Week 23: Coming back to our roots. Big ones.

Sheep loving this fall weather, maybe even more than we are....maybe.

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Announcements

  • U-picking is still going on for herbs and any flowers you can find around farm (all by wash station, and some extra striped marigolds over by the where the sunflowers were in G2)
  • Dupont members, many of you didn't get garlic in your share last week.  Remind Carrie at your next pick up and we'll give you the missed garlic.  Sorry!
  • Don't forget about the oyster pop-up in Annapolis on October 29th.  The deadline for ordering is Monday (10/26).  And we'll have one on the farm on November 14th (details for that location coming later).  
  • We're still selling garlic!!! 
    For CSA members, the prices are $8/lb or a discounted $6/lb for purchases of at least 10 pounds. 
    Non-members pay $12/pound or $8/pound for 10 pounds or more. 
    If you're purchasing more than 10 pounds for pick up at Dupont or Annapolis, please give us at least one day advanced notice so we can be sure to get it in the van for you. 
    All the options are available for on-line purchase now.  We do not ship or deliver, except to our CSA pick-ups.  
  • It is Week 23 which means after this week, we only have 3 more weeks of shares! The season is coming to a close and we hope to leave you with your fill of greens, winter squash, radishes and turnips.  We are planning on digging up those small sweet potatoes soon as well for possibly Week 25.
  • Concerned about how to store your winter squash?  Here's the trick: do absolutely nothing.  That's right, you can use it as a door stop or bookend or festive table display.  And then 3 months from now, when you're thinking about how great it was to have a farm that grew vegetables for you, you can cook it and eat it.  So easy!  
  • Your final week of shares is November 11, 12 and 14.  Don't forget that you cannot take more than 2 shares at a time.  We can tell you at the pick-up how many you have remaining to use up.  
  • We can still use extra help in the fields with harvesting and other field work, any day, Tuesdays through Saturdays.  Call 301-627-4662 to sign up. 
       
        
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This week's share


  • 2 heads garlic
  • 1 winter squash (butternut)
  • 1 daikon radish
  • 1 watermelon radish
  • 1 large head bok choi
  • 1-3 eggplants (about a pound)
  • 3/4 pounds peppers
  • a few small French breakfast radishes
  • Choose 6 ounces of greens from a selection of options (including spicy mix and collards)
  • Optional: 6 ounces of a mild or hot blend of chilies

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Above, Elissa is gracefully displaying the rather extravagant size of one of our daikon radishes.  Be prepared for some big radishes in your bag today!  Note that the radish greens are quite delicious, so taste a little and decide if you'd like to cook with it or include some chopped leaves in your salad.  
 

Recipes


Aigo Bouido
Our volunteer, Vince Renard, likes to use our garlic to make this classic, French soup.
 
Creamy Winter Squash soup with ginger
TIME: 30 - 45 MINUTES (not including roasting time); SERVES: 6+
This soup can be made with almost any type of winter squash.  I prefer to use Kabocha because of its starchy, chestnut-like texture and flavor, but Butternut does wonders as well. 
*Go with a high-powered blender or food processor, rather than an immersion blender, for the silkiest texture.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 medium-large winter squash; roasted, flesh scooped out & reserved (about 2 cups)
  • 2 tbsp. unrefined coconut oil or ghee/butter
  • 1 large yellow or white onion (or 1 - 2 leeks), chopped
  • 1 - 3 carrots (opt.), chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1-inch piece ginger, grated
  • Water, vegetable broth, or chicken stock (amount depends on desired consistency)
  • 1, 14-oz. can full-fat coconut milk
  • ~1/4 tsp. each coriander, ground turmeric, & Ceylon cinnamon
  • A pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Juice from 1/2 - 1 lime (depending on size; to taste)
  • 1 tsp. fish sauce (opt.)
  • Kosher salt & fresh ground black pepper, to taste
  • Cilantro, chopped
  • Greek yogurt or crème fraîche


METHOD

  • Heat coconut oil or ghee/butter in a large dutch oven or soup pot. When hot enough to sizzle water, add the onions,celery, carrots, garlic, ginger, & spices. Cook until browned & fragrant.
  • Add the coconut milk and roasted winter squash. Add enough water or stock to barely cover. (You can always add more liquid, but it’s hard to cook the soup down once it’s too thin without adding more squash.)
  • Cover and simmer on low until soft and thoroughly cooked through, about 20 minutes. Stir often to avoid sticking.
  • Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Transfer carefully in batches to the blender or food processor and purée until creamy.
  • Adjust seasonings: add the lime, optional fish sauce, and salt & pepper to taste.
  • Ladle into bowls and garnish with chopped cilantro and yogurt or crème fraîche.

 
Daikon Radish Pickles
TIME: 15 MINUTES (plus overnight marinating); SERVES: 2 CUPS
This quick-pickle “brine” can be used for a variety of different veggies: radish, cucumber, kohlrabi, celery, etc.. You can make more or less brine depending on the amount of veggies you wish to pickle.  This is not a fermented pickle, like kimchi, so it's a good choice for people who don't want that strong fermented taste.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups daikon radish (or a mix of veggies), sliced into bite-size lengths, but thin enough to soak in the marinade (I like a long, rectangular shape, or half moon)
  • ~1 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup rice wine vinegar
  • ~1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup tamari, Nama Shoyu or soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp. mirin or Chinese Shaoxing wine (opt.)
  • A few dashes fish sauce
  • 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp. gochugaru or crushed red pepper flakes


METHOD

  • Place the sliced daikon radish in a large ziplock bag or a shallow pan/bowl. Sprinkle with kosher salt.
  • Combine half of the water plus all ingredients for the marinade in a separate bowl. Pour over the daikon. You want the majority of the radish to be touching the marinade. If you need more liquid, add the other 1/2 cup of water.
  • Let sit overnight in the fridge. Mix every few hours to incorporate the marinade on all sides. Pickles will keep for a couple weeks.


Enjoy this magnificent weather! 
The Clagett Farm Team


week 22 of 26 weeks: crunchy vegetables

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We have some new items in your bag this week, so these photos might help you identify them.  Above, from left to right: watermelon radish, hakurei turnip, purple top turnip, sora radish and French breakfast radish.  You won't get all of these items this week, but it helps to see them all together for comparison. 

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Bok choi and sunchokes (also known as Jarusalem artichokes)
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These winter squash might look funny but they have knock-out flavor.  Clockwise from center: Thai kang kob, seminole and kubocha.  Don't expect to get many of these unique varieties, since they were experiments for us, but you might see one this week.  

