orange cherry tomatoes 
      Sunrise bumble bee, larger striped cherry tomatoes 
     Garden peach, small, yellow, fuzzy with blushes of pink when ripe  
     Green Zebra, yellow/green with green stripes 
      Verona, red plum
      Roma, red oblong  
      New Girl, red slicing tomato

  •  Okra (field B2)- this field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter the farm you will keep right to go towards main office.  You may park near the garage/shed beside the other vehicles, and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4 but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Any Flowers you see on the farm, but in particular, the Sunflowers are blooming nicely ( those are located next to the large parking lot on the same side of the driveway as the washing station). Some Zinnias could probably still be found (in the large field that is passed on your right on the way into the farm across from the 3 barns, in field "D")  
  •  Herbs (which for the most part are located behind the washing station, if you desire more "Regular" Basil it will be located down in field D near the zinnias)

    Basils (Genovese "Regular", Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    Garlic Chives (now with edible flowers)
    Lemon Balm
    Lemon Verbena
    Marjoram
    Onion Chives
    Oregano

    Sage
    Shiso
    Sorrel
    Spearmint
    Summer Savory
    Thyme

     

Recipes 

Roasted Eggplant and Chickpea Stew
Good way to use up eggplant, peppers, and tomatoes!

Yield: About 6 servings
 

Ingredients:
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds  potatoes
2 large peppers
vegetable oil
1 cup packed basil leaves
1 cup packed cilantro leaves
3 large garlic cloves
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon roasted ground cumin
2 large onions, peeled and cut into eighths
1 pound eggplant, cut into long strips
2-3 large tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and diced
1 1/2 cups cooked chickpeas (1 can, rinsed)

Procedure:

  • Preheat the broiler. Bring 6 cups water to boil and add 1 teaspoon salt. Slice the potatoes lengthwise about 1/2 inch thick, boil them for 5 mintues, and drain. Halve the peppers lenthwise, press to flatten them, then brush with vegetable oil. Broil, cut side down, on a baking sheet until blistered but not charred. Stack them on top of one another and set aside to steam. When cool, remove the skins and cut the pieces in half. Set the oven temperature at 350 F.
  • Coarsely chop the basil, cilantro, and garlic, then puree in a small food processor with the olive oil, cumin, and 1/2 teaspoon salt.
  • Toss all the vegetables with 1 teaspoon salt, some freshly ground pepper, and the herb mixture. Using your hands, rub the herb mixture into the vegetables, especially the eggplant, then add the chickpeas and toss once more. Transfer everything to an earthenware gratin dish or a casserole dish . Rinse out the herb container with 1/2 cup water and pour it over all. Cover the gratin dish tightly with foil and bake until tender, about 1 1/2 hours. Remove the foil, brush the exposed vegetables with the juices, and bake for 20 minutes more. Let cool for at least 10 minutes before serving.
  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. On a rimmed baking sheet, spread bread in a single layer and bake until dry and golden brown, about 20 minutes.

    Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine tomatoes, onion, vinegar, and oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add toasted bread and basil, toss to combine. Let sit 20 - 30 minutes to allow bread to soak up liquid. Top with dollops of ricotta and finish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.
     

Fried or Baked Okra 

Still weary of slimy okra? If you haven't tried them breaded and fried/baked then you should definitely give this a try as it is a delicious side dish!
 

Ingredients 

10 pods okra, sliced in 1/4 inch pieces
1 egg, beaten
1 cup cornmeal
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
½ cup vegetable oil ( if frying ons stove top)

Procedure:
For breading I typically toss the okra into the dry mix of cornmeal plus seasonings, then dip into eggwash, then back into cornmeal mixture. Once they are breaded you have the choice to fry them up in oil on the stove top or Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. On a rimmed baking sheet, spread bread in a single layer and bake until dry and golden brown, about 20 minutes. Also heard they were pretty tasty air fried too....

Meanwhile,if you want to spruce them up, in a large bowl, combine tomatoes, onion, vinegar, and an extra drizzle of oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add toasted bread and basil, toss to combine. Let sit 20 - 30 minutes to allow bread to soak up liquid. Top with dollops of ricotta and finish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.



Let us know if you give them try and if you are doing anything exciting with your summer bounty so far this year! 



Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Week 14: Rain, Rain, Go Away!

