2018 CSA Survey Results (Post 1 of 3)
2018 CSA Survey Results: Your Comments and My Responses (Post 3 of 3)

2018 CSA Survey Results: What You Loved and What You Hated (Post 2 of 3)

Clagett tractor
Moving hay bales at the farm. Click over to Instagram for a cute little video of this.

We're back with more results from the 2018 member survey. Here's the first post about that, in case you missed it.

In sifting through all the responses, it turns out that most of you just want more of everything, and more choices generally.  

But here’s a few highlights worth mentioning:

  • Of the crops we grow, your favorites, in order of preference, are: tomatoes, kale/collards, strawberries, garlic, sweet potatoes and peppers.  Excellent!  Those are all crops we can grow in abundance in a reasonable year.  2019 is going to be a winner -- I can feel it!
  • Your least favorites, in order of distaste are:  stinging nettles, turnips, okra, rhubarb, kohlrabi and ground cherries.  I could have guessed all of those except the ground cherries.  But the ground cherries had an early demise this year, so perhaps some of you got some bad ones while those plants were petering out.  We’ll be more careful next year. For those of you who chose okra, the deer had you covered -- I’ve never seen an animal make such quick work of complete crop destruction.  I was a little sad about it, but I’m glad many of you were not. And while strawberries look VERY promising for 2019, the rhubarb does not (it’s another perennial, so its plant health in the fall is a good indicator for spring success).  Again, I’m a big rhubarb fan, so I’ll do my best to bring that one back to life for 2020 -- I just won’t make you take it if you don’t want it. One thing that’s worth noting is that many of your least favorite items (nettles, turnips, rhubarb and kohlrabi, as well as microgreens, spicy mix and radishes, which were next on the unfavored list) are crops we grow in the spring.  Spring is a tough season -- cold soil, not enough sun, and wild variations in temperature and rain -- so we don’t have as many choices of what to put in your share. Fortunately, almost any fresh spring vegetable is an improvement on winter, so we’re grateful for those of you who take May and June as an opportunity to get creative.
  • 68% of you dried, canned, froze or otherwise stored some of your CSA produce for use in the 6 months we’re apart.  Well done! Almost all of you wished you could have stored more.  I am like the 23% of you who didn’t stock away enough for lack of time, which is why I’ve been muttering lately about not having enough pesto in my freezer or jars of tomato soup on my shelf.  We had SO MUCH BASIL! And even though I regretted not having our normal deluge of tomatoes, there were many weeks with full bins of damaged tomatoes to pick through. Alas... But the reason most of you gave for not storing enough for winter was that we didn’t offer you enough of the vegetables you desired.  Well, indeed, you’re right about that. Here’s hoping for a more prosperous 2019.
  • You wanted more flowers.  I mean, you wanted more of a lot of things, but for you-pick, you wanted more flowers as much as you wanted more strawberries and tomatoes, which is saying something.  As it happens, our flower grower had a baby mid-summer. She was pretty exhausted before, during and after that happened. But she assures me that she is in no mood for a repeat performance in 2019, so we’ve heard your plea for flowers and we’re on it. We’re putting Baby Teddy in charge of the trellis.  I’m kidding. That baby never does what I tell him to.

 

Getting excited for 2019 yet?  You can sign up for a share today! www.cbf.org/clagettsignup

In my next post, we’ll get to the fun part, where you’ve tossed out barrage of questions, requests, imperatives, complaints and compliments, and I do my best to respond.

Your farmer,
Carrie

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