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October 2011

This Week's Share: Sweet Potatoes, Eggplant and Greens

 

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(Photo from CSA Member Krossbow on Flickr)

Good afternoon!

Two quick notes:

  • Saturday is the Potluck Fall Festival at the farm. We hope you can join us!  Details
  • Following Carrie's news that we are losing the parking spaces that house the Dupont pickup, we have heard from a number of you about potential ideas for new pickup locations, should we continue with the Dupont.  If you have ideas for new pick-up locations, or a connection that can offer a place for us to park and set up tables, please let us know. You can email Clay with ideas

And now, here's what you'll find in this week's CSA Share:

  • 1 head garlic
  • 3 1/4 pound total combination sweet potatoes + eggplant
  • 3/4 pound total combination peppers + radishes + okra
  • Choice of one of the following:
    • 1/2 pound of beans + kale + chiles + tomatoes + chard 
    • 1/4 pound spicy mix + lettuce 
    • 1 pound turnip greens
  • As many sweet potato greens as you would like

 

On U-Pick this week:

  • Beans: The beans are starting to get a little tough but still available. 
  • Sweet Potato Greens:  Don't pick the potatoes, but the greens are available for u-pick. 
  • Okra. It's still available.  We suggest that people pick it the day before the harvest days (Fridays and Mondays).  
  • Tomatillos. They’re available and a bit easier to find now that the sunflowers have been cut. 
  • Swiss Chard. It’s available for picking as well, but it is small. 
  • Basil. Still lots of basil.
  • Chile Peppers. Still available. 
  • Flowers. Any flowers on the farm are yours for picking.
  • Herbs. There is a large variety of herbs available. 

If you have any questions, let me know!

-- Clay

 


Where will the Dupont pick-up go next year?

Currently, our Dupont pick-up takes place in the parking lot of the First Baptist Church of Washington, DC.  They've informed us that they might be ripping up that parking lot to build a condominium, and that might happen as early as next summer.  We don't think it would be wise to sell shares at the Dupont pick-up for next year if we can't be confident that we can use that space through November 2012.  So we're considering our options:

  1. We can eliminate the Dupont pick-up completely beginning in 2012.  This would mean $4500 less income for us, and a lot of unhappy former members.  But it would streamline our harvest day on Tuesdays, so our labor and vehicle requirements would be lower, as well as our stress.  Basically, we're happy with this option, but we know that you would not be. 
    • A subset of this option is that you, as members, could hire people to do the delivery for you.  For example, if one person wants to pick up 8 shares and deliver them, the group could pay them the $480/season you would have paid us (you pay $60 more to pick up at Dupont instead of the farm).  There is definitely something lost when you don't get to interact with your farmers, so I'm not sure if this is really better than going to a farmers' market, instead. 
  2. We can find a new location to do the pick-up.  We would need:
    • someplace convenient for the walkers, bikers and subway riders who work or live near our current location,
    • at least 1 parking space for our vehicle, and the area of two parking spaces (although it could be on grass or in a building) very nearby for the food, from 4:30-7:30pm on Tuesdays.
    • Bonus:  We would be really grateful to have a covered area that we could use when it rains.

I have looked around a bit in the past to find a new pick-up site, and haven't had much success.  If any of you have ideas, see if the property owners are interested, and let us know how we can contact them

By the way, we have nothing but positive feelings for First Baptist Church.  They have let us use their valuable space for years now, free of charge.  And we certainly can't blame them for wanting more from that corner than just a flat parking lot.   Times change and we can change too!

Your farmer,

-Carrie 


Post-Lee update

The last time I posted a crop update it was raining outside, thanks to tropical storm Lee.  Over the course of one month we received 20 inches of rain--on average we get 40 inches per year.  Now that 2 weeks have passed, most (but not all!) of the pools drained, and we have some more news:

  • It is with great personal sadness that I must report the 100% loss of our spinach and arugula.  I was really excited when they first popped out of the ground so nicely.  But they all rotted.  There is no longer an active stream in the field, but a lot of the soil has moved over about 20 feet into the grass, and it's still wet enough in parts of the field to get my boot stuck. 
  • The lettuce is still hanging in there.  It hasn't grown since I last looked at it, but it hasn't died, either.  I can see some sun shining through the window right now.  Perhaps it will be tall enough to harvest for your next share? 
  • Hooray sweet potatoes!  They weathered the storms beautifully, and we've started digging them up.  Saturday members, your potatoes are curing at this very moment. 
  • Okra is still going strong.  How do they make pods without sunlight?  Beats the heck out of me. 
  • About half of the pepper plants wilted and died after all the rain.  The eggplants still look pretty good. 
  • Basil is still standing, but quite yellow.
  • We waded into the tomato field after it stopped raining, and declared the field dead.  But in fact a few of the plants are still hanging on, and we'll eek out a couple more pounds of fruit before the season ends.  I'm not sure how to split that between 280 members, but it means that most of you won't see any more tomatoes.
  • The nursery finally gave us the broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower seedlings that we ordered.  My guess is that they will not make heads before the days get so short that they stop growing.  But we covered it all with floating row cover just to see if we could jump start their growth a bit. 
  • The turnips look good.  The carrots are taking their sweet time, and don't look like they will be ready until January. 
  • One bean field is plowed under, one has stopped producing new pods, so most of the beans there now are pretty old and tough.  One is just beginning, and has a few new beans on it.  Beans don't love the cool, gray weather, so we'll see whether they do much.  The bean bonanza is over, and my knees are grateful. 

Your farmer,

Carrie

 

 


This Week's Share: Sweet Potatoes and Sweet Potato Greens

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(This photo via absentmindedprof on Flickr)


Good afternoon!

Before we share the details for this week, I want to point out that late last week we posted details about the Potluck Fall Festival. Be sure to check out that post. We hope you can make it! 

And now, here's what you'll find in this week's CSA Share:

  • 1 head garlic
  • 2 1/2 pound total combination sweet potatoes plus eggplant
  • 3/4 pound total combination peppers + okra + green tomatoes
  • 1/4 pound total combination salad greens + radishes + kale + beans + chiles
  • An as-yet-undetermined quantity of sweet potato greens.

A few notes on using this week's produce:

  • Sweet Potato Greens: Sweet potato greens can be stir-fried or sauteed as you would similar greens such as kale. The greens have three parts:  the leaf, the stem and a branch. You should eat and prepare only the leaves and tender stem (you'll find that the branch is tough). There's a good piece on Sweet Potato Greens that ran on the Washington Post blog in 2007. It also has a recipe included. And here's Sweet Potato Greens recipe we posted on our blog last year after receiving greens from the farm.  
  • Sweet Potatoes: The sweet potatoes in this week's share are uncured. We recommend that you wait 2-5 days before you eat them, so that they will be sweeter. To cure the potatoes, put them where it's very hot and humid. Once they're cured, keep them someplace that's 50 degrees (not in the fridge -- ideal is 55 degrees and 85% humidity). We hope that the potatoes moving forward will already be cured. 

 On U-Pick this week:

  • Beans: The beans are starting to get a little tough but still available. 
  • Sweet Potato Greens:  Don't pick the potatoes, but the greens are available for u-pick. 
  • Okra. It's still available.  We suggest that people pick it the day before the harvest days (Fridays and Mondays).  
  • Tomatillos. They’re available and a bit easier to find now that the sunflowers have been cut. 
  • Swiss Chard. It’s available for picking as well, but it is small. 
  • Basil. Still lots of basil.
  • Chile Peppers. Still available. 
  • Flowers. Any flowers on the farm are yours for picking.
  • Herbs. There is a large variety of herbs available. 

If you have any questions, let me know!

-- Clay

 


Fall Potluck Festival, Saturday October 1st--Join us!

Clagett farm string band fall 2010 
Our fall festival is coming in just two weeks.  Here's the details:

  • FREE, and open to everyone.  Hayrides and other farm tours are free, but we suggest bringing some money for items we'll mention below...
  • Potluck meal.  We'll be sharing food at 2pm.  We'll provide water, iced herbal tea and lemonade.  New this year--we're giving you two food options:
    • Bring a dish:  For those of you that aren't familiar with potlucks, bring any dish (entree, salad, dessert or appetizer) that is enough for at least 8 people.
    • Or pay a little cash:  If you don't feel like preparing a dish, we still want you to come to the festival and enjoy yourself.  We've asked our farm manager's daughter-in-law, Maria Heller, to prepare some delicious homemade beans and rice in the style of her native Nicaragua.  She will contribute to the potluck on behalf of anyone who would rather pay a little money than bring food.  Once we get a better idea exactly what she'll cook, we'll know how much each person should pay to cover her the cost of her time and ingredients.      
  • Music.  Back by popular demand, the Clagett Farm string band.  We'll scatter some hay bales for you to sit on.  You might prefer to bring your own chair.
  • Silent Auction.  Even if you're not coming to the festival, you can donate something for the auction.  We take all kinds of homemade items, event tickets and gadgets.  Pies and pottery sell well, for example.  Did your daughter out-grow her bicycle and helmet?  Donate them to the silent auction!  Old lamps that belong at a yard sale do not sell well.  It's helpful if you can bring auction items to your CSA pick-up this week or next, so we can set them out as soon as the festival begins. 
  • Mums and pansies for sale.  Melwood is a community near us that serves people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.  They have greenhouses and will be selling lovely plants at very reasonable prices at our festival.  (They are not organic.) 
  • Schedule.
    • 1:00pm Arrive, park, set down your food, make an initial auction bid
    • 1:00-4:00pm CSA pick-up behind the Education barn--not in the washing station.
    • 1:15-2:00pm Hayride.  Visit the cows and chickens with your kids. 
    • 1:15-2:00pm Medicinal Herb Walk with Holly Poole-Kavana.  Let Holly show you what's growing on the farm that you can pick for yourself for better overall health.  Flu season is approaching!
    • 2:00pm Eat, chat, listen to music, place final bids on auction items.
    • 2:45pm Silent auction ends.   Winners pay and take their goodies.
    • 3:00-4:00pm Hayride, just like the first one.
    • 3:00-4:00pm Walking tour.  Check out the run-off plots, ask your burning farming and gardening questions.  Hear about our newest ideas and biggest failures.  Walk to some of the fields that aren't on the paved driveway.
    • 4:00pm Festival ends.   
  • Summary of what to bring--all are optional, so it's OK to bring just yourself.
    • Your family, friends and neighbors
    • Some food to share
    • Cash or checkbook
    • A chair or blanket, if you prefer it over a hay bale
    • Cup, plate, bowl, flatware.  We'll provide some if you don't bring your own.
    • Items to donate for Silent auction, if you haven't brought them already.

 Hayride spring 2011
Holly leading herb walk spring 2011 
Chickens spring 2011 

  Photo at top of page:  Clagett Farm String Band from the 2010 Fall festival (from left: Sue Straney with the fiddle, Billl Humm center, Stan Haley on the right), taken by Craig Jones

Other photos, taken by Clay Dunn at the 2011 Spring Meet n Greet: Carrie Vaughn driving a hayride, Holly Poole-Kavana leading the Medicinal Herb Walk, and our chickens (2nd stop on the hayride).

DIRECTIONS to Clagett Farm, 11904 Old Marlboro Pike, Upper Marlboro MD 20772

  • FROM 395 OR 295 IN D.C.:  From 395 North, follow signs onto 295 South.  Take exit 3A onto Suitland Parkway.  After 9 miles, turn right onto Route 4 South (Pennsylvania Ave).  Continue 5 miles.  Take the exit on your left Ritchie Marlboro Rd.  At the stop sign turn left, and then at your first stop light, turn left onto Old Marlboro Pike.  The farm is one mile down the road on your right.  Look for the sign “Clagett Center; Chesapeake Bay Foundation”.  
  • FROM 495: Take exit 11A, Route 4 South (which is Pennsylvania Ave. running out of SE DC) and continue 5.7 miles.  (DO NOT take the Old Marlboro Pike exit from Route 4.)  Take the exit on your left Ritchie Marlboro Rd.  At the stop sign turn left, and then at your first stop light, turn left onto Old Marlboro Pike.  The farm is one mile down the road on your right.  Look for the sign “Clagett Center; Chesapeake Bay Foundation”.  
  • FROM BALTIMORE AND POINTS NORTH AND EAST: Take Route 301 south and then Rte. 4 north (towards Washington) for 2 miles.  Take the Ritchie Marlboro Road exit.  At your first stop light, turn left onto Old Marlboro Pike.  The farm is one mile down the road on your right.  Look for the sign “Clagett Center; Chesapeake Bay Foundation”.