Announcements

  • If you want a chance to get outside and do something great for the world, plant trees this Saturday!  And if you can't do it this weekend, there will be another tree planting November 14th.  Here are the details, registration is required.  All summer these trees have been growing in our nursery, and these two plantings on farms in northern Maryland will keep excess fertilizer out of the streams, carbon out of the atmosphere, and a host of other wonderful benefits.  
  • As we mentioned last week, we can use your help in the fields with harvesting and other field work, any day, Tuesdays through Saturdays.  Call 301-627-4662 to sign up.   
  • We'll host an oyster pop-up in Annapolis on October 29th.  And we'll have one on the farm on November 14th (details for that location coming later).  
  • We're still selling garlic!  For CSA members, the prices are $8/lb or a discounted $6/lb for purchases of at least 10 pounds.  Non-members pay $12/pound or $8/pound for 10 pounds or more.  If you're purchasing more than 10 pounds for pick up at Dupont or Annapolis, please give us at least one day advanced notice so we can be sure to get it in the van for you.  All the options are available for on-line purchase now.  We do not ship or deliver, except to our CSA pick-ups.
  • We have one more month.  Your final week of shares is November 11, 12 and 14.  Don't forget that you can't take more than 2 shares at a time.  We can tell you at the pick-up how many you have remaining to use up.  

This week's share

  • 2 heads garlic
  • 1 winter squash
  • 1 pound radish and turnip medley
  • 2 heads bok choi
  • 1-3 eggplants
  • 3/4 pounds peppers
  • 1/4 pound sunchokes (this week only)
  • Choose 6 ounces of greens from a selection of options
  • Optional: 6 ounces of a mild or hot blend of chilies

Recipes

  • Sometimes a basic stir fry recipe is in order. This one focuses simply on the bok choi.  Consider adding chunks of winter squash, turnips and sunchokes.
    • Ingredients:
    • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 shallot, chopped
    • 1 pound bok choi, rinsed and cut into bite-sized pieces (if you received a baby head, you can quarter the heads length-wise with the core intact)
    • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce
    • Preparation:
    • Heat oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat.  Add garlic and shallot and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds.  Add bok choi, soy sauce and 2 Tablespoons water, and cover immediately.  Cook 1 minute.  Uncover and toss, then cover and cook until bok choi is tender at the core, about 3 more minutes. 
  • As you might expect us to say, you can add the radishes, turnips, sunchokes, and all the new varieties of squash to the list of vegetables that roast well.  Here's some hints for this week:
    • If you're in a hurry, cut your pieces smaller.  The winter squash can take an hour to roast if you leave it whole or cut in half.  But if you slice it thinly and coat each piece with a little oil, it could take as few as 15 minutes.  
    • If you get a bumpy variety of squash, don't feel obliged to peel it.  Thai kang kob and kubocha have thin, edible skins.  The seminole has a tough skin, so you might try scooping it out of it's skin, once cooked, which is a little easier than peeling.  The tough skin, by the way, is one of its assets--seminoles can store on your shelf for a year!  
    • Sunchokes taste best if they are roasted until they are very soft through the middle, like potatoes.
  • Soups are a perfect way to accomodate most winter vegetables, and sunchokes are no different.  I'm going to give you the French style, with lots of butter and cream.  Substitute for your dietary needs accordingly.  I'm leaving amounts vague to encourage you to make it to your tastes.  
    • Scrub the sunchokes and slice thinly.  Attentive chefs (not me) will recommend peeling them and after slicing, putting them in ice water to retain their white color. Slice turnips and squash if you wish to use them.  Note that squash with a green skin will change the color of the soup, so you might wish to peel it or leave it out for a different dish.  Do you have carrots you'd like to use up?  Slice them up, too.  Don't be too concerned about the width of your slices, just be aware that fatter slices take longer to cook.    
    • Choose a nice, heavy-bottomed dutch oven.  Melt butter (think about 2 Tablespoons butter for every pound of vegetables in the soup).  Add thinly sliced garlic and shallot to the butter until it is soft but not browned. Celery is also a nice addition at this point.   
    • Add the sunchokes and other vegetables to the pan, then pour in stock (at least enough to cover the vegetables), and simmer until the vegetables are very soft.  
    • Blend your soup.  Now is the time to add salt, pepper and cream to your liking, but don't skimp--those ingredients are important.  I like to use an immersion blender so I don't have to pour hot soup into a blender and back again.
    • Return to the heat until it's piping hot but not boiling.  
  • You might not need help coming up with salad recipes, but here's an interesting one from Farmer John's Cookbook (John Peterson is famous in farmer circles from Angelic Organics Farm in Illinois): Young Turnip and Apricot Salad with Toasted Walnuts and Creamy Greens Dressing.  You could very easily include radishes with the turnips in this salad.  


Coming Soon

  • We've finally flattened the okra crop in order to get a good cover crop established.  The cover crop (a combination of rye, vetch and crimson clover) will fertilize and protect the soil until May 2021, when we'll plant your peppers in that field.  The okra plants measured in at 14 feet and 3 inches!  It was our tallest okra crop ever.
  • This is the last week of watermelon radishes, sora radishes and hakurei turnips.  We'll continue to see purple top turnips and French breakfast radishes, and next week we'll add some daikon radishes to the share, which are quite large!  Kimchi lovers, now is your time to shine!  Kimchi, as well as other types of vegetables fermented in salt or whey, are magnificently healthy for your digestive system, and the pasteurized versions of pickles at the store don't have that same benefit.  But not everyone loves the flavor.  If you're new to the idea, check out anything written by Sandor Katz.  Fermenting is incredibly easy, it doesn't require fancy equipment, and despite your fears, you won't mess up and make yourself sick.  
  • The eggplant and pepper fields were under-seeded with cover crop.  Under-seeding allows the eggplant and peppers to continue growing, but the cover crop doesn't establish quite as well.  Fortunately, we won't need their fields again until fall 2021, so we can grow a summer cover crop after this one to double our impact.  
  • The greens in your shares should remain about the same for the next several weeks, including bok choi.

Have a wonderful week, and thank you!
The Clagett Farm Team


Week 21: Crooknecks!

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These are Pennsylvania Dutch Crooknecks.  They are an heirloom winter squash renowned for their great flavor and for the ratio of squash that is seed-free, making it a little easier to prepare.  Don't be intimidated by their size.  You can chop off the part you want to use immediately and keep the rest in your fridge for weeks.  Or you can roast the entire thing and freeze a bunch of it for some future use (soup is my favorite).  Or maybe you don't want to use any of it just yet? All of our winter squashes will keep for months, unrefrigerated, as long as they haven't been cut or nicked.  If you don't have plans for your crookneck, butternuts or acorns right away, tuck them on a shelf until you feel inspired--some wintery holiday when you can amaze your family with your fantastic pumpkin pie (crooknecks make a better pie than orange pumpkins anyway).   
 