 

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This week's Share

Garlic, 1 head
Onions, ~ 1/2 pound
Shallots, ~ 1/2 pound
Eggplant, 1.5 pounds
Sweet Peppers, 4 mix of ripe (red & orange) and unripe (green)
Tomatoes, so many!
Squash, 1
Choose: 1.5 lbs okra or 0.5 lb hot chili peppers
 

U-Pick 

Continue to sign up for a slot through link below! 

                            U-Pick SIGN UP!!!!                             


Newly added!!! 

  • Tomatoes (field F) - all of the larger tomato varieties below the cherries are up for grabs, IMPORTANT- these are not tied up so be very careful where you step so as to not break plants or crush any good tomatoes!! 
    Going down the field varieties include:
                      Garden peach, small, yellow, fuzzy with blushes of pnk when ripe
                      Verona,red roma/plum
                      Roma, red larger plum shaped  
                      New Girl, red slicing tomato
  • Chili Peppers (field F)- much easier to find as they are in same field as the cherry tomatoes across from wash station/ pick up location, they will be closer to the greenhouse. VERY IMPORTANT- Please Please Please use pruners to harvest these as they are very fragile plants!!! 

     
  • Okra (field B2)- this field is way out there, and  you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter farm you will stay straight to go towards main office.  You may park near the garage/ shed area as to not block driveway, and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind garage/shed. 
           As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4 but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)


U-Pick Items Continuing on....

  • Cherry Tomatoes and a few of the Sunrise Bumblebee ( Located in the fenced in field across from washing station in field "F" in the first 2 rows - Again be careful in areas not tied up!!
  • Any Flowers you see on the farm , but in particular, the Sunflowers are blooming nicely ( those are located next to the large parking lot used for u-picking that is in field "G2") Some Zinnias could probably still be found ( in the large field that is passed on your right on the way into the farm across from the 3 barns, in field "D")  
  •  Herbs ( which for the most part are located behind the washing station, if you desire more "Regular" Basil it will be located down in field D nearby the zinnias)

    Basils (Genovese "Regular", Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon"Fancy")
    Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    Garlic Chives
    Lemon Balm
    Lemon Verbena
    Marjoram
    Onion Chives
    Oregano
    Parsley 
    (these are starting to flower and aren't producing many leaves)
    Sage
    Shiso
    Sorrel
    Spearmint
    Summer Savory
    Thyme


  

Announcements 

  • Too much rain dancing!!!! As much as the weather as been our friend this year, we are finally starting to deal with TOO MUCH rain. Plants generally thrive in periods of moderate dry and wet. The past couple of weeks have left us in quite a period of wet. 

    This weather causes some trouble for tomatoes and winter squash as they do not like having wet leaves. Sadly that's the way of farming, but let's enjoy what mother nature has already given us this harvest season so far!!! 

Other Info 

  • Remember NOW is the time to request your absentee ballot if you are a Maryland resident!
  • We continue to place bruised, misshapen and damaged but usable vegetables on a cart near our compost pile.  Help yourselves!  You may also add your own compost to that nearby pile.
  • We've just past the halfway point of your CSA season.  If you are a 26-week member and have missed shares, consider doubling them now while we have plenty.  
  • Need another easy way to use those 6 pounds of tomatoes before they go bad?  Wash them, cut out the stems, and drop them into a crockpot on low.  Leave them to simmer for a long, long time (overnight works).  Now that it's sauce, zip it with an immersion blender to break up the skins (or feed it through a food mill to remove the skins).  Then put the sauce in jars or bags and, once they're cooled, put them in the freezer.  Easy!  

Hoping for sunnier days ahead!! 

Thanks so much for being our members,

The Clagett Farm Team
 


Week 13: Our sweet peppers are ripe and the Asian pears are ready!!

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This week's share

Garlic, 1 head
Onions, a few
Shallots, a few
Asian Pears, 2 small 
Eggplant, 1-2

Sweet Peppers, 4 including green (unripe) and red & orange (sweet ripe)

Tomatoes, so so many
Choose: 1.5 lbs okra or 6 oz hot chili peppers

Announcements

U-Picking Shall Continue!! 
WE DO want you to continue signing up to u-pick.  Please still come as much as you would like. There's 10 spots open per hour, so we have yet to fill up at any point--you can u-pick any daylight hour, all week. Just sign up through the link below

https://www.signupgenius.com/go/5080c4badaf2ca7fd0-upick


Whats on U-Pick! 