Cooking with Winter Squash

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(Photo from CSA member Krossbow on Flickr)

This week's share includes the last of the winter squash -- pumpkins, acorn squash and butternuts. (Blame Irene!)  

With only a brief appearance in the share, you'll no doubt want to make the most of these squash. 

Here are a few ideas for how to use winter squash, be it from the share or another source this winter. 

 

Acorn Squash

When we cook acorn squash at home, we keep it very simple. As we once shared on our blog, The Bitten Word:

Split 'em across the middle, scoop out the seeds, shave off the top and bottom so the two halves can sit upright. Then slather each half with a little salt, add a pat of butter and a glug of maple syrup, and bake for about 45 minutes at 350 degrees.

It's easy and no-fuss. You can get fancier though. Here are a few more options:

 

Butternut Squash

And here are a few ideas for using butternut squash. 

 

Do you have a favorite winter squash recipe? Please share it here!


This Week's Share: Kale, Radishes and More

July 26 Harvest2
(This photo via CSA Member Susan Minor)

Natural disasters and torrential downpours behind us, let's get on with September!

If you missed it late last week, Carrie posted an excellent update on all the crops at the farm here on the blog. I highly recommend that you read it if you want to know more about the state of the farm. At the bottom of this update there's some new information about how crops are faring, also. 

Also, the Fall Festival is just a few weeks away, taking place on October 1. We'll be looking for items for our silent auction and would love any items you can donate that may appeal to our CSA community. More on that and the festival soon! 

And now, here's what you'll find in this week's CSA Share:

  • 1/4 pound total combination kale + chard + sweet potato greens
  • 2 pounds total combination eggplant + peppers + cucumbers (this is the last of the cucumbers) + winter squash (small pumpkins, acorn squash and butternuts -- this will also be the end of winter squash)
  • 1/2 pound total combination okra + beans + radishes + haruki turnips + rhubarb
  • 1 head garlic

 On U-Pick this week:

  • Beans: There are still lots of beans. Those picking today were able to pick about a pound per ten minutes. Come out and pick some beans! 
  • Sweet Potato Greens:  Don't pick the potatoes, but the greens are available for u-pick. 
  • Okra. It's still available.  We suggest that people pick it the day before the harvest days (Fridays and Mondays).  
  • Tomatillos. They’re available and a bit easier to find now that the sunflowers have been cut. 
  • Swiss Chard. It’s available for picking as well, but it is small. 
  • Basil. Still lots of basil.
  • Chile Peppers. Still available. 
  • Flowers. Any flowers on the farm are yours for picking.
  • Herbs. There is a large variety of herbs available. 

A preview of next week and some updates on crops: 

  • Following up from Carrie's update last week, potatoes are definitely done for the season, but sweet potatoes are looking great. 
  • Squash, cucumbers and tomatoes are done for the season. 

If you have any questions, let me know!

-- Clay

 


Once again, in spite of natural disasters, we will have your share tomorrow.

If you haven't seen photos of the flooding in Upper Marlboro, you should definitely check them out: Washington Post slideshow- DC area flooding.  Fortunately, the farm is on much higher ground.  Some of our fields are flooded, but the driveways are all passable, the barns are dry, and we don't expect any long-term damage from this particular rain event.  Our van is currently stuck in a field, and we're planning to get it out sometime Sunday or Monday.  Our pick-up is stranded at a mechanic's and surrounded (but not in) flood waters.  We'll be using Michael's truck for our harvest tomorrow, but can't drive it to many of our fields, so we'll be lugging a lot of bins on foot.  I never like walking in mud to pick the crops, since that damages soil structure, but it's not worth cancelling the share for that reason alone, since the soil can recover.  

Getting to and from the farm:  We haven't had any trouble driving down Old Marlboro Pike to Route 4 toward Washington and Suitland Parkway.  Likewise it's clear driving down Ritchie-Marlboro Rd to the beltway.  If you're coming from Route 301, or any other points east on Rte. 4, you should check traffic reports and map out your route carefully. 

We were parched dry this summer and now we've barely had a break from the rain since the drought broke in mid-August.  Every day for the last 3 days my rain guage has overflowed at 5 inches.  Climate change has been rough on Clagett Farm this year, but looking at the news, it feels like we've been lucky.  

Given all the rain (and rain, and rain, and rain), I thought it would be a good time to take a break in the office and give all of you an update on your crops.