Announcements

  • Garlic - new wholesale prices
    You can now purchase 10 pounds or more for $6/pound ($8/pound for non-members)  
    For fewer than 10 pounds, the price remains $8/pound for CSA members and $12/pound for non-members.  Pay with cash or check (made out to CBF), or purchase on-line HERE. (For now, this link is for the $8/lb price only.  We'll adjust for the new wholesale option shortly.) 
  • We're now welcoming volunteers on Saturdays!  Our friends from the education department have gone back to their normal, educating duties, so we're hoping to get some help with harvests (Tuesdays and Fridays) and field work (Thursdays and Saturdays).  We can take up to 10 people at a time, and adults can take one CSA share in exchange for 5 hours of work.  Call the farm line to sign up: 301-627-4662.   
  • Do you have a lawn?  As a steward of your land, the choices you make can either help clean the Bay or pollute it.  You can sequester carbon or release it.  TONIGHT the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and Glenstone Museum are holding a webinar with experts ready to give you ideas, and none to soon--fall is the perfect time to establish new plants in your yard.  
  • Has this year inspired you to wonder why our food system is so fragile?  Do you have ideas about how to make it more resilient?  Future Harvest would like to hear your ideas!  Let's use this crisis to create  system that will stand up to our next crisis more successfully.  
  • If you're thinking of owning a farm business someday, a great place to start is with the Future Harvest Beginner Farmer Training Program.  They are accepting applications now for 2021, and the deadline is soon--October 16.   

This week's share

  • 2 heads garlic
  • 1 Pennsylvania Dutch Crookneck
  • 1 Eggplant
  • 1/2 pound Sweet Peppers 
  • 1 Watermelon Radish
  • 1 small piece of fresh ginger

    Choose one 
  • Spicy Mix (this week's blend is heavy with tokyo bekana, so it is quite mild)
  • Arugula
  • Tatsoi
  • Collards 

    You may also add on 
  • Okra -  6 oz
  • Chilies, mild or hot -  6 oz

Recipes

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Wondering what to do with a watermelon radish? Here are some great links for some ideas:

The Pennsylvania Dutch Crookneck can be used the same way you would butternut squash.  The world abounds with excellent squash soup recipes, but if you haven't found one you like yet, here's a place to start: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/squash-soup-recipe2-1956330.  Don't add the honey until you've tasted the roasted squash--it might be sweet enough that you don't want it.  The cream and butter can be easily substituted with soymilk and olive oil.  Sometimes I add pearl barley to soups to make it a more filling meal.  And some other additions that I find delicious are blue cheese, harissa (or some smoky hot sauce of your choice) and a topping of roasted squash seeds.  Also, I sometimes use apples or apple cider as a sweetener instead of honey.  

Have you been roasting squash seeds?  Don't throw them out until you've tried it!  When you scoop the seeds out of your raw winter squash, pull them away from the stringy orange bits (no need to be picky--a little bit adds to the flavor), and put them on a baking sheet.  Pour a generous amount of olive oil on top and sprinkle some salt (smoky paprika and cayenne are also good additions, but keep it simple your first try).  Mix around the seeds so they all have a coating of oil, and spread them out on the pan.  Then roast them in a hot oven (400F is good) or even toasting in your toaster oven works.  Cook them until they're brown.  You'll often hear them start to pop when they're about done.  It helps to mix around the seeds midway, but is not necessary.   

That little piece of ginger in your share this week is a tiny nugget of gold.  It is packed with strong ginger flavor but without the fibers.  There's no need to peel it.  You can makea healthy, energizing tea with your ginger, toss bits of it in your smoothies, or use it as you would regular ginger in any recipe.  If you can't bring yourself to use it this week, you should freeze it to keep the strong flavor.  

Coming Soon

  • Next week we're planning to harvest the bok choi, and it's beautiful. 
  • Once we've finished the watermelon radishes (next week?  week 23?) we'll start giving out some daikon radishes.
  • Next week we might offer a choice of some other unique squash varieties.
  • The rest of the share next week should be about the same as this one.  The peppers, eggplant and okra are slowing down, so those weights are getting lighter each week.

We'd like to end with this little gem.  We've been seeing tree frogs in our okra field.  Of the seven classes of vertebrate animals, amphibians (including frogs) are suffering the greatest rates of extinction, and they are particularly vulnerable to pesticides because they breath through their skin.  You can feel reassured that your organic farm is a refuge for these beautiful little creatures.  
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Photo by David Tana.

Have a wonderful week, everyone,
The Clagett Farm Team


Another beautiful bag of vegetables

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Lacinato Kale and Cabbage are freshly weeded and coming along nicely

Announcements

  • Week 20 of 26!  Just a month and a half left of fresh-from-the-farm salads.
  • Garlic is still for sale in bulk!
    Only $8 per pound for CSA members ($12/lb for non-members)  
    Pay with cash or check (made out to CBF), or purchase on-line HERE. This link is for CSA members only. 
  • We have some bad news.  The sweet potatoes are not sizing up the way they normally do.  We've never seen a sweet potato crop that looks so healthy and (relatively) weed-free but isn't growing potatoes.  Our best guess is that much of the growing season was overcast, and the 2 fields they are in are shaded part of the day by tall trees.  Thank goodness we had such a surprising abundance of winter squash!  They substitute for each other nicely. We will wait as long as we can to dig the potatoes.  You can expect to see a few in the last or penultimate share (week 25 or 26).  

This week's share

  • Garlic (2 heads)
  • Acorn squash (2)
  • Eggplant (1.5 pounds)
  • Sweet Peppers (3/4 pound)
  • White turnips & red radishes (a few)
  • Green Tomatoes (a few)
  • Choose one 6-ounce bag of greens: spicy mix (this week's mix is heavy on arugula), tokyo bekana (a mustard that looks and tastes like lettuce), red russian kale or collards
  • Wednesday and Thursday get a small bag of green, yellow and purple beans.  Saturday members got their beans last week.
  • Optional: 1/4 pound okra
  • Optional: 1/2 pound mixed chilies

Recipes

Winter Squash Gnocchi with Brown Butter and Sage

Ingredients

  • 1 head of garlic, top third cut off
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, for rubbing
  • 1 pound baking potatoes
  • One 2-pound butternut squash (or other winter squash)—peeled, seeded and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 2 large egg yolks, at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup fresh ricotta cheese
  • 2 tablespoons minced flat-leaf parsley
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 stick unsalted butter
  • 10 sage leaves, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • Parmigiano-Reggiano shavings, for serving 

How to Make It

Step 1    

Preheat the oven to 375º. Place racks in the lower and middle thirds of the oven. Drizzle the garlic with olive oil, wrap it tightly in foil and roast on the bottom rack of the oven for 50 minutes. Lightly rub the potatoes with olive oil, prick them all over with a fork and bake on the lower rack for 45 minutes, until fork-tender. Line a large baking sheet with foil. Add the squash and rub with olive oil. Bake on the upper rack for about 30 minutes, stirring once, until soft.