  • Cherry Tomatoes and a few of the Sunrise Bumblebee ( Located in the fenced in field across from washing station in field "F" in the first 2 rows -Please try to stay in the tomatoes only.  Chilies are not on u-pick yet.)
  • Any Flowers you see on the farm , but in particular, the Sunflowers are blooming nicely ( those are located next to the large parking lot used for u-picking that is in field "G2") Some Zinnias could probably still be found ( in the large field that is passed on your right on the way into the farm across from the 3 barns, in field "D")
  •  Herbs ( which for the most part are located behind the washing station, if you desire more "Regular" Basil it will be located down in field D nearby the zinnias)

    Basils (Genovese "Regular", Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon"Fancy")
    Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    Garlic Chives
    Lemon Balm
    Lemon Verbena
    Marjoram
    Onion Chives
    Oregano
    Parsley
    (these are starting to flower and won’t last much longer)
    Sage
    Shiso
    Sorrel
    Spearmint
    Summer Savory
    Thyme


     
  • We are accepting volunteers again but only for field work where it is easy to keep people socially distanced. Please let us know if you or someone you know may be interested. We do offer a work exchange program             ( 5 hours of work = 1 CSA share). 

     
  • Again, We are trying to use biodegradable and inexpensive packaging whenever possible, and when we add vegetables with condensation from the cooler or moisture from washing, the paper products don't always hold up as well as we'd like. The whole team is also are learning new things each week as it comes to packaging and will keep improving how items (particularly the tomatoes) are packed. Thank you for your patience everyone! It will still be handy to have an extra tote bag for extra support when carrying tomatoes home! 
  • And, please welcome Matt Pombuena ( photographed above harvesting the asian pears!) to the farm team. He just completed his first two weeks and already has been a tremendous help getting all these vegetables harvested!!!!

Recipes

With all the tomatoes from your shares and the additional ones from the cull bins we have available now is the time of year to make all that salsa and tomato sauce. Here is a recipe that can help utilize as many of those plentiful veggies in your shares!                                  
Salsa (spicy optional) - Quick and easy recipe! 
Makes about 4 pints  
3 pounds of tomatoes
3-4 onions depends on size
1 cup of white vinegar
1/4 cup of fresh cilantro
1/4 cup of Lemon juice
2 Garlic cloves minced
2 teaspoons of cumin
1/2 table spoon of salt 
1 teaspoon of dried oregano
1 Chili of desired heat level jalapeno or serrano are popular ( optional)

Directions 

  1. Finely chop tomatoes, onions, and cilantro
    2.  Add in Garlic , Lemon juice, Vinegar, and all dry seasonings (Cumin, salt, and oregano)
  2. Gently mix the bowl together and from there you can choose to add in a chili or not 
    4. ENJOY!
        You may get a little more complicated and take time to peel tomatoes and also cook down the salsa on the stove top in order to prep for canning  (read below)       
       1. In a Dutch oven or something similar, bring 1 quarts water to a boil. Using a slotted spoon, place tomatoes, a few at a time, in boiling water for 30-60 seconds. Remove each tomato and immediately plunge into ice water. Drain and pat dry. Peel and finely chop tomatoes to measure about 5 cups; place in a stockpot.
      2. Stir in remaining ingredients. Add water to cover; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, until slightly thickened, about 30 minutes
    3. Ladle hot mixture into hot 1-pint jars, leaving 1/2-in. headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot mixture. Wipe rims. Center lids on jars; screw on bands until fingertip tight.
    4. Place jars into canner with simmering water, ensuring that they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil; process for 15 minutes. Remove jars and cool.
                        
  • Your fellow member, Dale Rubenstein, shared a recipe also of a cold soup they made with some of the stuff made from previous shares that we wanted to pass along in case you have any of this still hanging around. 
    All it takes is a blender:
    Korean melon
    Cucumber
    Yogurt or pick non-dairy milk
    Scallion or shallot
    Salt/Pepper
    Mince herb when serve (we have basil)


More Info 

Until now, your weekly emails have been authored by Carrie Vaughn.  You've seen Carrie's face every week if you pick up your share in DC.  This week is the first from another member of the team, Elissa Planz.  You've met Elissa if you pick up at the farm or in Annapolis.  

Thanks so much for being our members,
Elissa and the rest of the Clagett Farm Team


Week 12: Summer bounty!