  • Sweet potatoes are looking terrific.  There's still two groundhogs (down from 5) eating up a corner of one of the fields, but the fence has kept the deer out.  The potatoes are about 2-4 inches long right now, and growing.  We expect to dig them up in about a month.
  • Lettuce, spinach and spicy mix in our early August planting didn't germinate because it was too dry.  We re-seeded just before it rained and they germinated abundantly.  Right now they look good but small.  Two weeks-worth of sun and you'll have heaps of salad.  Of course they may have washed away since I last looked, but I think they're probably OK. 
  • Kale and collards grow a bit more slowly.  About a third of them germinated well even in the dry weather, and that's what we're harvesting now.  We re-seeded the rest, and it won't be ready for 3 more weeks (assuming the sun comes out at some point). 
  • Broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage:  We've had some trouble with our greenhouse seedlings this year, and we think we might finally have diagnosed the problem.  We purchase compost for our soil mix from a neighbor who uses horse manure and straw bedding.  This has worked well for us for years, so at first we didn't think that was the reason why many of our seeds weren't germinating.  There is an herbicide that some farmers use on their hay fields (especially hay for horses) that we've recently learned is so persistent that it can still kill our seedlings after it's been through the horse's digestive tract and then through a compost pile for over a year.  We were surprised to hear about this, and think it might be why we've had such poor seed germination with our tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage.  We've already prepared our own compost for next spring's seedlings from our own cow manure which will be 100% herbicide-free.  So I'm hoping we've solved the problem going forward.  In the meantime, we ordered organic broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage seedlings from a nursery.  By the time we ordered them, we knew they would be planted about a month late, and now with the rain they will be even later.  I'm just hoping they'll make heads before the season ends. 
  • Carrots, turnips and radishes:  As always, the radishes and turnips are growing like gangbusters, and the carrots have been slow and sparse.  I'm pretty bitter about it, and so are the turnips. 
  • Squash and cucumbers:  Wet weather is horrible for squash and apparently a hurricane is even worse.  So the winter squash are dead (including pumpkins).  The last planting of summer squash and cucumbers should be fruiting right now, but I think those have probably kicked the dust in the last couple days. 
  • Beans:  This has been the craziest year for beans ever.  Most years we'll plant beans 3-4 times over the summer, and we get beans from each planting for about 3-4 weeks.  We started harvesting from our first planting (the one in D field near the okra) in late June.  Then the plants quit producing in late July when the fields dried up.  Then in August we got rain and they kicked in again with a new lease on life.  Our second planting flowered for a month in the drought with no beans, no beans, no beans, and then...BAM!  BEANS!  We've been picking them for a couple weeks now and I don't think we've picked all the way through any of the rows yet.  PLEASE COME PICK BEANS!!  We just can't keep up.  It takes about 5-10 minutes to pick a pound, which is easy, right?  But for us to give all 430 shares a half pound each it takes 24 hours.  Even with a crew of 5, that can take most of our two harvest days, and doesn't leave much time to scrounge around for the last tomatoes or hunt for fallen tomatillos.  The most ridiculous part of this is that by mid-August we hadn't had many beans this summer, so we planted a third succession.  They've just started to flower... 
  • Tomatoes usually thrive in dry weather, so we don't tend to irrigate until we're desperate.  We got desperate in August, and laying drip tape in that field was on the top of my to-do list.  Then it started raining and hasn't quit since.  They put out a heroic number of pounds in August, but the rain quickened their natural decline from the diseases they accumulate over the course of the summer.  So they're basically done.  We'll see what we can get from the plants over the next few weeks.  Then we'll strip off the green tomatoes, pull out the stakes and twine and till them in.  When you see those green tomatoes in your share, you'll know that's the end. 
  • Eggplants and peppers are still poking along.  They don't suffer as much disease pressure as tomatoes do, but stink bugs have been a nuisance.  We should continue having eggplants, peppers (and more stink bugs) through the end of September.  The fruits are a little uglier these days, but if you close your eyes and you won't mind a bit. 
  • Chile peppers:  There's a bunch out there and this year they are HOT.  Help yourself!  The little red ones dry very well.  Hang them someplace in your kitchen and they will keep for years, if necessary.  The others are easily frozen. 
  • Okra harvests will decline in the coming weeks, but the plants still look good and I'm sure we'll still be picking them until our first frost. 
  • Potatoes were a horrible disaster.  The last 2 years I thought we had found a good technique to plant the seed potatoes deeper, which led to higher yields.  But this year we planted them even deeper, and then the spring was a bit cooler and wetter than normal and I think they rotted.  So now I've learned the hard way that 1 foot deep is TOO DEEP.  We found exactly 10 pounds after an afternoon of digging in the first field.  So we abandoned that field, tilled in the weeds and planted a cover crop (which is now about to wash away, of course--that field has been mocking me all summer!).  We haven't looked in the second field yet, which might be a little better, but might I'm not counting on it. 
  • Swiss chard:  These plants sit dormant in the heat of summer, and now they should be re-growing.  They have a disease called leaf spot which makes their leaves unappealing (but otherwise fine to eat).  We're hoping that the cooler weather will reduce the disease and increase leaf growth, so there will be some nice leaves to pick for your share. 
  • Herb and flower beds:  We had this big plan for a volunteer crew that would plant, weed and water that space all summer.  But it was way too much work for them.  We have a new plan for next year that will involve much more woven plastic weed barrier.  In the meantime, please accept our apologies.  The flowers were especially hard-hit.  Three bright spots:  lemongrass grew well and multiplied, so we can plant even more next year; and a few rosemary plants look good.  We've got our fingers crossed that the rosemary will survive the winter, and we can use them to start many more plants to give out in shares and/or plant in our herb beds.  Also, this has been a great year for basil.  We planted them extra-early, and though they have started to tire out a little, I think we'll have basil all the way until our first frost.  There's still time, if you haven't yet stocked your freezer with pesto for winter (or if your freezer thawed after the hurricane black-outs).
  • Cows:  Beef isn't part of your CSA share, but some of you know and love the cows.  So I thought I would give you an update on them, as well.  They calved very well this year, and all have been quite healthy.  But unlike most years, Michael will have to purchase a lot of hay, since they haven't been able to cut hay since July--first because the grass wouldn't grow without rain, and then because we haven't had three consecutive dry days to cut and bale it. 