Step 2    

Squeeze the roasted garlic cloves out of their skins into a small bowl and mash to a paste. Peel the hot potatoes and pass them through a ricer into a large bowl. Add the hot squash to the ricer and pass it into the bowl with the potatoes. Let cool slightly. Add the egg yolks, ricotta, parsley, 1 tablespoon of salt and 1 tablespoon of the mashed roasted garlic (reserve any extra for another use). Stir until combined. Sprinkle on the 1 1/4 cups of flour and gently stir it in. Scrape the dough onto a floured surface and knead gently until smooth but still slightly sticky.


Step 3    

Line a baking sheet with wax paper and dust with flour. Cut the gnocchi dough into 5 pieces and roll each piece into a 3/4-inch-thick rope. Cut the ropes into 1/2-inch pieces and transfer the gnocchi to the baking sheet.


Step 4    

Lightly oil another baking sheet. In a large, deep skillet of simmering salted water, cook half of the gnocchi until they rise to the surface, then simmer them for 1 to 2 minutes longer, until cooked through. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the gnocchi to the baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining gnocchi.


Step 5    

In a large nonstick skillet, melt the butter over moderate heat and cook until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add the sage and thyme and cook for 20 seconds. Add the gnocchi and cook for 1 minute, tossing gently. Season with salt and serve, passing the cheese shavings at the table.

 Make Ahead

The gnocchi can be prepared through Step 3 and frozen on the baking sheet, then transferred to a resealable plastic bag and frozen for up to 1 month. Boil without defrosting.

A few more recipes for winter squash that we liked:

  • Black Lentil and Harissa-Roasted Veggie Bowl - I don't usually cook with black lentils, and found these delightful.  If you can't find black lentils, try substituting with french lentils, which also stay relatively firm.  I used a butternut squash instead of sweet potatoes and it worked beautifully. Also, I didn't have any fresh ripe tomatoes, so I threw some dried tomatoes into the lentils and that seemed like a good substitute. This recipe is vegan and grain-free.
  • Creamy Squash Risotto with Toasted Pepitas - This recipe takes a little while.  I made the squash puree on one day and then the risotto on another, so it didn't seem like such a bear.  I don't normally keep white miso paste around but it was definitely worth having for this dish--it gives the squash a complex, umami flavor.  And don't leave out the pepitas with smoked paprika--they do a lot to boost the excitement of this dish.   


Coming Soon

  • Still crossing our fingers for the first frost to hold off for as long as possible! For eggplant, peppers and okra, a hard frost will be their doom!  Be sure to get your fill while they are still around.
     
  • While the cool weather slows down some crops, it gives a boost to the greens, turnips and radishes.  Watermelon radishes, bok choi and tat soi are all coming in the next few weeks.   



Thanks so much for all your smiling faces.  It's certainly a relief to be part of a warm and inclusive community.  Robust health to you and all the people you love!
The Clagett Farm Team


Butternuts are the best

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We sure do love this fall weather.  Can you believe this wagon-load of winter squash?  And there's more still to pick from the field!  Photos by Elissa Planz.   
 

Announcements

  • CBF is hosting a Tuesday evening series of classes about the Chesapeake Bay and how to help.  We're especially welcoming residents of Prince George's County and Montgomery County to this fall's series.  Now is a great time to get involved.  Learn more HERE.
  • Your last week of CSA shares is November 11, 12 and 14.  We are currently in week 19 of 26. 

This week's share

  • Garlic, 2 heads
  • Winter Squash, 2 butternuts!
  • Sweet peppers, 5-7
  • Eggplant, 1 pound
  • Green Tomatoes, 1-2
  • Choose: quarter pound salad mix or half pound collards
  • Choose: half pound chilies or okra

Recipes

  • I love roasting vegetables.  It's so easy!  Give yourself time to heat up the oven to about 400 degrees F, roll your big chunks of veggies in oil and salt, lay them in a single layer on a pan, and about 25 minutes later (depends on size and vegetable) you have transformed your share to something even picky eaters can't resist.  It's like magic.  Be sure to include garlic and chunks of onion because they make the whole house smell fabulous.  
  • Epicurious posted a great guide to roasting vegetables.  We pulled out a few of the relevant ones below:
    • Eggplant: You’ll notice that a lot of recipes for cooking eggplant begin by instructing you to dice or slice, then salt the pieces and set them aside to draw out the moisture. That’s great for sautéing, where the cooking is usually quick, but it isn’t really necessary for roasting eggplant.
      What is necessary: high heat and plenty of room. Crank the oven to 450°F, then toss eggplant with oil and salt, lay in a single layer on a sheet pan, and roast for 20–25 minutes, checking early if your pieces are small.
    • Peppers: What we tend to call roasted peppers aren’t technically roasted—usually. Instead, they’re blistered on a grill, under a broiler, or right on the eye of a gas stove until the skin is blackened. Then they’re placed in a covered bowl to steam, and finally the blackened skin is rubbed away with the help of a kitchen towel to reveal the tender pepper flesh. From there you can marinate them if you like.
      However, peppers can be roasted the traditional way too. Cut bell peppers in half to make boats that can be stuffed, then pull out the seeds and white pithy ribs by hand. Toss with oil and salt and roast cup side down at 375°F for 35–45 minutes. If you like, stuff with cooked rice or tomatoes and cheese and return to the oven to warm through or melt.
    • Winter Squash: Here we go with the pumpkin, the butternut, the acorn, the spaghetti, the kabocha, and all the many, many varieties of autumn and winter squash that abound throughout the year’s coldest days.
      Whether or not you choose to peel the squash is entirely up to you. I find that, generally, squash skin tastes great and peeling it only results in slippery, hard-to-handle veg. (Watch your fingers!) And for the squash skin that’s a little too tough to eat: The flesh scrapes away easily after it’s cooked.
      Squash roasts best when the flesh makes contact with the pan, but if slicing into a large, firm squash sounds like Dangertown to you, go ahead and prick it a few times to let the steam escape, then roast it whole (425°F for about 30 minutes), or prick and then toss it in the microwave to soften for about 8 minutes on high. Then halve or cut into slices, wedges, or chunks, discard the seeds, drizzle with oil and season with salt, and roast for another 20 minutes. 
      If you’re roasting squash that hasn’t been precooked, turn the heat down to about 400°F and cook for 40–50 minutes, tossing once or twice, until browned.