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Dave Vernon snapped this photo just a few hours ago of Carole and Vince (the volunteers in hats) and Jared and Elissa picking up tomatoes.  We don't always have piles of vegetables at the ends of the fields--just these moments of overwhelming abundance.  A good problem to have!    
And speaking of overabundance, we got 4.5 inches of rain yesterday.  That's quite a storm--enough to get our truck stuck in the mud while we were trying to harvest your eggplant yesterday.  While I don't normally want so much rain at once, we're glad for the soak.  We needed it! And this was the first time I harvested in a bathing suit and rain boots.  
 

Announcements

  • Reject Vegetables and Compost:  With ripe tomatoes come bruised tomatoes.  And sweet peppers with bug holes.  And eggplants with soft spots.  And overgrown okra.  In years past we have had a bin (and sometimes many bins) of reject vegetables available as a bonus to your share.  Lately, we've been tossing those rejects in the compost.  This week we're going to experiment with leaving the rejects near the compost pile.  Which means two things: (1) We are now giving you permission to add your compost to our compost pile.  And (2) you may now pause (briefly!) on your way out of the farm to take any rejects you might like from the area we have designated near the pile.  The quicker you can act the better--if we have a traffic jam near the compost pile this experiment will meet a speedy end.  The compost pile is behind the garage that sits opposite the washing station.  Please only add plant products to the compost pile.  We do not want your biodegradable bags and plates and so forth--they quickly become litter.  Also, RIGHT NOW, while you're thinking of it, put a container in your car for those bruised tomatoes.  Also, please wear masks when you're on the farm outside your vehicle around the food.  This includes dropping compost, picking up reject vegetables, and u-picking.  Thanks!
  • This is a good time to revisit the idea of putting up vegetables for the winter.  Think about the things you'll be missing in December, and how you can put up any extras you have now.  Tomatoes can be frozen whole (seriously--just put the whole tomato in a bag in the freezer), or frozen as sauce or soup.  Or they can be dehydrated, or canned.  You can chop up peppers and freeze them.  Last year I was impressed by all the ways people put up their chilies!  Let this be the summer you learn how to give your winter self the gift of this summer's bounty.  It's a lot quicker and easier than your think.    
  • A few of you have noticed that the paper bags that hold your CSA shares are not always strong enough to carry the CSA share without ripping.  We are trying to use biodegradable and inexpensive packaging whenever possible, and when we add vegetables with condensation from the cooler or moisture from washing, the paper products don't always hold up as well as we'd like.  Please keep a tote bag or cardboard box handy for carrying your CSA share once it leaves our hands.  Thanks so much!  

This week's share

  • 2 ears sweet corn
  • 1 head garlic
  • 1 pound potatoes
  • 1 pound yellow onions + red shallots
  • 7 pounds tomatoes
  • 2 green bell peppers
  • 1-3 eggplants (depending on size)
  • Choose one (your pick-up might not have all 4 of these options):
    • 1 pound okra, or
    • 1 pint green chilies (probably shishitos, or possibly jalapenos, cayenne or serranos), or
    • 1 pint tomatillos, or
    • 1 pint roma tomatoes 

U-Pick

  • Cherry tomatoes - We Sun Golds (orange) and a few Sunrise Bumblebee (orange-yellow with red stripes) in a couple rows at the top of "F" field, which is inside the deer fence across the driveway from the washing station
  • Flowers - Any flowers you see on the farm are open to u-pick.  We have flowers behind the washing station, sunflowers in field "G2" which is beside the parking area on the same side of the driveway as the washing station, and zinnias in field "D", which is in front of the barns on your right side as you're driving in.
  • Herbs - mostly in the herb gardens behind the washing station, as well as some basil and parsley in field D: 
    • Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    • Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    • Garlic Chives
    • Lemon Balm
    • Lemon Verbena
    • Marjoram
    • Onion Chives
    • Oregano
    • Parsley (these are starting to flower and won’t last much longer)
    • Sage
    • Shiso
    • Sorrel
    • Spearmint
    • Summer Savory
    • Thyme

Recipe

Vegetable Hash with Eggs, by Brandy Shannon

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1 1/4 Pound Potatoes, scrubbed and diced 1/2" 
  • Kosher Salt & Fresh Ground Pepper
  • 1 Chopped Onion
  • 1 Chopped Green Pepper 
  • 3 Minced Garlic Clove
  • 1 Minced Chili - If you like it spicy, mince whole. If you like it mild, remove seeds and white membrane before mincing.
  • 4 Eggs
  • 3 Tablespoon Crumbled Goat Cheese
  • 1 Tablespoon Chopped Cilantro or other green herb of your choice

