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July 2013

June 2013

Oyster Shell Recycling Tax Credit In Maryland Starts July 1st 2013

This is a thumbs up for oyster recycling awareness! We already have many individuals and restaurants supporting the program, tell a friend/neighbor let's grow the number. Volunteers have dropped over over 360 bushel since January, keep the shell coming. 

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Weather you already recycle your oyster shell with CBF or our partner ORP-Oyster Recovery Partnership Shell Recycling Alliance you need to register so your shell donations can be tracked. Maybe you have never heard of shell recycling and wondering what the shell, all the buzz is about! Watch this video to learn more. Oyster recycling bins to help replenish population | Maryland News - WBAL Home

If you have extra time and a pickup truck the MD Oyster Team is always looking for volunteers to help manage our drop of bins. Volunteers help monitor one or more SOS (Save Oyster Shell) Bin and bring the 'green' oyster shells to our central facility in Shady Side, Maryland to age for at least one year. Email DJohannes@cbf.org with questions or get involved. 

 

How Do Organizations Like CBF Recycle Oyster Shell?

Spat on shellThe fresh oyster shell, is referred to as green shell. It still has organic material attached to the shell and could potentially transmit disease from one location to another if placed back into the water without aging. So we collect oyster shell and let it age at our Oyster Restoration Center in Shady Side, Maryland; our partners also have several locations around the state of Maryland for aging oyster shell. Oyster shells are essential to restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, aged half shells are used as homes for baby oysters (spat) like the shell in the photo. Your recycled shells are placed in one of four setting tanks at CBF's Oyster Center along with of water, oxygen, and millions of microscopic oyster larvae. The larvae swim in the tanks for 24-48 hours before settling out and attaching to the shells. After a 10-14 days in the tank these young spat-on-shell will be planted using our vessel the Patricia Campbell

Where Can I Bring My Oyster Shell?

Save Oyster Shell Drop Off Locations MD

Register Today

Recycle Oyster Shells

 

Individuals/Caters: Individuals and Caters are eligible to receive a $1 Maryland tax credit beginning July 2013 for every bushel of oyster and clam shell that is recycled and returned to the State’s inventory. Up to $750 annually may be credited. To become a member of the Shell Recycling Alliance, begin receiving your tax credit or learn more about the program where you can recycle your shell, visit www.shellrecycling.org

Volunteers: If you are interested in collecting and recycling shell for the Shell Recycling Alliance, you are eligible a $.14 per mile tax deduction for the mileage you drove in support of the charity / recycling effort. Please contact the Shell Recycling Alliance to learn about volunteer efforts. Consult with your tax advisor for your tax deductibility for your volunteer contribution. Visit www.shellrecycling.org

http://www.oysterrecovery.org/sra_forms/SRA_Reg.html

http://www.oysterrecovery.org/maryland-tax-benefits-with-shell-recycling/

 

-Meghan Hoffman


2013 MD Oyster Restoration Season Update

Just in case you were wondering Maryland's Oyster Center has produced (x) so far in 2013.

-Set 10 tanks (sets) of Spat On Shell yielding 10,880,066 baby 'spat' oysters

-Set 5 tanks (sets) of Spat On Reef Ball, that's 182 reef balls / oyster + critter condominiums out in the bay 

-Recycled 268.4 bushels of shell (Save Oyster Shell)

-Turned one of our four tanks over local watermen in the area switching to aquaculture for the remainder of the season. A great outreach program connecting watermen and CBF with the common goal of clean water and a HEALTHY Chesapeake Bay!

Blog graph Graph 2

Things are looking great so far this season. Keep your fingers crossed that the oyster larvae being produced at UMD's Horn Point Laboratory remain healthy and strong so we can have another banner year. 

 

- Meghan Hoffman


Tales Of A Passionate Oyster Gardener, Jamie Attanasio!

Jamie 1I have had the pleasure of working with Jame Attanasio and her parents since taking over the Oyster Gardening Program at CBF in 2010, yet her passion extends my tenure begining as a oyster gardener back to 2008. Jamie just completed her freshman year in high school in Montgomery County, but everytime I have a chance to catch up with Jamie she is involved in something new; she is young and full of adventure. Her passion for the critters and making the Chespeake Bay healthier, remains steadfast. Her inital oyster garden of 4 cages (which is the standard) has grown to 18 cages at Oak Grove Marina on the South River.  How many baby oysters has she raised, you ask? Why almost 60,000 thousand oysters, that is impressive! 

Basket

For the past three years she has also represented CBF and Oyster Gardening at Rockville Science Day.  Each year it attendance grows, with now over 3,000 people attending. Jamie, with the help of her friends and family, think of new and creative ways to teach/showcase the wonders of oysters for all ages to enjoy each year. Since she is still young herself, she had done a fabulous job connecting with the kids who line up to see and take part in activites at the 'cool oyster booth'. 

Jamie #3Jamie (far right) and friends at Rockville Science Day

The Attanasio family (Kevin, Ann, & Jamie) spend their free time boating in the Chespeake Bay near the South River. Kevin, Jamie's father, who comes from a family of watermen in New York, likes to help Jamie produce the biggest healthiest young oysters she can each season. So a little brainstorming and a few trips to the local hardware store later, all 18 oysters cages have been modified to help with maintaing the oysters and to protect the boats in the marina. The Attanasio family added simple PVC tubes on either side of the cages, thus making them buoyant and very visable. The tubes are slighly longer than the cages to protect the boats moving in and out of slips from dings and scratches. This adapted cage style keeps the oysters  at the top of the water column during the warmer months where food and oxygen are more abundant. During the cold winter months they remove the tubing and sink the cages, suspending each one just off the bottom to protect the precious baby oysters from the cold air during blow out tides. 

FloatsJamie's mom, Ann helping to unload oysters from cages

I want to end on a note of thanks. Jamie and her family are incredible stewards of the Chesapeake Bay and make my job very rewarding. Jamie Attanasio is a young leader I can't wait to see what adventures await her in the future. She will do great things, and she is ensuring her path in life promotes clean water and nature. 

Jamie young

If you want to become a CBF Oyster Gardener please visit our webiste and sign up for a workshop later in the fall. 

-Meghan Hoffman (photos courtesy of myself and the Attanasio Family)

Jame plus meghan