U-Pick

  • Not much has changed on the u-pick list this week, except that flower pickings are slim (the zinnias bit the dust) and the okra is super tall!  To pick the okra, you have to gently bend the plant down toward the ground to reach the small pods about a foot below the tip of the plant.  
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If you can believe it, this was taken 3 weeks ago, and now the okra is over 12 feet! This photo of our normal-sized co-worker, Kellie Fiala, was taken by David Tana.
 

Coming Soon

  • This is probably the last week of green tomatoes.  Have you tried tossing chunks of one into your stir fry or salad?  Or you can treat it like a tomatillo and make the last fresh salsa picante of the season.
  • You'll start seeing a few sweet turnips soon to go with your salad greens.  
  • Hopefully the photos make it clear that you have lots more winter squash for the weeks to come, particularly acorn and butternut.  
  • Sweet potatoes still have a lot of sizing up to do.  Let's hope we don't get an early frost.  
  • Peppers, eggplant and okra are hanging in there but have slowed way down.  They'll die with the first frost. We're taking bets on how tall the okra will be before it finally dies (over 12 feet at press time!).

If you need to keep your spirits up these days, take a deep breath and enjoy this perfect weather.  There's all kinds of reasons to take to the streets these days.

Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Acorn squash, and your first taste of fall salad greens

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This week's share

Garlic - 2 heads
Acorn Squash - 2
Sweet Peppers - 4
Tomatoes - 1 ripening, several green
Salad mix - 1 small bag
Basil - 1 large bag

Optional:
Okra
 - 1.5 pounds
Hot or mild chili medley -  6 ounces
Eggplant - 2.5 pounds

*numbers vary depending on the size of the vegetables,
 everyone gets about the same weights
 


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The varieties in your salad mix, clockwise from bottom left: Red Russian Kale, Tokyo Bekana Mustard, Astro Arugula, Mizuna Mustard, Red Mustard, Tat soi.  Later, you might have a choice of some of these varieties alone, so this is your chance to try them all.
 

Next coming weeks... 

While things like the tomatoes have faded away, this weather has made room for the fall crops.  You'll get a tiny amount of salad greens this week just as a start.  Soon we'll also have kale and collards.  We expect to keep harvesting eggplant, sweet peppers, and okra until October.  And of course, you'll get garlic until the end!

As mentioned last week in the email we will be starting our sweet potato harvest in about a month and right now the field looks great!  In the meantime, we're giving out winter squash--you'll see us cycle through a number of different delicious varieties over the weeks to come.  
 

Reminders... 

Garlic for sale in bulk

Only $8 per pound for CSA members

(We'll be charging $12 per pound to non-CSA members once we know our CSA members have had their fill.)  

*Cash or check (made out to CBF), or purchase on-line HERE. This link is for CSA members only.

Note that streaks and spots of purple, black and brown are normal, natural colors to see on our garlic.  

Curious what the Chesapeake Bay Foundation is up to? 

There's a lot!  Here's just a few highlights:

  • We just sued the EPA for failing to hold Pennsylvania accountable.  
  • Your farm just got a cameo in a snazzy video 
  • The education program has begun live on-line classes for students that are incredibly engaging, in spite of being confined to your computer screen.  

U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link here: U-PICK SIGN UP

The following are available for u-pick:

  • Okra (field B2)- This field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter the farm you will keep right at the first fork to go towards the main office.  You may park near the garage area and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind the garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4, but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant.  Please wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Flowers - You can pick any flowers you see on the farm.  There are still zinnias in field D in the middle.  The sunflowers in field G2 have matured into seed, which you can feed your wild birds or save to plant next year.  
  • Herbs -  Everything on this list is behind the washing station.  If you desire more Genovese Basil (the one traditionally used for pesto), it will be located down near the zinnias in field D (the big field you pass on your right as you're driving into the farm).
    • Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    • Cutting celery
    • Garlic Chives (with edible flowers)
    • Lemon Balm (looking especially lush right now
    • Lemongrass
    • Lemon Verbena
    • Marjoram
    • Onion Chives
    • Oregano
    • Sage
    • Shiso
    • Sorrel
    • Spearmint
    • Sweet potato greens
    • Thyme

 

Recipes 

Blistered Shishito Peppers

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  • Prep time: 3 minutes
  • Cook time: 6 minutes
  • Yield: serves 2-4

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 20 or so shishito peppers (about 4 or 5 ounces, 1 small basket)
  • Sprinkle of kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (optional)

METHOD

1 Toss peppers with oil: Toss shishito peppers with extra virgin olive oil in a bowl, so the peppers are well coated.

2 Sear in frying pan: Heat a well seasoned cast iron (or a pan that can take high heat) on high heat. When the pan is hot, add the peppers to the pan in a single layer. Let the peppers sear and blister on one side, then use tongs to turn them over individually to sear on the other side.

3 Salt: Remove to a bowl and sprinkle the shishito peppers with salt.

4 Make balsamic glaze (Optional):  Add a couple tablespoons of balsamic vinegar* to the pan. Remove from heat, and let bubble until the vinegar reduces to a glaze, which should be very quickly. Pour over the blistered shishito peppers.

*Balsamic vinegar can be syrupy and sweet, or thin and acidic. Use the syrupy kind. If what you have is thin and very acidic, stir with a half teaspoon of sugar or honey before adding to the hot pan.

Baked Acorn Squash with Butter and Brown Sugar

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Easy baked acorn squash recipe, perfect for the fall. Squash is cut in half, insides scooped out, then baked with a little butter, brown sugar, and maple syrup.

  • Prep time: 10 minutes
  • Cook time: 1 hour, 15 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 2 to 4, depending on how much squash you like to eat.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 Acorn squash
  • 1 Tbsp Butter
  • 2 Tbsp Brown Sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Maple Syrup
  • Dash of Salt

METHOD

1 Preheat your oven to 400°F (205°C).

2 Prep the squash: If you have a microwave, microwave the squash for a minute each, to make it easier to cut. Stabilize the squash on a cutting board as best you can, stem end down if the stem is short enough, otherwise on the side. Using a sharp, sturdy chef's knife, carefully cut the acorn squash in half, from tip to stem. If on its side, the squash can rock back and forth, so take care as you are cutting it.

Use a sturdy metal spoon to scrape out the seeds and stringy bits inside each squash half, until the inside is smooth.

Take a sharp paring knife and score the insides of the acorn squash halves in a cross-hatch pattern, about a half-inch deep cuts.