Directions
Heat oven to 400 degrees.
Heat Olive Oil over med-high in 12" Ovenproof Skillet
Add Potatoes in a single, even layer to the skillet, season with salt and pepper.
Cook, tossing occasionally and scrape the bottom of the pan until browned, about 10 minutes.
Lower heat to medium, add onion and cook until translucent, about 5 minutes. If the pan is dry, add a bit more olive oil to prevent too much sticking.
Add to the skillet: Garlic, Bell Pepper,Chili and a 1/2 Teaspoon of salt and pepper.
Cook, tossing occasionally until pepper and potatoes are tender, about 5 minutes.

Remove the skillet from heat and scrape any stuck bits off the bottom of the pan. You can use a tablespoon of lemon juice, stock, or water to deglaze the pan if desired.

Use a spoon to make 4 small craters in the hash.
Crack an egg into each crater.
Season the eggs with salt and pepper
Bake for 5-7 minutes until egg whites are set and remove skillet from the oven.

Sprinkle goat cheese and cilantro over top of the hash and eggs.
Serve hot. 

Great topping options: lemon wedges, salt, pepper, hot sauce, more goat cheese, more cilantro
 


Coming Soon

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  • Many people do not realize that the green bell peppers at the supermarket are unripe.  Had they been left to ripen on the plant, they would become the sweeter, yellow, orange and red bell peppers that cost a little more money.  So far we've been giving you green bell peppers from 2 of our 5 varieties, and letting the rest ripen to their full sweet glory.  The plants are LOADED and you're going to see a lot of sweet, ripe peppers soon.  We have 5 varieties of peppers this year that you can generally classify as sweet (not hot) peppers.  The first two are the ones that we pick green, since they size up quickly.  The other 3 are smaller, which means they ripen quickly, which is why we use them as our sweeter, ripe peppers.  Don't be confused by their pointy shape--none of these peppers is spicy:   
    • Flavorburst - bell shape, starts green-yellow and ripens to orange
    • Jupiter - bell shape, dark green and ripens to red
    • Glow - ranges from elongated bell shape to pointy, dark green and ripens to orange 
    • Cornito Rosso - pointed shape, green ripens to red
    • Oranos - pointed shape, green ripens to orange
  • Tomatoes, eggplant, chilies and okra also continue to increase in abundance
  • Asian pears next week
  • This is the last week of potatoes
  • We will have several more weeks of onions and shallots.  And of course, garlic every week through November.  
  • Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday members will get the same amount of corn in total over the next two weeks, but my guess is that Wednesday and Thursday members will get a little corn this week and next while Saturday members will get all of their ears this week.  This will probably be the last corn of the season.  
  • Squash will come back in about 2 weeks

Can you feel the days getting shorter already?  Enjoy this summer sun while it lasts--it will be gone before you know it!


Thanks so much for being our members,
Carrie Vaughn and rest of the Clagett farmers


Week 11: Tomatoes are here!

 

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Week 13: Tomatoes!

These little gems, above, are sun gold cherry tomatoes.  They are the sweetest tomatoes we grow, and we can't imagine summer without them.  

Announcements

  • We are opening the flower and herb beds to u-pick!  You'll sign up in advance, but there's plenty of slots and you can sign up multiple times.  Details are below.
  • Summer brings with it that sound of lawn equipment with loud, two-stroke engines--leaf blowers, chain saws, weed whackers and hedge trimmers.  I was surprised to hear from some professional landscapers that the electric, rechargeable versions of these hand tools are rugged, lightweight and effective--years ago they needed long cords or they didn't have enough power for professional use.  Technology has advanced!  They come with battery packs that are interchangeable between tools.  If you rely on a landscaping service, this is a good time to nudge them to change their equipment.  And if you rely on yourself for that work, maybe it's time for an upgrade!

This week's share

  • 1 head garlic
  • 2+ pounds tomatoes
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1 squash and/or 1 cucumber (depending on size)
  • 2 pounds yellow potatoes
  • 1 pound yellow onions
  • 1 shishito and 1 jalapeno chili pepper
  • Each pick-up will have 2-3 options of the following, and you will select one:  1 eggplant, 1 Korean melon or 1 pint okra 

U-Pick!