Overall, I'm surprised to be standing, to be honest.  It has been a tough weather year, and I've made some difficult mistakes.  But I think your shares have been pretty good--not as big as last year, but we've had good variety and some terrific you-pick tomatoes.  And there's still time for some nice fall salads and sweet potato pie.  Or another hurricane.  Who can tell?

Your farmer,

Carrie 

 


This Week's Share: Acorn Squash, Radishes, Beans and More

Deborahbeans
(This photo from CSA member Deborah Starobin Armstrong)

 

Happy September!

The share details are included below. 

Following up on last week's update, we're sad to report that the hurricane did take out the winter sqush. There is some winter squash in this week's share, but due to the storm there will be no pumpkins or butternuts. 

Here's what you'll find in this week's CSA Share:

  • 2 pounds total combination acorn squash + okra + garlic
  • 1/2 pound total combination beans (all pick-up locations) + kale (for the farm pick-up) or tomatoes, lemongrass, basil & chiles (for the Dupont pick-up)
  • 1 pound total combination radishes + eggplant + peppers

 

On U-Pick this week:

  • Beans: There are still lots of beans. Those picking today were able to pick about a pound per ten minutes. Come out and pick some beans! 
  • Sweet Potato Greens:  Don't pick the potatoes, but the greens are available for u-pick. 
  • Tomatoes. Ripe tomatoes are off the list but green tomatoes are on.  
  • Okra. It's still available.  We suggest that people pick it the day before the harvest days (Fridays and Mondays).  
  • Tomatillos. They’re available but word of warning: they are hard to find.
  • Swiss Chard. It’s available for picking as well!
  • Basil. Still lots and lots of basil.
  • Chile Peppers. There are six varieties available.
  • Potatoes. If you want to dig some potatoes, you are welcome to, but it is difficult. You have been warned!
  • Flowers. Any flowers on the farm are yours for picking.
  • Herbs. There is a large variety, including mint, oregano, sorrel, lemon balm, thyme, lavender, sage and others.

A preview of next week and some updates on crops: 

  • Coming up: We still expect to introduce fall items like lettuce, kale and spinach in the coming weeks.

If you have any questions, let me know!

-- Clay