Place the squash halves cut side up in a roasting pan. Pour 1/4-inch of water over the bottom of the pan so that the squash doesn't burn or get dried out in the oven.

3 Add butter, salt, brown sugar, maple syrup: Rub a half tablespoon of butter into the insides of each half. Sprinkle with a little salt if you are using unsalted butter.

Crumble a tablespoon of brown sugar into the center of each half and drizzle with a teaspoon of maple syrup.

4 Bake: Bake at 400°F (205°C) for about an hour to an hour 15 minutes, until the tops of the squash halves are nicely browned, and the squash flesh is very soft and cooked through.

It's hard to overcook squash, it just gets better with more caramelization. But don't undercook it.

5 Remove from oven, spoon brown sugar butter sauce over squash: When done, remove the squash halves from the oven and let them cool for a bit before serving.

Spoon any buttery sugar sauce that has not already been absorbed by the squash over the exposed areas.



Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Feeling like Fall

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This week's share

Garlic - 2 heads
Small Pie Pumpkin - 1
Sweet Peppers - 6 to 8
Eggplant - 2 to 3 
Tomatoes - 1.25 pounds

Optional:
Okra
- 1.5 pounds
Hot or mild chili medley -  6 ounces

*numbers vary depending on the size of the vegetables,
 everyone gets about the same weights
 



 

Updates

  • Garlic for sale in bulk

Only $8 per pound for CSA members
(We'll be charging $12 per pound to non-CSA members once we know our CSA members have had their fill.)  
*Cash or check (made out to CBF), or purchase on-line HERE. This link is for CSA members only.
Note that purple, black and brown are normal, natural colors to see on our garlic.  

  • Photographed above are some members of our crew (from left: Matt, Jared and Ronnie) taking back some of the flower and herb garden behind the wash station from all the weeds this past Saturday.  Thanks guys!
  • Remember when we forecast an early demise of the tomatoes and winter squash due to the frequent rains we had in June, July and August?  We had 10 rain events in August for a total of 16 inches, which is a lot!  The tomatoes gave us a bumper crop in their short lives, but alas, they've petered out prematurely.  And yet!  The winter squash looks amazing!  This week you're getting a little pie pumpkin, which is both ornamental and edible.  In the coming weeks, you should see some butternuts, acorns and more.  We're relieved and delighted.  And speaking of fall crops to come, the sweet potato crop also looks healthy and abundant.  We expect to start digging them in about a month, and they need a week to cure.  
  • One of our members asked why we sell the garlic to you instead of including it all in your shares.  Garlic is a high-value per pound item that stores well and lends itself to keeping some on hand to sell.  It's also a crop that grows relatively easily for us, and we usually have more than most of our members want.  It makes sense to give a moderate amount of garlic to all of you, and then sell the rest.  That way we can make some additional revenue to help cover the cost of the tens of thousands of pounds of produce that we donate.  This year, more than ever, we're having to grow more and spend more time packaging your shares, without charging more to you, our members.  And consider, also, that you're getting a deep discount on garlic if you decide to purchase some extra.  Thanks!  

U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link below 
U-PICK SIGN UP


Please still note there is NO u-pick of tomatoes and chilies.  Those plants have slowed down production.

The following are available for u-pick:

  • Okra (field B2)- This field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter the farm you will keep right at the first fork to go towards the main office.  You may park near the garage area and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind the garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4, but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant.  Please wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Flowers - You can pick any flowers you see on the farm, including the Sunflowers in field G2.  
  • Herbs -  Everything on this list is behind the washing station.  If you desire more Genovese Basil (the one traditionally used for pesto), it will be located down near the zinnias in field D (the big field you pass on your right as you're driving into the farm).
    • Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    • Cutting celery
    • Garlic Chives (with edible flowers)
    • Lemon Balm (looking especially lush right now
    • Lemon Verbena
    • Marjoram
    • Onion Chives
    • Oregano
    • Sage
    • Shiso
    • Sorrel
    • Spearmint
    • Summer Savory
    • Thyme
    • New - We have a small patch of sweet potatoes in the herb garden which you may cut for their delicious greens.

 

Recipes

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GRILLED EGGPLANT CAPRESE

Grilled eggplant caprese features perfectly grilled eggplant, juicy summer tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and basil. It’s an easy, healthy and delicious summer dish perfect for using seasonal eggplant! (gluten-free, vegetarian, nut-free)

 

Ingredients

  • 1 small eggplant, cut horizontally into 1/2” slices
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Coarse sea salt
  • freshly cracked black pepper

Instructions

  • Slice eggplant, tomato and mozzarella into 1/2″ rounds using a sharp knife.
  • Heat a grill or grill pan to medium high heat.
  • Brush eggplant with oil on both sides and sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper.
  • Grill eggplant for 3-4 minutes per side. Remove from grill.
  • Arrange eggplant on a platter, alternating with tomato and mozzarella slices.
  • Drizzle with balsamic reduction or balsamic vinegar. Sprinkle with basil and serve.

Notes

  • Don’t be afraid to oil and season the eggplant well! This will bring out the best flavor and texture.
  • Serve warm, cold, or room temperature. Anything goes!
  • Serve with toasted sourdough bread for a truly delicious meal, appetizer, or side.
  • Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge
  • 2 medium ripe tomatoes, cut into 1/2” slices
  • 8 oz fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced into 1/2” slices
  • Fresh basil leaves, roughly torn
  • Balsamic reduction, or balsamic vinegar


     

Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Where did August go?

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This week's share

Garlic - 1 

Sweet Peppers - 8 to 10
Eggplant - 1 to 3
Squash - 1 or 2 
Tomatoes - 4
Okra - 1 pound
(numbers vary depending on the size of the vegetables so everyone gets about the same weights)
Choice of hot chili medley, mild chili medley, garlic chives or tulsi basil
 

Updates

This week we will be starting to offer garlic for sale in bulk
Only $8 per pound for CSA members
(We'll be charging $12 per pound to non-CSA members once we know our CSA members have had their fill.)  Sorry, we misstated the price last week!  
*Cash or check (made out to CBF).  We'll have on-line payment for garlic set up soon.*
Note that it is normal for our garlic to have streaks of purple, black and brown.  We're not sure why garlic in the store is so much whiter--we attribute it to the varieties we grow and our natural process of curing.

There is NO u-pick of tomatoes and chilies.  Those plants have slowed down production.