The rules:

  • Before you u-pick, please sign up here.  If you need to make changes to the slots you signed up for, just log back into that SignupGenius page and make the changes directly--no need to send us an email or call to alert us.
  • During the CSA pick-up times (Wednesdays 3-7pm and Saturdays 1-4pm), we kept the u-pick slot to only 30 minutes, because the parking space is precious and we want as many of you to enjoy the u-pick opportunity as possible.  Outside of CSA pick-up hours, you can stay a full hour, you can park where you'd like, and you can sign up for multiple slots to stay longer if you'd like.  
  • U-pick is open to CSA members only.  When you sign up, please use the name of the person who purchased the share, even if it's different from the person who will actually be picking.    

Here's what's available to u-pick:

  • Behind the washing station in the herb garden:
    • Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    • Lemon Verbena
    • Lemon Balm
    • Spearmint
    • Thyme
    • Oregano
    • Cutting celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    • Sage
    • Parsley
    • Sorrel
    • Summer Savory
    • Shiso
    • Garlic Chives
    • Onion Chives
    • Marjoram
    • Behind the herbs there are lots of flowers.  It's a little jungle-y back there, but you can help yourselves.
  • In the "D" field, which is in front of the barns, on your right side as you drive into the farm:
    • Zinnias and other flowers
    • Green Beans - these beans are getting tough so we don't think it's worth picking them for your shares, but if you'd like them, you may pick them.  There's plenty.
    • Chard - The chard is about finished for the season.  It's got bug holes and we don't think it's worth picking for the shares, so you can glean what remains if you'd like.  
  • In the "G2" field, which is just past the washing station on your right side.  If you pick up your share here on the farm, you park between the washing station and field G2.  
    • Sunflowers have just begun to bloom

Recipes

  • First, an apology--I tried out that vegan version of the baked green tomatoes from last week's email and it was not delicious.  I still hold to the opinion that the classic fried green tomato is worth enjoying if you've never given yourself the opportunity.  Fortunately for me, the share this week is full of vegetables that you probably already have good ideas for how to prepare and eat, so the pressure is low.  
  • Garlic Mashed Potatoes, from The Modern Vegetarian Kitchen by Peter Berley.
    • Ingredients:
      • 2 pounds potatoes, peeled and quartered
      • 8 cloves garlic, peeled and left whole
      • 1 sprig fresh rosemary (optional)
      • coarse sea salt 
      • 5 tablespoons olive oil
      • freshly milled black pepper
    • In a large pot over high heat, combine the potatoes with enough cold water to cover by 2 inches, and bring to a boil.  Reduce the heat to medium-low and add the garlic, rosemary and 1 teaspoon salt.  Simmer, covered for 20-30 minutes, until the potatoes are tender.  Drain, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water.  Remove and discard the rosemary.
    • Mash the potatoes well.  Slowly add the oil and beat in with a stiff wire whisk or wooden spoon until fluffy and creamy.  Adjust the consistency with a bit of the reserved water, if necessary.  
    • Add salt and pepper to taste and serve.
  • I'm a big fan of Madhur Jaffrey.  Here's a potato and tomato recipe of hers.  Don't worry about what is classified as a "boiling potato".  Both the red ones from last week or the yellow ones from this week will work well here.  And if you don't have a dry chili from leftover from last year, you can easily substitute one of the jalapenos from this week.  Consider adding a bell pepper, some chunks of squash, eggplant or okra to this dish.  It works well with whatever vegetables you have around. 


Coming Soon

  • Lots more tomatoes!
  • Sweet, ripe peppers, probably by week 13
  • More eggplant in the weeks to come
  • The okra field is growing quite well, so if you are an okra fan, get ready.  
  • Red onions are finished, but beginning next week you'll get red shallots.
  • Continuing: garlic, yellow onions, red and yellow potatoes
  • Squash, cucumbers and melons are petering out or finished for a while
  • More chili varieties will continue phasing in
  • Asian pears soon!
  • We are still battling with deer, raccoons, groundhogs and caterpillars to find out who will get the largest corn harvest, but we think we're going to win this one.  Week 13?  Stay tuned...

We've had some nice rains but the heat is even stronger, and soil moisture is dreadfully low.  We'd appreciate a nice, slow, rain.

You guys are wonderful!
Your farmer, Carrie, and the Clagett Farm Team


week 10: green tomatoes, shishitos and more

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These are shishito peppers.  Most of them are not spicy at all, but every so often you get one with some heat.  We put them in a little wax bag in your shares so you'd know they are different.  The other peppers in your bag are large, green, bell peppers.  We don't think you'll confuse them.  If you're hesitant to eat spicy peppers, this is a great entry-level chili to give your dish a little of the flavor without much heat.  The classic way you'd see them served in a bar is fried on a hot pan with some salt and oil.  The patrons who get a spicy one will order another beer.  
 