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This adorable skink caught Carrie's attention as she was photographing your chilies.  These native lizards are beneficial--they don't bite, and they eat insects.  Thanks, skinks!
The chilies in the photo at the top of this e-mail are arranged in order of heat, from least hot on the left to most hot on the right: Mellow Star Shishito, Bastan Poblano, Highlander Anaheim, Red Ember Cayenne, Aji Chinchi Amarillo, El Jefe Jalapeno, Hot Rod Serrano, and Hot Paper Lantern Habanero.  All of them ripen red except the yellow one, so the ones in your bag might be red (ripe) or green (unripe).  Both are hot, but the ripe ones might be hotter. 


U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link below 

U-PICK SIGN UP


The following are available for u-pick:

  •  Okra (field B2)- This field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter farm you will keep right at the first fork to go towards the main office.  You may park near the garage area and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4 but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Flowers - You can pick any flowers you see on the farm, but in particular, the Sunflowers are blooming nicely (those are located in field G2, which is just past the washing station, where you pick up your share).  
  • Herbs -  Everything on this list is behind the washing station.  If you desire more Genovese Basil (the one traditionally used for pesto), it will be located down near the zinnias in field D (the big field you pass on your right as you're driving into the farm).
    Basils (Genovese, Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    Garlic Chives (with edible flowers)
    Lemon Balm (looking especially lush right now
    Lemon Verbena
    Marjoram
    Onion Chives
    Oregano
    Sage
    Shiso
    Sorrel
    Spearmint
    Summer Savory
    Thyme

 

Recipes

Roasted Pasta in a Dutch Oven

  • One of your fellow members, Maria Foscarinis, recommended putting bow tie pasta into an oven-safe pot with the raw tomatoes and other ingredients of pasta sauce (chopped vegetables, garlic, onion, herbs) and roasting the mix in a hot oven until the sauce and pasta are cooked to your liking.  Roasting the tomatoes intensifies the flavor and caramelizes some of the sugars, and there's no need to boil the pasta separately.

Stuffed Sweet Peppers

  • Long grain white rice – leftover rice works great if you have some.
  • Sweet Peppers- bell-shaped I cut tops off, others are halved 
  • Olive oil – only a little is needed for sauteing. 
  • Ground beef (optional of course can always sub in extra veggies!)
  • Yellow onion and fresh garlic 
  • Tomato sauce 
  • Parsley, Oregano  
  • Mozzarella cheese 

How to Make

Precook peppers so they are soft

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cook rice according to package instructions.
  • Meanwhile, trim about 1/4-inch from tops of bell peppers and halve smaller peppers, Then remove stems, ribs and seeds.
  • Fill a baking dish just large enough to fit peppers with about 1/2-inch of water then place peppers upside down in water, cover tightly with foil and bake 20 minutes.

    Making the filling
  • Meanwhile heat olive oil in a large non-stick skillet over-medium high heat. Add onion and saute 3 minutes.
  •  Move onions to one far side of the skillet. Add beef in chunks, season with salt and pepper then let sear until browned on bottom, about 2 – 3 minutes.
  • Break up beef and toss with onions and continue to cook 2 minutes, add garlic and cook until beef is cooked through about 1 minute longer.
  • Remove from heat! 
  • Stir in tomatoes, half of the tomato sauce (about 1/2 cup) save some to drizzle on at the end , cooked rice, parsley, Italian seasoning and season with salt and pepper to taste.

    Mix it all together
  • Reduce oven temperature to 350. Turn par-baked peppers upright and fill with beef filling.
  • Pour remaining tomato sauce over peppers. Cover with foil and continue to bake 20 minutes.
  • Remove from oven, sprinkle with cheese, return to oven and bake until peppers have reached desired tenderness, about 10 – 20 minutes (thinner peppers will be done near lesser time thicker near greater). Sprinkle with parsley and serve warm. Enjoy! 




Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Summer bounty continues

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These are some wonderful students (and very hard-working, patient parents) from Key School and Broadneck High School, picking okra for the Saturday share and for donation to SHABACH.  They have been helping us harvest each Friday since early July, sometimes bringing helpers from Broadneck High School.  We're especially appreciative of their work because they come every week, and work independently without a great deal of instruction.  Thank you!  Photo by V. Robbins.

 

This week's share

Garlic - 1 head
Onions - 1/4 pound
Sweet Peppers - several each of green, red and orange
Eggplants - 2-3
Squash - 1-2
Tomatoes - about 4 pounds

Optional:  a small bag each of hot chili peppers and okra, for those of you who like them.

  Next week we will be starting to offer garlic for sale in bulk
Only $5 per pound for CSA members
*Cash only and we ask for everyone purchasing to use exact change.  We will provide a dropbox for contactless payment*

 

U-pick 

Continue to sign up for u-picking through the link below 

U-PICK SIGN UP!!!

Everything is the same except we've removed chili peppers from u-pick--due to popularity the plants have asked for a break in order to keep growing peppers!

Tomatoes (field F) - all of the tomato varieties, IMPORTANT- these are not all tied up so be very careful where you step so as to not break plants or crush any good tomatoes!
Going down the field varieties include:
      Sun golds, orange cherry tomatoes 
      Sunrise bumble bee, larger striped cherry tomatoes 
     Garden peach, small, yellow, fuzzy with blushes of pink when ripe  
     Green Zebra, yellow/green with green stripes 
      Verona, red plum
      Roma, red oblong  
      New Girl, red slicing tomato

  •  Okra (field B2)- this field is way out there, and you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter the farm you will keep right to go towards main office.  You may park near the garage/shed beside the other vehicles, and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind garage.  As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4 but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)
  • Any Flowers you see on the farm, but in particular, the Sunflowers are blooming nicely ( those are located next to the large parking lot on the same side of the driveway as the washing station). Some Zinnias could probably still be found (in the large field that is passed on your right on the way into the farm across from the 3 barns, in field "D")  
  •  Herbs (which for the most part are located behind the washing station, if you desire more "Regular" Basil it will be located down in field D near the zinnias)

    Basils (Genovese "Regular", Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon)
    Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    Garlic Chives (now with edible flowers)
    Lemon Balm
    Lemon Verbena
    Marjoram
    Onion Chives
    Oregano

    Sage
    Shiso
    Sorrel
    Spearmint
    Summer Savory
    Thyme

     

Recipes 

Roasted Eggplant and Chickpea Stew
Good way to use up eggplant, peppers, and tomatoes!

Yield: About 6 servings
 

Ingredients:
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds  potatoes
2 large peppers
vegetable oil
1 cup packed basil leaves
1 cup packed cilantro leaves
3 large garlic cloves
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon roasted ground cumin
2 large onions, peeled and cut into eighths
1 pound eggplant, cut into long strips
2-3 large tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and diced
1 1/2 cups cooked chickpeas (1 can, rinsed)

Procedure:

  • Preheat the broiler. Bring 6 cups water to boil and add 1 teaspoon salt. Slice the potatoes lengthwise about 1/2 inch thick, boil them for 5 mintues, and drain. Halve the peppers lenthwise, press to flatten them, then brush with vegetable oil. Broil, cut side down, on a baking sheet until blistered but not charred. Stack them on top of one another and set aside to steam. When cool, remove the skins and cut the pieces in half. Set the oven temperature at 350 F.
  • Coarsely chop the basil, cilantro, and garlic, then puree in a small food processor with the olive oil, cumin, and 1/2 teaspoon salt.
  • Toss all the vegetables with 1 teaspoon salt, some freshly ground pepper, and the herb mixture. Using your hands, rub the herb mixture into the vegetables, especially the eggplant, then add the chickpeas and toss once more. Transfer everything to an earthenware gratin dish or a casserole dish . Rinse out the herb container with 1/2 cup water and pour it over all. Cover the gratin dish tightly with foil and bake until tender, about 1 1/2 hours. Remove the foil, brush the exposed vegetables with the juices, and bake for 20 minutes more. Let cool for at least 10 minutes before serving.
  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. On a rimmed baking sheet, spread bread in a single layer and bake until dry and golden brown, about 20 minutes.

    Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine tomatoes, onion, vinegar, and oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add toasted bread and basil, toss to combine. Let sit 20 - 30 minutes to allow bread to soak up liquid. Top with dollops of ricotta and finish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.
     

Fried or Baked Okra 

Still weary of slimy okra? If you haven't tried them breaded and fried/baked then you should definitely give this a try as it is a delicious side dish!
 

Ingredients 

10 pods okra, sliced in 1/4 inch pieces
1 egg, beaten
1 cup cornmeal
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
½ cup vegetable oil ( if frying ons stove top)

Procedure:
For breading I typically toss the okra into the dry mix of cornmeal plus seasonings, then dip into eggwash, then back into cornmeal mixture. Once they are breaded you have the choice to fry them up in oil on the stove top or Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. On a rimmed baking sheet, spread bread in a single layer and bake until dry and golden brown, about 20 minutes. Also heard they were pretty tasty air fried too....

Meanwhile,if you want to spruce them up, in a large bowl, combine tomatoes, onion, vinegar, and an extra drizzle of oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add toasted bread and basil, toss to combine. Let sit 20 - 30 minutes to allow bread to soak up liquid. Top with dollops of ricotta and finish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.



Let us know if you give them try and if you are doing anything exciting with your summer bounty so far this year! 



Thanks so much for being our members,
The Clagett Farm Team


Week 14: Rain, Rain, Go Away!

 

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This week's Share

Garlic, 1 head
Onions, ~ 1/2 pound
Shallots, ~ 1/2 pound
Eggplant, 1.5 pounds
Sweet Peppers, 4 mix of ripe (red & orange) and unripe (green)
Tomatoes, so many!
Squash, 1
Choose: 1.5 lbs okra or 0.5 lb hot chili peppers
 

U-Pick 

Continue to sign up for a slot through link below! 

                            U-Pick SIGN UP!!!!                             


Newly added!!! 

  • Tomatoes (field F) - all of the larger tomato varieties below the cherries are up for grabs, IMPORTANT- these are not tied up so be very careful where you step so as to not break plants or crush any good tomatoes!! 
    Going down the field varieties include:
                      Garden peach, small, yellow, fuzzy with blushes of pnk when ripe
                      Verona,red roma/plum
                      Roma, red larger plum shaped  
                      New Girl, red slicing tomato
  • Chili Peppers (field F)- much easier to find as they are in same field as the cherry tomatoes across from wash station/ pick up location, they will be closer to the greenhouse. VERY IMPORTANT- Please Please Please use pruners to harvest these as they are very fragile plants!!! 

     
  • Okra (field B2)- this field is way out there, and  you will need to walk a long way on foot to reach it.  When you enter farm you will stay straight to go towards main office.  You may park near the garage/ shed area as to not block driveway, and from here continue on foot up the road that leads behind garage/shed. 
           As you are going up the hill you will be turning left once you see a covered firewood pile. The gate you come to is for the field B4 but B2 will be the small field connected to it in the far left corner. (Okra is an itchy plant wear long sleeves and gloves, and bring pruners!)


U-Pick Items Continuing on....

  • Cherry Tomatoes and a few of the Sunrise Bumblebee ( Located in the fenced in field across from washing station in field "F" in the first 2 rows - Again be careful in areas not tied up!!
  • Any Flowers you see on the farm , but in particular, the Sunflowers are blooming nicely ( those are located next to the large parking lot used for u-picking that is in field "G2") Some Zinnias could probably still be found ( in the large field that is passed on your right on the way into the farm across from the 3 barns, in field "D")  
  •  Herbs ( which for the most part are located behind the washing station, if you desire more "Regular" Basil it will be located down in field D nearby the zinnias)

    Basils (Genovese "Regular", Thai, Kapoor Tulsi, Aromatto, Round Midnight, Greek, Lemon"Fancy")
    Cutting Celery (this is a celery grown for its leaves rather than stems)
    Garlic Chives
    Lemon Balm
    Lemon Verbena
    Marjoram
    Onion Chives
    Oregano
    Parsley 
    (these are starting to flower and aren't producing many leaves)
    Sage
    Shiso
    Sorrel
    Spearmint
    Summer Savory
    Thyme


  

Announcements 

  • Too much rain dancing!!!! As much as the weather as been our friend this year, we are finally starting to deal with TOO MUCH rain. Plants generally thrive in periods of moderate dry and wet. The past couple of weeks have left us in quite a period of wet. 

    This weather causes some trouble for tomatoes and winter squash as they do not like having wet leaves. Sadly that's the way of farming, but let's enjoy what mother nature has already given us this harvest season so far!!! 

Other Info 

  • Remember NOW is the time to request your absentee ballot if you are a Maryland resident!
  • We continue to place bruised, misshapen and damaged but usable vegetables on a cart near our compost pile.  Help yourselves!  You may also add your own compost to that nearby pile.
  • We've just past the halfway point of your CSA season.  If you are a 26-week member and have missed shares, consider doubling them now while we have plenty.  
  • Need another easy way to use those 6 pounds of tomatoes before they go bad?  Wash them, cut out the stems, and drop them into a crockpot on low.  Leave them to simmer for a long, long time (overnight works).  Now that it's sauce, zip it with an immersion blender to break up the skins (or feed it through a food mill to remove the skins).  Then put the sauce in jars or bags and, once they're cooled, put them in the freezer.  Easy!  

Hoping for sunnier days ahead!! 

Thanks so much for being our members,

The Clagett Farm Team