Announcements

  • It's hot outside.  Really hot.  And your plants have rebelled.  The beans and squash we were counting on have quit producing, and the tomatoes aren't quite ready.  But never fear!  We have promising weeks ahead.  Instead, you'll notice your share is a little heavier this week with some of the items that will keep well for many weeks to come--potatoes, onions and garlic.  
  • If any of you have kids that will be doing a little fishing this summer, you should check out the Fish Adaptation video from one of our educators, Leigh Auth (who has also been helping us in the farm fields!).  She explains how you can learn a lot about where a fish lives and what it eats based on the shape of its body.  
  • We were surprised and honored to be featured by Food & Wine as one of the best farms in Maryland!

This week's share

  • 2 heads garlic
  • 3 pounds potatoes
  • 1 pound red and yellow onions
  • 2 green (unripe) tomatoes (these will ripen if you wait long enough, but if you haven't tried fried green tomatoes yet, now's your chance!)
  • 1-3 cucumbers, depending on size
  • 2 green bell peppers
  • 2 shishito chili peppers (they vary from mild to no heat at all)
  • a couple other additions to your bag

Recipes

  • Fried Green Tomatoes: 
  • If you don't like fried green tomatoes, remember that green tomatoes are tart and crunchy, and you can eat them raw or cooked.  Here's a green tomato and melon salad recipe. It calls for honeydew melon, but consider swapping the honeydew for the yellow Korean melon that you might have in your share this week.  

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Coming Soon

  • Tomatoes are looking great.  Everyone will get some by next week.  
  • A few more weeks and you'll be getting sweet, ripe, orange and red peppers.  In the meantime, enjoy the green bells.
  • Within 2 weeks, we think we'll have enough eggplants for everyone.  
  • A little okra beginning next week, and then more in the weeks following.  The plants look good.  They're recovering well from some groundhog damage.
  • Potatoes, onions and garlic will continue.  Once we've given out all the red onions, we'll switch to shallots.  Yum!
  • Hot chili peppers are just getting their start with the shishitos this week.  Next up will probably be jalapenos.

Let's hope for a soaking rain and some cooler nights!

Thanks so much for being our members,
Carrie and the rest of the Clagett Farm team


Week 9: potatoes carrots onions beans

 

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Photo by Jared Planz

Announcements

  • If you ordered oysters for pick-up in Annapolis, don't forget to bring your ice chest this Thursday.
  • Do you have a pressure washer in good condition that you no longer use?  Ours broke and we're looking for a replacement. 
  • One of our members asked where they could buy a snazzy CBF hat.  The answer is, here!  We have all kinds of fun Chesapeake Bay merch for sale.  
  • A number of you have been confused by the sun jewel melons.  They are not squash!  The skin is yellow with white stripes, and the flesh is crisp, white and mildly sweet.  The skin and seeds are edible. 
  • Clagett7-15-2020 2

This week's share

  • 3-5 potatoes
  • A green bell pepper
  • 12 oz red and yellow onions
  • Half pound carrots
  • Some kale or collards (our last until fall)
  • 1-3 cucumbers (depends on size)
  • A yellow squash or zucchini
  • A head of garlic
  • Half pound beans
  • A choice of a flower bouquet or a bag of basil
  • We have a few items in short supply, so we're not sure which you'll get in your share--a couple small ears of corn?  an eggplant?  a pint of cherry tomatoes?  A small melon? Wait and see!

Recipe

  • This Lentil, Vegetable, Quinoa Salad is a good catch-all for whatever is haunting your fridge.  In these hot months you might want something fresh and light but still filling.    

Coming soon

  • Tomatoes, peppers and eggplants are just getting started.  Expect a trickle next week (week 10), and then we're forecasting a good amount by week 11.  
  • Several more weeks of potatoes, green beans and red and yellow onions.
  • Our main crop of corn should be ready around week 12, assuming we can keep the pests at bay.
  • Another little melon next week, we think.
  • Cucumbers and squash are on the decline.  A little more next week and then we're not sure.
  • Carrots are finished until fall.
  • Our first okra pods should start around week 11.  

Have a wonderful week!
The Clagett Farm Team